Quiz about Using Horse Sense to Assist the Blind
Quiz about Using Horse Sense to Assist the Blind

Using Horse Sense to Assist the Blind Quiz


A blind person needs an assistance animal. Which will it be? A miniature guide horse, or a Seeing Eye dog? You be the judge.

A multiple-choice quiz by lilady. Estimated time: 4 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Animal Trivia
  6. »
  7. Horses

Author
lilady
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
306,881
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
2277
Last 3 plays: Guest 65 (9/10), Ehmer1 (6/10), Lwright99 (6/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. A training program was developed for miniature horses to assist in guiding visually impaired people. What is the name of this non-profit charity program? Hint

Seeing Eye, Inc.
Helping Hooves
The Mini Ranchero
The Guide Horse Foundation

2. What is the primary reason a person may choose a miniature horse to a guide dog? Hint

They are the cutest little critters on earth
The cost is less expensive
A harness is not needed for guiding
Life expectancy is longer

3. Which objects and shapes are difficult for a guide horse to perceive? Hint

trees
stop sign
shadows
humans

4. What is an advantage of a Seeing Eye dog to a guide horse in public businesses? Hint

Enhanced maneuverability in an airplane
Ascending and descending staircases
All of these options
More flexibility in public transportation

5. What is the principle for placing sneakers or rubber shoes on a guide horse? Hint

Keeps hooves from scorching on hot pavement
The horse needs a good pair of walking shoes
It is a fashion statement
Provides traction on diverse surfaces

6. In comparison to a Seeing Eye dog, a horse is more apt to do this when encountered with any unexpected commotion. Hint

It will remain absolutely calm
It may charge and injure nearby humans
It will lie down and play dead
It can be spooked easily

7. The Guide Horse Foundation program is prohibited in taking possession of a guide horse after being placed with a visually impaired person.

True
False

8. A guide horse is not compatible with other animals, therefore, a blind handler is not allowed to have other pets.

True
False

9. When a horse feels threatened, its first instinct is to take which of these actions? Hint

run like hell
roll over and play dead
lay down and have his tummy rubbed
freeze in place

10. The Board of the National Association of Guide Dog Users is thrilled about the mobility option that The Guide Horse Foundation program offers.

True
False


(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. A training program was developed for miniature horses to assist in guiding visually impaired people. What is the name of this non-profit charity program?

Answer: The Guide Horse Foundation

In 1999, Don and Janet Burleson, from Kittrell, North Carolina, introduced their trained, miniature horses as a different mobility option for the blind. Janet is considered one of the world's revolutionary horse trainers, but training the horse for its special task requires not only experienced horse training, but also matching the persona of the horse to the needs of the blind recipient. Now, retired from her profession, she is the first person in the world to train a guide horse for the blind. Individualized training of this mobility preference takes six months to one year after the horse reaches six months of age. The Foundation has eighty applicants on a waiting list for one of the Burleson's trained animals. You do the math here. What are the odds of ever getting one?

"The Seeing Eye" is a registered trademark of The Seeing Eye, Inc. in Morristown, New Jersey, which has trained dogs for assisting the blind for many established years. The Guide Horse Foundation is not associated with them, but holds great esteem for their work.

"Helping Hooves" (January 2006), is a book written by Mrs. Burleson for those wishing to learn more on how to train a guide horse.
2. What is the primary reason a person may choose a miniature horse to a guide dog?

Answer: Life expectancy is longer

There is some compensation for utilizing a miniature horse as an assistance animal. Keep in mind; however, these cute creatures are not for everyone. Information about the experimental training should be thoroughly researched, making certain that it is the appropriate selection for the blind individual.

The horse has a life expectancy of thirty-five to forty years, and if well maintained and cared for, it is possible it can survive up to fifty years, compared to the typical duration of a dog with eight to twelve years.

Many owners suffer emotional pain and distress when losing their companion guide dog. Being an owner of a miniature horse with its lifespan, could possibly prevent such unnecessary suffering. On the other hand, if it is not compliant with the handler, or has to be return for any cause, the individual will also experience the grief of giving up their beloved horse.

A horse naturally exhibits an instinct to guide in a range of situations and are more hypoallergenic than dogs for those with canine allergies.

They shed only twice a year, and fleas will never be a dilemma. Nonetheless, in encountering anything eccentric, or new, a horse has a natural flight instinct if it get spooked. It could possibly react by trying to escape from the situation in which, it becomes powerful and hard for the handler to manage.
3. Which objects and shapes are difficult for a guide horse to perceive?

Answer: shadows

The eyes of a horse are located on the sides of its head. This animal will hurl its head if it suspects a person or object is in front of it. A horse is also known to jump over a shadow that it distinguishes to be a step or a stair. A guide horse does not posses the depth perception as a guide dog does. Horses are not certain of their foothold and would rather jump than step down. Because of this, troubles will arise when the horse encounters cracks, curbs, and shadows on the street.
4. What is an advantage of a Seeing Eye dog to a guide horse in public businesses?

Answer: All of these options

Problems could arise with a guide horse in public business districts or areas. For example, if a business has a spiral staircase, it would be nearly impossible for a guide horse to climb. A trained horse can climb stairs usually without any trouble, but they do not appear to be as secure when descending on a downgrade. On the other hand, a dog seems to exploit confidence in either. It can curl up in any form of public transportation such as, taxis, subways, buses, and airplanes where a horse is not adaptable. According to the web site, www.npr.org (April 2002), regarding the American with Disabilities Act, it is stated that, "Confusion stemming from the current law prompted a move for a more careful definition. But the proposed change would exclude birds and horses, among other animals not technically considered common. These are just a few of the nontraditional service animals that are used across the country to help people with disabilities and psychological disorders. As their uses are expanding, however, the government is considering a proposal that would limit the definition of "service animal" to "a dog or other common domestic animal".

Resource: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=98958273

For additional questions concerning the ADA and service animals, please call the Department's ADA Information Line at (800) 514-0301 (voice) or (800) 514-0383 (TTY) or visit the ADA Business Connection at ada.gov.
5. What is the principle for placing sneakers or rubber shoes on a guide horse?

Answer: Provides traction on diverse surfaces

In general, a miniature horse does not have to be outfitted with shoes, but it is vital that the hooves be trimmed every eight to ten weeks. Since the hooves of the guide horse are hard, it can be difficult for it to hold traction on an assortment of surfaces. Losing their footing on slick surfaces such as waxed, linoleum, tile, or hardwood floors, can be a huge hazard. Seeing a mini horse wearing tiny shoes could capture our hearts. Nevertheless, it will also capture our attention as well, more so than a guide dog.

It is very difficult to keep small children from petting a Seeing Eye dog, but can you imagine restraining them from possible contact with a tiny horse with sneakers? These animals are not to be touched or spoken to while on duty with their handler.

The majority of visually impaired persons would rather be unobtrusive as possible for safety purposes. Depending on the duration or severity of the task for the dog, the owner has the alternative to put a cover or protector on its paws.
6. In comparison to a Seeing Eye dog, a horse is more apt to do this when encountered with any unexpected commotion.

Answer: It can be spooked easily

Horses are known to be spooked at some time or another. That is just the nature for any herd animal, including a miniature horse. Scores of activities are present everyday in our lives and on our busy streets. Some of these actions, that have startled a guide horse, have been reported, although most of these facts are hidden from society. Once a horse has been spooked, it appears to remain anxious and nervous for a while.

It is stated by The Guide Horse Foundation program that a horse has an impeccable memory. If this is the case, it will remember such astonishing occurrences, making it an even more dangerous option for the blind. Any disabled or visually impaired person's greatest need is to be capable to entrust their life to their assistance guide animal. For years, Seeing Eye guide dogs have demonstrated and conveyed their dependability in unforeseen circumstances and can be totally relied on not to be frightened in any unpredicted dilemma.
7. The Guide Horse Foundation program is prohibited in taking possession of a guide horse after being placed with a visually impaired person.

Answer: False

The blind recipient has the entitlement to utilize the service of the horse for life, although, The Guide Horse Foundation does have the right to seize any horse under severe conditions such as abuse, neglect, or endangerment. According to Janet Burleson, "If the handler does not want to keep the horse for any reason, The Guide Horse Foundation will take the horse back.

When the horse is retired, the handler has the option of keeping it as a companion, or returning it to the foundation for retirement.

The handler does not have the right to sell the guide horse under any circumstances. However, we have the reassurance that each horse is going to a loving and committed home". The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) guarantees the right against discrimination to any individual with disabilities that employ an assistance animal.

This includes the use of all businesses that serve the public and transportation as well. However, this law may be changed in the future regarding an assistant guide horse.
8. A guide horse is not compatible with other animals, therefore, a blind handler is not allowed to have other pets.

Answer: False

A guide horse can be a companion with other house pets such as cats and small dogs. It is a good idea that any animal introductions be monitored to ensure this theory. Any large animal can be a grave threat to both, a Seeing Eye dog and a guide horse. For this matter, neither should be left alone with such menacing animals.

It is noted that a guide horse, as in other small-domesticated animals, can be housebroken. They are trained in a manner to alert the owner when nature calls. However, compared to dog feces, a horse's waste is much larger in comparison, both size and quantity.

It is suggested that a horse should not hold its excursions any longer than five hours. A dog can be more adjustable in this sector.
9. When a horse feels threatened, its first instinct is to take which of these actions?

Answer: run like hell

For any threatening incident, if their handler does not seem calm, both a dog and a horse will sense it from their owner. However, as long as the handler stays calm, chances are the horse might stay calm also. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. A dog's natural instinct is to protect its owner. Although a dog may usually opt to fight, it is intelligent enough to be able to monitor the circumstances and can be trusted for its judgment. A horse's instinct is to run.
10. The Board of the National Association of Guide Dog Users is thrilled about the mobility option that The Guide Horse Foundation program offers.

Answer: False

Many blind people feel that a miniature guide horse is an unwise method of assistance. In addition, they sense that they may become in jeopardy with public accommodations because of the animal's waste products. Editor, Eugenia Firth, from the "Braille Monitor" stated in an April 2001 edition, "Because of the relief problems, guide dog users may well face increased discrimination in restaurants, apartment buildings, and other. The Board of the National Association of Guide Dog Users has voted to bring a resolution opposing the Guide Horse Foundation and its activities to our convention this summer for consideration. We guide dog users must protect our rights or risk losing them". Of course, there are advantages and disadvantages in both assistance animals, but only the visually impaired know which choice of mobility option would best fit their individual needs. We will let them be the judge!

Resources include the following:
http://www.guidehorse.org
http://www.guidehorseno.com/summary.html
http://www.nfb.org/Images/nfb/Publications/bm/bm01/bm0104/bm010404.htm
www.ada.gov

"The official publication of the National Federation for the Blind does not endorse the use of horses as guide animals". For more information, contact the National Federation of the Blind, 1800 Johnson Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21230-4998, (410) 659-9314, fax (410) 685-5653.
Source: Author lilady

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor crisw before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
Most Recent Scores
Jan 05 2023 : Guest 65: 9/10
Dec 24 2022 : Ehmer1: 6/10
Dec 17 2022 : Lwright99: 6/10
Dec 10 2022 : Guest 24: 7/10
Dec 05 2022 : Guest 50: 7/10
Dec 01 2022 : Guest 12: 10/10

Score Distribution

quiz
1/30/2023, Copyright 2023 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us