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Quiz about The Dutch Revolt  Part 1 15551609
Quiz about The Dutch Revolt  Part 1 15551609

The Dutch Revolt : Part 1, 1555-1609 Quiz


This is about the first part of the Dutch Revolt. It covers the years from 1555 to 1609, when a truce was agreed. The fighting resumed later.

A multiple-choice quiz by mick_is_god. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Author
mick_is_god
Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
261,098
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
15
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
8 / 15
Plays
697
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. One of the reasons for the Dutch Revolt, although not necessarily the primary and only reason, was because of a small Protestant minority in the Netherlands. Which Protestant's doctrines did they follow? Hint

Hus
Luther
Calvin
Zwingli

2. As Philip II decided he couldn't control both Spain and the Netherlands, he appointed a governer to run the various regions instead. Whom did he appoint as the governor? Hint

Antoine Granvelle
Duke of Alba
Margaret of Parma
Count Egmont

3. In 1566, an event took place in the United Provinces that some historians believe triggered the revolt. Which event was this? Hint

Assassination of William the Silent
Appointment of Alva as governor
Iconoclastic Fury
Sacking of Antwerp

4. Philip sent the Duke of Alva as governor in 1567. However, this also proved to be a big mistake, destroying any remaining hopes of reconciliation. Which of these events made Alva hated throughout the Netherlands? Hint

All of them
Execution of Egmont and Hoorn
Tenth Penny Tax
Council of Troubles

5. As the Duke of Alva started to impose his authority on the Netherlands, William of Orange went into exile to avoid the same fate that had befallen Egmont and Hoorn. Where did William go into hiding? Hint

Saxony
Holland and Zealand
England
France

6. During the Dutch uprising between 1568-1571, Spain was also fighting another war that drained its resources, which hampered their efforts against the Dutch. Who else were the Spaniards fighting against? Hint

Ottoman Empire
England
France
Rebels in Peru

7. The rebels were given a major boost by the 'Sea Beggars' in 1572, who captured Brielle. But who were the 'Sea Beggars'? Hint

A group of nobles opposing Spanish rule
Pirates from England
Poor unemployed soldiers in ports
Calvinist prisoners and exiles

8. In 1576, an event called the Spanish Fury saw many people from the Low Countries take up the rebel cause. Which city did the rebels loot and pillage that saw 8,000 people allegedly killed? Hint

Amsterdam
Ghent
Brussels
Antwerp

9. After the death of Requesens in 1576, who was named as Governor? Hint

Count Peter Ernst von Mansfeld
Duke of Parma
Don John of Austria
Ernest of Austria

10. Which treaty did the Duke of Parma negotiate in 1579 to ensure the loyalty of some of the southern states, resulting in a split with the United Provinces? Hint

Union of Utrecht
Antwerp Agreement
Treaty of Vervins
Union of Arras

11. After the appointment of the Duke of Parma as governor, the Netherlands started to fight the Spanish army. Which foreign Duke was appointed by Orange to continue the struggle for the rebels? Hint

Duke of Anjou
Maurice of Nassau
Earl of Leicester
Earl of Warwick

12. Which event of 1584 signalled a low point in the rebels cause for independence? Hint

Assassination of William of Orange
Breakdown of relations between the Netherlands and England
Fall of Antwerp
Defeat of the Huguenots in France

13. In 1588, the Spanish declared war on another country. The result was a defeat that also hampered their fight in the Netherlands. Who did Spain declare war against? Hint

England
Denmark
France
Ottoman Empire

14. Now under the leadership of Maurice of Nassau, the rebel forces managed to make their way down south, liberating many towns from Spanish rule. Which of these towns was NOT liberated and stayed part of the Spanish Empire? Hint

Grave
Breda
Ghent
Groningen

15. The first stage of the Dutch Revolt ended in 1609. How long was the truce that took place before the fighting started again? Hint

10 years
7 years
14 years
12 years


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. One of the reasons for the Dutch Revolt, although not necessarily the primary and only reason, was because of a small Protestant minority in the Netherlands. Which Protestant's doctrines did they follow?

Answer: Calvin

Although most Netherlanders were deemed to be Roman Catholic at the time, there was a small but vocal group of Calvinists gathering in the country. With Philip II a devout Catholic, trying to impose strict religious conformity in the Netherlands, this was always going to create considerable difficulty.

Other problems that may have caused the revolt include the perception of unfair taxation and xenophobia from the Netherlands regions against the Spanish.
2. As Philip II decided he couldn't control both Spain and the Netherlands, he appointed a governer to run the various regions instead. Whom did he appoint as the governor?

Answer: Margaret of Parma

Philip II's illegitimate half-sister, Margaret of Parma, was appointed as governor of this part of the Spanish Empire, and Granvelle was appointed head of the States General, which was the Parliament of the Netherlands. Granvelle was a very unpopular man in the United Provinces at the time, so Philip and Margaret's association with him would always cause problems. One of Margaret's main mistakes was her over-reaction to the problem faced by her government in a letter to Philip, causing him to send the Duke of Alba to bring the area under control again, which made things worse. Alba took over as governor in 1569. Egmont was a Catholic statesman from Flanders who was executed by Alva, even though he almost certainly didn't want a revolt against Spain.
3. In 1566, an event took place in the United Provinces that some historians believe triggered the revolt. Which event was this?

Answer: Iconoclastic Fury

The Iconoclastic Fury occured as a result of the news in April 1566 that heresy laws against Calvinism wouldn't be monitored so harshly. This gave hope to the many French Huguenots, as they knew that local magistrates were prepared to overlook such practices. Buoyed by this news, Protestants started to hold open-air ceremonies in the United Provinces, and this eventually turned into the Iconoclastic Fury, which was the desecration of Catholic churches and images.

This unexpected event changed the direction of the revolt, turning it into a full-scale rebellion.

However, at this point William the Silent was still on the Spanish side. The sacking of Antwerp didn't occur until about ten years later.
4. Philip sent the Duke of Alva as governor in 1567. However, this also proved to be a big mistake, destroying any remaining hopes of reconciliation. Which of these events made Alva hated throughout the Netherlands?

Answer: All of them

Despite being an experienced leader, Alva fared badly as Governor-General of the Netherlands. He made the mistake of imprisoning and executing Dutch counts Egmont and Hoorn for their part in the discontent (even though both of them were Catholics and probably didn't want a full-scale rebellion).

This led William of Orange to become a rebel when he was still in doubt as to what to do. In 1568, Alva set up the Council of Troubles to try and root out heresy in the Netherlands, and thousands were executed as a result of this, including Egmont and Hoorn. Alva also tried to raise money by imposing the Tenth Penny tax, where every tenth penny of sales was given to the government, but even the Catholic Netherlanders opposed this, and as businesses closed down in opposition, this caused much of the Netherlands to come to an economic standstill.
5. As the Duke of Alva started to impose his authority on the Netherlands, William of Orange went into exile to avoid the same fate that had befallen Egmont and Hoorn. Where did William go into hiding?

Answer: Saxony

William never actually directly opposed Philip II in his early years, but he opposed the idea of Spaniards obtaining power in his country rather than Dutch people. William's wife was Anna of Saxony, so he was able to stay in the region that was ruled by his wife's father, who had the title of Elector of Saxony. France was still under Catholic rule, so it wasn't safe for William to take refuge here. England wasn't an option either because Elizabeth I was reluctant to support the rebels because no-one believed they had a chance of victory. Holland and Zealand were under the jurisdiction of Spain, so this also wasn't a very safe option.
6. During the Dutch uprising between 1568-1571, Spain was also fighting another war that drained its resources, which hampered their efforts against the Dutch. Who else were the Spaniards fighting against?

Answer: Ottoman Empire

Peru was a Spanish colony, but a revolt didn't take place in the country for over 200 years after it was conquered by Spain. Although Philip detested any country that had a Protestant ruler, he never actually declared war on the English until the 1580s, and although Philip gave a lot of financial aid to the Catholics in the French Wars of Religion, he didn't interfere in the fighting. Spanish interference in both countries would affect Spain later on, but the fighting against the Ottoman Empire was the main problem the Spaniards faced between 1568 and 1571.

This eased when Don John secured a decisive victory against the Ottoman Empire in 1571 at the Battle of Lepanto. Don John would later try to deal with the United Provinces, with little success.
7. The rebels were given a major boost by the 'Sea Beggars' in 1572, who captured Brielle. But who were the 'Sea Beggars'?

Answer: A group of nobles opposing Spanish rule

The 'Sea Beggars' were named after a large group of nobles presented a petition to Margaret of Parma, and one of her councillors was heard to call them a group of beggars. After originally being supressed by Alba, the 'Sea Beggars' were successful in plundering Spanish ships and ports and returning to England.

However, in 1572, Elizabeth I refused them entry to her harbours, as she didn't want to provoke Spain. This led the 'Sea Beggars' to launch a desperate attack on Brielle, and later Flushing, which were under Spanish control. Because they were so unexpected, both attacks succeeded, and eventually they spread resistance southwards, dealing a massive blow to the Duke of Alba and Spain.
8. In 1576, an event called the Spanish Fury saw many people from the Low Countries take up the rebel cause. Which city did the rebels loot and pillage that saw 8,000 people allegedly killed?

Answer: Antwerp

The Spanish Fury took place in Antwerp after Philip declared the Spanish state bankrupt in 1575. Spanish troops fighting against the rebels were given no leave and no pay, and the the distance from Spain to the Low Countries added to their grievances. Because of this, the Sack of Antwerp took place in November 1576. Spanish troops decided to 'pay themselves' by pillaging the city that was the economic capital of the Netherlands.

The population of Antwerp had plummeted to 40,000 by 1585, with this event alienating many Dutch people who were loyal to Philip, particularly Catholics.

It also meant that any remaining hope of peace had all but vanished.
9. After the death of Requesens in 1576, who was named as Governor?

Answer: Don John of Austria

The Duke of Parma followed the victor at Lepanto, Don John of Austria, into the position of Governor. Don John tried to negotiate a peace treaty with William the Silent many times, but William didn't believe he was trustworthy, and he was later proved right. Don John only lasted two years before he died of typhus, but he wasn't the most successful of governors.

He didn't get along very well with Philip II, and he wasn't received well by the States General and the people of the United Provinces. He was an example of another excellent general who had blackened his reputation in the Netherlands, like Alba.
10. Which treaty did the Duke of Parma negotiate in 1579 to ensure the loyalty of some of the southern states, resulting in a split with the United Provinces?

Answer: Union of Arras

The Union of Arras was signed in 1579 and recognised Philip II as the lawful ruler of these states. One of the key conditions of the agreement was that Catholicism was deemed to be the only lawful religion, and that Calvinism was outlawed. It was from here that the Duke of Parma started his reconquest of the central and Northern states of the Netherlands.

The Union of Utrecht was signed by the rebel states not long afterwards, and covered most of the nothern Netherlands states.
11. After the appointment of the Duke of Parma as governor, the Netherlands started to fight the Spanish army. Which foreign Duke was appointed by Orange to continue the struggle for the rebels?

Answer: Duke of Anjou

Maurice of Nassau was never a reasonable choice, as he was William's son. Nevertheless, Maurice took over from William after his father's death and proved to be a key figure in the outcome of the Dutch Revolt. The Earl of Leicester also came in after the death of William the Silent, whilst the Earl of Warwick never featured in the Dutch Revolt.

As for the Duke of Anjou, he was only slightly more popular than Alva was in the Netherlands after his appointment. The Dutch were unhappy that a French Duke was chosen to free them, and the Duke had to try to take Antwerp and other cities by force, failing to in the case of Antwerp. Holland and Zealand even refused to recognise Anjou as their leader.
12. Which event of 1584 signalled a low point in the rebels cause for independence?

Answer: Assassination of William of Orange

All of these would have been a setback for the rebels, but William's assassination was the only event that took place in 1584. William was assassinated by a Catholic fanatic called Balthasar Gerard, after Philip II offered a reward for his murder. He never escaped the Low Countries, and instead suffered a painful execution.

The Huguenots in France weren't actually defeated until the 17th century, and the Fall of Antwerp was earlier. As for the breakdown in relations between the Netherlands and England, this never really took place during the Dutch Revolt.
13. In 1588, the Spanish declared war on another country. The result was a defeat that also hampered their fight in the Netherlands. Who did Spain declare war against?

Answer: England

1588 was the year of the unsuccessful Spanish Armada against England, which severely hit the Spanish fight in the Netherlands. The French campaign probably had more effect, but the role that Alessandro Farnese (the Duke of Parma) had to play in the Armada started the downfall, as it led to the Dutch regrouping. Parma was ordered into France in 1589 after the death of the French king.

The wars with the Ottoman Empire had died down by this point.
14. Now under the leadership of Maurice of Nassau, the rebel forces managed to make their way down south, liberating many towns from Spanish rule. Which of these towns was NOT liberated and stayed part of the Spanish Empire?

Answer: Ghent

The activity of the Dutch rebels was largely confined to the modern day Netherlands area, so Ghent, which is now in Belgium, wasn't recaptured. Breda was conquered again in 1590, Groningen in 1594 and Grave in 1602.
15. The first stage of the Dutch Revolt ended in 1609. How long was the truce that took place before the fighting started again?

Answer: 12 years

The main reason that the Dutch had for calling a truce to the revolt was so that they could rebuild their navy, so that they were better prepared the next time they went to war with Spain. It was unlikely that the Twelve Year Truce was anything but a ceasefire before the next war started, although neither side knew when fighting would be renewed of course.

The Dutch would go on to gain independence for the land that now makes up the modern day Netherlands, whereas the Spanish kept hold of the lands that are now modern day Belgium, and parts of France and Luxembourg.
Source: Author mick_is_god

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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