Quiz about Toys Toys Toys
Quiz about Toys Toys Toys

Toys! Toys! Toys! Trivia Quiz


Like any other child growing up in the late '80s/early '90s, I had certain toys and games that I loved. This quiz is about some of them. Note: there is a slight UK bias.

A multiple-choice quiz by Kankurette. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
Kankurette
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
404,995
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
419
Last 3 plays: agentofchaos (10/10), Guest 216 (7/10), Guest 162 (8/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. Although I found Lego a bit fiddly, Lego also manufactured a range of bricks which were bigger and easier to play with (and harder for a small child to swallow!) and I had a lot of fun building things with them. What is the name of these chunky bricks? Hint

Ninjago
Duplo
Trio
Bongo

2. I had a red and white robot called a Dingbot. It had a map, which it held in its claw-like hands, and moved around the room until it bumped into something, which made it change direction. Which Japanese company, who later merged with Takara, manufactured the Dingbot? Hint

Sanrio
Nintendo
Bandai
Tomy

3. One board game my brother and I loved involved a wind-up toy dinosaur. Each player had a family of cave people, and they had to get the cave people home to their cave in the middle of the board while avoiding the dinosaur. If you rolled the dice and got a dinosaur, the dinosaur would be let loose onto the board! What was the name of this game? Hint

Look Out, There's a T-Rex Coming!
Beware of the Brontosaurus
Cave-In
Dizzy Dizzy Dinosaur

4. Now much coveted by toy collectors, these cute little families of woodland creatures were favourite toys of mine. There were cats, rabbits, badgers, hedgehogs and bears, and they all wore clothes and had names (though I gave them names of my own). They had a dolls' house to live in, a red bus and a picnic set, amongst other things. Which toys am I referring to? Hint

Moldavian Families
Belgravian Families
Syldavian Families
Sylvanian Families

5. I was a bit of a tomboy and not into girly toys as a rule, but there were a few exceptions, such as a range of cutesy animal toys which could be opened with a key, while smaller ones had slits on their backs. You could use them to store or hide small things. (Mine was a pink rabbit.) Which toys were these? Hint

Cupboarders
Keypers
Storers
Guarders

6. I had many soft toys as a child, and still have some of them today, such as Martha, my beloved teddy bear. One of these toys is a glove puppet called Zippy, a character from the retro TV show 'Rainbow'. What unusual feature did Zippy have? Hint

Glow-in-the-dark fur
Eyes that changed colour
A zippable mouth
A voice box

7. Another of my favourite childhood games, which I used to play with my dad, featured a toy mule, and the object of the game was to see how many items you could load onto the mule's back before it reared up. What was the name of the game? Hint

Buckaroo!
Rodeo!
Clarence the Angry Mule
Kickback

8. Their names were Howler, Grizzler, Fang and Gums. They were soft toys with a frightening secret - if you turned their heads inside out, they became monsters! The story was that they and their maker had been placed under a curse. What type of 'were' animals were they? Hint

WereBears
WereHogs
WereRabbits
WereCats

9. Plenty of girls in the '90s owned one of these dolls. She was a tiny little doll who lived in a plastic case, which would open up into a dolls' house or another variant, such as a make-up kit (which I had). What was the name of this doll, who also had her own TV series in 2018? Hint

Polly Pocket
Rosie Rocket
Lucy Locket
Sally Sockit

10. I had a few Barbie dolls as a child, but I also had three dolls who I liked because they were a bit unusual - not only did they have a food theme, big colourful hats and an individual scent, but they also had plastic skirts which could be flipped up to turn them into something else. Which dolls were these? Hint

Poundcakes
Fruitcakes
Cupcakes
Fairycakes


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Although I found Lego a bit fiddly, Lego also manufactured a range of bricks which were bigger and easier to play with (and harder for a small child to swallow!) and I had a lot of fun building things with them. What is the name of these chunky bricks?

Answer: Duplo

Lego Duplo, to give the range its full name, is a range of large Lego bricks aimed at children between 1-and-a-half and 5 years old, as they are larger than normal Lego bricks and present less of a choking hazard. They were first introduced in 1969 and only came in red, yellow, blue or white, but over the years, the range of colours and shapes were expanded, and also included people figures and trains.

The name 'Duplo' comes from 'duplus', the Latin word for 'double', because the bricks are twice the size of Lego bricks.

In 1977, the range's name was changed to 'Lego Preschool', but got its original name back two years later; a short-lived name change to 'Explore' also occurred in 2002.
2. I had a red and white robot called a Dingbot. It had a map, which it held in its claw-like hands, and moved around the room until it bumped into something, which made it change direction. Which Japanese company, who later merged with Takara, manufactured the Dingbot?

Answer: Tomy

Tomy Company, known as Takara Tomy in Japan after the merger with rivals Takara in 2006, is based in Tokyo and produces and markets a wide range of toys, both toys of its own and tie-ins with other series such as 'Naruto', 'Zoids' and 'Thomas the Tank Engine'.

In the '80s, it marketed a range of robots known as Omnibots, which had cassette recorders in their chests. My adorable little robot, Dingbot, was considerably less sophisticated, but had a charm of its own; it moved its head, made funny little robot noises, and rolled around the room bumping into objects, and then promptly changing direction.

It was based on ET and originally made for a Japanese whisky advert. Other similar robots included Ding-Bo and OMS-B.
3. One board game my brother and I loved involved a wind-up toy dinosaur. Each player had a family of cave people, and they had to get the cave people home to their cave in the middle of the board while avoiding the dinosaur. If you rolled the dice and got a dinosaur, the dinosaur would be let loose onto the board! What was the name of this game?

Answer: Dizzy Dizzy Dinosaur

'Dizzy Dizzy Dinosaur' was created by MB Games and pretty much did what it said on the tin. You had four families of cave people, one blue, one yellow, one red and one green. Each family consisted of a mother, father, boy, girl and baby, and you had to get each family member in turn to the cave in the middle of the board; the winner was the one whose entire family got home safe first.

However, there was a spanner in the works in the form of Dizzy Dinosaur. The game had two dice, and each die had five numbers and a dinosaur head. If you rolled a dinosaur, you would have to wind up the dinosaur and let him loose after advancing the number of spaces on the other die, and if he knocked your piece off the board, you had to go back to the start. Woe betide you if you rolled TWO dinosaurs (and this did happen to me a couple of times) - you had to unleash the green beast twice!
4. Now much coveted by toy collectors, these cute little families of woodland creatures were favourite toys of mine. There were cats, rabbits, badgers, hedgehogs and bears, and they all wore clothes and had names (though I gave them names of my own). They had a dolls' house to live in, a red bus and a picnic set, amongst other things. Which toys am I referring to?

Answer: Sylvanian Families

Sylvanian Families are families of anthropomorphic animal figurines originally from Japan. As well as the families themselves, you could also buy accessories such as furniture, the above mentioned house and bus, or boats. The families were originally nuclear families but were later expanded to include grandparents and babies, and plenty of non-woodland creatures such as meerkats, penguins and kangaroos were later added to the range along with the usual rabbits, bears and so on.

The critters have amassed quite the cult following, and collectors will scour the internet for rare toys.

In Japan, they have a sizeable following; there are various cartoons and video games based on the toys, and there's even a Sylvanian Families village in the GrinPa theme park in Susono. If, like me, you have a dark sense of humour, you might enjoy the 'Forest Friends' Twitter which has photos of Sylvanian Families with rude captions, but it is NOT child-friendly!
5. I was a bit of a tomboy and not into girly toys as a rule, but there were a few exceptions, such as a range of cutesy animal toys which could be opened with a key, while smaller ones had slits on their backs. You could use them to store or hide small things. (Mine was a pink rabbit.) Which toys were these?

Answer: Keypers

Keypers were made by Tonka and came in two varieties, the large ones (which could be opened with a key) and the small ones (which had a slit on their backs, like a piggy bank). They came with small trinkets such as key rings and hairbrushes. The first series of Keypers included a kangaroo, a tortoise and a penguin, while the second series included a cat, a bear and a dog, and were more colourful.

The third series included Musical and Jewellery Keypers. The Keyper I had was called Joyful Rabbit; she was one of the larger Keypers from the second series, a pink rabbit in a wedding dress with a heart motif and a veil.

The Keypers also came with small friends known as 'Finders' (Joyful's was a little pink guy called Bowtie). Fans of the Welsh band Catatonia might recall that a snail Keyper appeared on one of their earliest EPs, 'Hooked', and the compilation album '93-94'.
6. I had many soft toys as a child, and still have some of them today, such as Martha, my beloved teddy bear. One of these toys is a glove puppet called Zippy, a character from the retro TV show 'Rainbow'. What unusual feature did Zippy have?

Answer: A zippable mouth

Glove puppets - of which I had a few - are puppets which the puppeteer wears on their hand like a glove, and they put their fingers in the puppet's arms and sometimes its head as well. Zippy was one of three puppet characters on 'Rainbow', a kids' TV show which ran from 1972 to 1992, along with George, a camp pink hippo, and Bungle, a bear.

He was so-called because he had a mouth that could be zipped up, something that the other characters on the show took advantage of whenever he got too obnoxious. Both Zippy and George were voiced on the show by Roy Skelton, who also voiced the Daleks on 'Doctor Who'. Zippy has also appeared in various TV adverts.
7. Another of my favourite childhood games, which I used to play with my dad, featured a toy mule, and the object of the game was to see how many items you could load onto the mule's back before it reared up. What was the name of the game?

Answer: Buckaroo!

'Buckaroo!' was made by Milton Bradley and instead of being a board game, it involved a toy mule called Roo with a spring mechanism inside it which would cause it to rear up when triggered. You had several plastic items, such as a saddle, bedroll, rope and stick of dynamite, and the aim was to see how many of these things you could put on the mule's back before it reared up and threw everything off.

The saddle, as the largest object, always had to go on first. As soon as a player caused the mule to buck, they were out of the game and the winner was the one who put the most items on the mule.

A lever under the mule's belly enabled players to change the sensitivity levels. (Incidentally, my mum bought me an anniversary version for my birthday a few years ago, but I have yet to play it.)
8. Their names were Howler, Grizzler, Fang and Gums. They were soft toys with a frightening secret - if you turned their heads inside out, they became monsters! The story was that they and their maker had been placed under a curse. What type of 'were' animals were they?

Answer: WereBears

The WereBears were created by cartoonist George Nicholas, who came up with the idea because he wanted boys to be able to have teddy bears without being bullied. I had Grizzler, who was yellow and wore a green-and-white striped jumper, while my brother had Howler, who was light blue and wore yellow shorts. Fang was red and yellow, wore blue shorts and a blue baseball cap, and had a single fang, while Gums was toothless, dark blue and pink, and wore red shorts.

The WereBears looked like ordinary teddy bears, but their heads could be turned inside out to reveal a more frightening face. Each WereBear came with a tape narrated by Oliver Postgate of 'Bagpuss' fame: one side explained the origin story of the bears, while the other featured a story starring that particular bear.

A fifth bear, Growler, was released in 1986, along with another line of creepy bears called Terror Teds. Growler was orange and pink and had a badge which made a howling noise.
9. Plenty of girls in the '90s owned one of these dolls. She was a tiny little doll who lived in a plastic case, which would open up into a dolls' house or another variant, such as a make-up kit (which I had). What was the name of this doll, who also had her own TV series in 2018?

Answer: Polly Pocket

Polly Pocket was originally made by a British company, Bluebird Toys, and were conceived by Chris Wiggs, who wanted to create a doll small enough to fit in a pocket, but who had worlds of her own to play in. He created a tiny doll for his daughter and made a house for it using a compact, and Polly Pocket was born.

The tiny dolls were housed in cases, some of which were like miniature houses, and the dolls' feet could be placed into recesses in the floor. Some of the houses were rings or pendants; my make-up compact, with garish lipstick and eyeshadow, was shaped like a seashell. Mattel eventually acquired Bluebird Toys in 1998 and completely revamped the Polly Pocket range, making larger dolls with plastic clothes. Male dolls were also added to the range. Mattel discontinued the toys in 2015, but they made a comeback in 2018, reverting to the old style, albeit with dolls that could sit in chairs.

The Bluebird toys are now considered to be rare collectibles.
10. I had a few Barbie dolls as a child, but I also had three dolls who I liked because they were a bit unusual - not only did they have a food theme, big colourful hats and an individual scent, but they also had plastic skirts which could be flipped up to turn them into something else. Which dolls were these?

Answer: Cupcakes

The Cupcakes were made by Tonka and were dolls with wide crinoline-like skirts (but no legs!) and big broad hats attached with ribbons or an elasticated chin strap, which resembled icing. If you flipped up the doll's skirt, you could turn it into a cake.

There were originally three ranges: Cutie Fruti, which had a fruit theme, Sugar 'n' Shine, which had sparkly dresses, pink hats and wore glittery make-up, and Sweet Treat (Candy Sprinkle) which had a dessert theme, patterned gauze dresses, and a particularly sweet smell. I had Grape Suzette from the Cutie Fruti range, who had a purple colour scheme, brown hair with a purple streak and grapes on her hat; Honey Drop from the Sugar 'n' Shine range, who had red hair and a glittery blue dress; and Bon Bon from the Sweet Treat range, who had a turquoise and violet colour scheme and diamonds on her dress.

Other variations included Princess Parfait, which had longer skirts shaped like parfait glasses; Jam Pops, which had a fruit theme and could be pushed down into their skirts to form jam jars; Tropical Treat, which were brightly coloured, had crimped hair and a tropical theme; and Cotton Candy, which had fur muffs and fur trim on their dresses.
Source: Author Kankurette

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor WesleyCrusher before going online.
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