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Quiz about The Total Experience  Your LA Dodgers
Quiz about The Total Experience  Your LA Dodgers

The Total Experience - Your LA Dodgers Quiz


This quiz will cover the first 50 years (1958-2008) of the Los Angeles Dodgers franchise and the Dodger Stadium experience. Things you know and perhaps a few things you don't know are included. Good luck -- and, "It's Time for Dodger Baseball".

A multiple-choice quiz by MaceoMack. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
MaceoMack
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
358,930
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
297
Last 3 plays: Guest 71 (9/10), Guest 166 (2/10), Guest 24 (5/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. On April 18, 1958, The Dodgers baseball club, formerly from the Flatbush section of Brooklyn in New York, played their first game on the Pacific Coast as the Los Angeles Dodgers. What venue served as the site for the opening day game? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Who was the owner of the Dodgers that spearheaded the move of the team from Brooklyn to Los Angeles? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. From the first Dodgers' game played in Los Angeles (1958), until the end of the 2008 season (50 years later), who managed the team for the most number of full seasons? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Between 1958 and 2008, which American League team did NOT face the Los Angeles Dodgers in post season World Series Play? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. The Los Angeles Dodgers has always been known for their strong pitching staff. From 1958 through 2008, which team pitcher recorded the most victories? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Since opening day at Dodger Stadium in 1962, Bob Mitchell, Chauncey Haines, Don Beamsley, Helen Dell, and Nancy Bea Hefley have (at different times) worked in a stadium position that enhanced the overall Dodgers' experience for millions of fans and visitors attending home games. What job title did they share? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Primarily known for their pitching, the Los Angeles Dodgers produced a number of fine hitters in their first five decades as well. During those 50 years, which Los Angeles Dodgers slugging star has been responsible for the most home runs? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. The first 50 years, 1958 to 2008- during those 50 years the organization produced twelve "Rookie of the Year" players, the most for any major league team during that time frame. Which Los Angeles Dodgers' player was NOT named a season Rookie of the Year? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. What distinction do former Los Angeles Dodgers' players Frank Robinson, Dusty Baker, Jeff Torborg, and Mike Scioscia share? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Working as a baseball scout, a coach, a manager, and a front office executive, Tommy Lasorda was one of two people to have spent 50 years in the Los Angeles Dodgers' organization. What was the job title of the other person? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Jun 21 2024 : Guest 71: 9/10
May 25 2024 : Guest 166: 2/10
May 17 2024 : Guest 24: 5/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. On April 18, 1958, The Dodgers baseball club, formerly from the Flatbush section of Brooklyn in New York, played their first game on the Pacific Coast as the Los Angeles Dodgers. What venue served as the site for the opening day game?

Answer: Los Angeles Coliseum

From the opening day game in 1958 until the end of the 1961 season, the new LA Dodgers called the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum their home field. The Coliseum, built in 1923 and designed to accommodate the 1932 Summer Olympic games and football events was not truly suited as a baseball venue. The distance from home plate to the left field wall was only 251 feet. Center field was 417 feet, and the right field line was 300 feet. The distances in left center field and right center field were 320 and 375 feet, respectively.

The size of the Coliseum afforded the largest ever baseball venue. In an exhibition game held on May 7, 1959 between the Dodgers and the New York Yankees, a record crowd of 93,103 spectators filled the Coliseum to honor beloved Dodger catcher Roy Campanella, who was permanently paralyzed in an automobile accident on January 28, 1958. This marked the largest crowd to witness a baseball game in the Western Hemisphere. Unfortunately, in the game, the Dodgers were defeated by a six to two score. In addition to the 1959 Major League Baseball All-Star Game, three games of the 1959 World Series between the Dodgers and the Chicago White Sox were played in the Coliseum. Each of the three games drew in excess of 92,706 cheering fans.

In a 2008 exhibition game between the Dodgers and the Boston Red Sox to commemorate the Dodgers 50 year anniversary in Los Angeles, 115,300 fans filled the Coliseum, establishing a record crowd for viewing a baseball game.
2. Who was the owner of the Dodgers that spearheaded the move of the team from Brooklyn to Los Angeles?

Answer: Walter F. O'Malley

The Brooklyn Dodgers played their final game in Ebbets Field on September 24, 1957, defeating the Pittsburgh Pirates by a score of 2 to 0. Unable to broker a deal during the 1950s with New York officials to build a new and modern domed stadium in Brooklyn for the Dodgers, owner Walter F. O'Malley announced on October 8, 1957, that the Dodgers would be moving to Los Angeles. O'Malley's decision effectively ended a 68 year relationship with the fans in Brooklyn and New York.

In October of 1950, Walter F. O'Malley purchased the shares of Dodgers co-owners Branch Rickey and John L. Smith, becoming the chief shareholder and president of the Dodgers organization.
3. From the first Dodgers' game played in Los Angeles (1958), until the end of the 2008 season (50 years later), who managed the team for the most number of full seasons?

Answer: Tommy Lasorda

Tommy Lasorda skippered the Los Angeles Dodgers for 20 seasons (1976-1996).

Legendary Dodgers manager Walter Alston actually managed the team for a longer time, 23 seasons from 1954-1976, but his first four seasons at the helm of the team (1954-1957) were when the Dodgers played in Brooklyn.
Lasorda accomplished the rare feat of managing pennant winning teams during his first two seasons (1977 & 1978).
During his tenure as manager, Lasorda recorded a record of 1599 wins and 1439 losses.
Lasorda led teams recorded World Series Championships in 1981 and 1988. Lasorda teams also captured four National League Pennants and eight division titles.

In 1983, the Major League Baseball "Manager of the Year" award was established by Major League Baseball. Tommy Lasorda became the first recipient of the award for the National League. Lasorda was again honored with the award in 1988.

Following his retirement and in his first year of eligibility for induction into the National Baseball Hall of Fame (1997), Tommy Lasorda was inducted as a manager.
On August 15, 1997, Tommy Lasorda was honored by the Dodgers organization with the retirement of his jersey number "2", an honor afforded only ten times in the history of the Dodgers organization.
Lasorda number #2 joined the rarefied status of elite Dodger greats including #1, Pee Wee Reese, #4, Duke Snider, #19, Jim Gilliam, #20, Don Sutton, #24, Walter Alston, #32, Sandy Koufax, #39, Roy Campanella, #42, Jackie Robinson, and #53, Don Drysdale.
4. Between 1958 and 2008, which American League team did NOT face the Los Angeles Dodgers in post season World Series Play?

Answer: Kansas City Athletics

The Los Angeles Dodgers faced the Athletics baseball club in the Fall classic in both 1974 and 1988, however both contest occurred after the Athletics left Kansas City for Oakland.

During the first fifty years of the Los Angeles Dodgers legacy, they were involved in seven World Series, emerging as World Champions on five occasions.

In 1959, the Dodgers won four of six games from the Chicago White Sox. Dodger pitcher Larry Sherry was voted the series MVP after winning two games and saving two games.

In 1963, The Dodgers sweep their arch-rivals, the New York Yankees in four games. Sandy Koufax was named series MVP having pitched two complete games in the series.

In 1965, the Dodgers bested the Minnesota Twins in seven games. Sandy Koufax was named series MVP after winning two games, the second and series deciding game being a shut-out and complete game.

The 1966 World Series saw the Dodgers loose four straight games to the Baltimore Orioles.

In 1974, the Oakland Athletics beat the Dodgers in five games.

1977 saw a rematch of the Dodgers and the Yankees in the Fall Classic.
The Dodgers won four of six games to capture the World Championship. MVP honors for the series were shared by Dodgers third baseman Ron Cey, Dodgers outfielder Pedro Guerrero, and Dodgers catcher Steve Yeager.

In 1988, the Dodgers were victorious over the Oakland Athletics, winning the series in five games. Two complete games were pitched by Orel Hershiser, who also captured the series MVP award.

Perhaps one of the most memorable events in Dodger history came on October 15, 1988 during game one of the series. With the Dodgers trailing the A's 4 to 3 in the bottom of the ninth inning with two outs, Dodger outfielder Mike Davis drew a walk and stole second base. Kirk Gibson who was asked to pinch hit, was not in the starting lineup due to injuries to both legs that made it difficult for him to walk, let alone play.

On a 3-2 count, Gibson hit a home run over the right field wall, winning the game for the Dodgers. Most Dodgers fans fondly remember the image of Gibson as he hobbled rounding third base, pumping his arm in victory.

The play-by-play call made on national television (NBC-TV) ranks among the most exciting moments in Dodgers history. Vin Scully described the play as a "High fly ball into right field ... she-is-gone!". In his impeccable style, Scully remained silent for over a minute, allowing the viewers to take in the pandemonium of the moment as the crowd wildly cheered. Scully then stated words that have been etched into the memories of Dodger fans, "In a year that has been so improbable, the impossible has happened".
5. The Los Angeles Dodgers has always been known for their strong pitching staff. From 1958 through 2008, which team pitcher recorded the most victories?

Answer: Don Sutton

In his 16 total seasons with the Dodgers, Don Sutton recorded 233 wins and 181 losses. A strong right hander, Sutton appeared in 550 games, with starting pitcher assignments in 533. Sutton's career ERA as a Dodger was 3.09. Sutton accumulated 2,696 strikeouts during hos Dodgers career.

Right handed pitcher Don Drysdale recorded 187 wins and 152 losses as a member of the Los Angeles dodgers. Not counted in this statistic are the 22 wins and 14 losses Drysdale had playing in 1956 and 1957 as a Brooklyn Dodger. As a Los Angeles Dodger, Drysdale appeared in 559 games, starting 424 of them.
Drysdale recorded 2,283 strikeouts.

As a Los Angeles Dodger, left handed pitching ace Sandy Koufax recorded 153 wins and 77 loses in 9 seasons. Not included are the three seasons Koufax played as a Brooklyn Dodger. With the Los Angeles Dodgers, Koufax appeared in 355 games, drawing the starting assignment on 286 occasions. Koufax struck out 2,214 batters in his nine seasons in Los Angeles. Chronic pain in his pitching arm cut short what most Dodger fans agree was a brilliant career.

Southpaw pitching sensation Fernando Valenzuela pitched for the Los Angeles Dodgers for 11 seasons, winning 141 and loosing 116 games. Valenzuela, a strong right handed pitcher started 320 of the 331 games he appear in. During his career as a Dodger, he struck out 1,759 batters.
6. Since opening day at Dodger Stadium in 1962, Bob Mitchell, Chauncey Haines, Don Beamsley, Helen Dell, and Nancy Bea Hefley have (at different times) worked in a stadium position that enhanced the overall Dodgers' experience for millions of fans and visitors attending home games. What job title did they share?

Answer: In-House Stadium Musician

Fans attending home games at Dodger Stadium have been serenaded with the rich quality tones of uplifting music, provided by the in-house stadium musician, playing the organ. Organ music at the ballparks was considered by many baseball purist as a quintessential element of the overall experience of attending a live professional baseball game.

For the first game played in the newly constructed Dodger Stadium in 1962, Robert "Bob" Mitchell electrified the crowd on a Wurlitzer double keyboard organ with a medley of rousing musical selections for their enjoyment.

Dodger Stadium features pregame music during batting practice, the playing of the National Anthem to start the game, music during the seventh inning stretch, including the traditional song "Take Me Out To The Ballgame", and 30 minutes of music following the game while the crowd exits the stadium and parking lots. Music played during the game included Dodgers rally tunes, the traditional rally "Charge" tune, and other music to stimulate and entertain the crowd between innings and during pauses in game play.

Bob Mitchell could be found behind the keyboards at Dodger Stadium from 1962 until 1966. From 1966 through 1970, the organ was played by Chauncey Haines and Don Beamsley. Helen Dell, playing the Hammond Organ, took over the job in 1970, and delighted stadium fans for the next 18 seasons. Upon her retirement at the end of the 1988 season, Nancy Bea Hefley took the assignment, performing through the 2008 season. Unfortunately for many of the die hard Dodger Stadium truest, much of the organ music has been replaced with prerecorded canned music and sound effects. The Dodger organization has maintained a commitment to their fans to continue, on a smaller scale, traditional organ music entertainment in the stadium.
7. Primarily known for their pitching, the Los Angeles Dodgers produced a number of fine hitters in their first five decades as well. During those 50 years, which Los Angeles Dodgers slugging star has been responsible for the most home runs?

Answer: Eric Karros

Eric Karros, who spent the first 12 years of his 14 year career in baseball with the Los Angeles Dodgers, led Los Angeles Dodger hitters with 270 home runs.
In 1992, his first full season with the Dodgers, his first at bat for the season was against San Diego Padres pitcher Craig Lefferts. Karros swatted a 2 run home run over the left field wall. As a Dodger, Karros played first base and wore uniform jersey number 23.

Steve Garvey played 17 seasons (1969-1982) with the Los Angeles Dodgers, and hit 211 home runs for "The Boys in Blue". Garvey was known both as a dependable hitter and as the "Ironman" of the team. From 1975 through 1983, Garvey played in 1,207 consecutive games, establishing record for a player in the Dodger organization. Garvey was a fixture at first base for the Dodgers, and wore uniform jersey number 6.

Dodgers outfielder Pedro Guerrero hit 171 home runs during his 11 seasons with the Los Angeles Dodgers. Guerrero was known to be an aggressive baseball player and became the first in Dodgers history to hit 30 homeruns and steal 20 bases in a single season. Guerrero repeated the feat the following season. In June of 1885, Guerrero tied a major league baseball record when hi hit 15 homers during the month. Guerrero's batting average for hos Dodger career was .309. Guerrero played the outfield for the majority of his Dodgers year. Guerrero had limited experience in the infield playing both third and first base. During his first two seasons (1978 & 1979), Guerrero wore uniform jersey number 57, but for the majority of his Dodgers tenure (1980-1988), he wore jersey number 28.

During his eight years with the Dodgers (1959-1966), Tommy Davis was always considered a long ball threat when he stepped up to the plate. Davis hit a total of 86 home runs during his Dodger career. In his rookie year (1960), Davis has an impressive batting average of .276. Davis won back-to-back National League batting titles in 1962 and 1963, with batting averages of .346 and .326, respectively. Tommy Davis played Left Field for the Dodgers and wore team jersey number 12.
8. The first 50 years, 1958 to 2008- during those 50 years the organization produced twelve "Rookie of the Year" players, the most for any major league team during that time frame. Which Los Angeles Dodgers' player was NOT named a season Rookie of the Year?

Answer: Maury Wills

Without question, one of the most popular players to wear a Dodger uniform was Maury Wills. Wills served as the Dodger shortstop, leadoff hitter, and team captain during his career while wearing Dodger Blue. In 1960, his first full season, he recorded a batting average of .295, and lead the league in stolen bases with 50. Maury Wills did not win the "Rookie of the Year" award in his first season.

During the first 50 years of Los Angeles Dodgers baseball (1958-2008), the organization lead the major leagues in the production of Rookie of the Year award winners with 12. The next organization on the list was the Cincinnati Reds, who produced six Rookie of the Year players during that time frame.

Los Angeles Dodger Rookie of the Year players were Frank Howard (1960), Jim Lefebvre (1965), Ted Sizemore (1969), Rick Sutcliffe (1979), Steve Howe (1980), Fernando Valenzuela (1981), Steve Sax (1982), Eric Karros (1992), Mike Piazza (1993), Raul Mondesi (1994), Hideo Nomo (1995), and Todd Hollingsworth (1996).
9. What distinction do former Los Angeles Dodgers' players Frank Robinson, Dusty Baker, Jeff Torborg, and Mike Scioscia share?

Answer: Voted a league " Manager of the Year"

These former Dodger players represent proof positive that there is life and success in baseball after they retire their Dodger blue uniforms. Each player went on not only to manage a Major League ball club, by they were recognized as a baseball "Manager of the Year".

Former two time all-star Dodger catcher Mike Scioscia went on the manage the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. Scioscia, who played for the Dodgers from 1980-1992, took over the helm of the Angels in in 2000. He was named American League Manager of the Year both in 2002 and 2009.

Two time all-star and Gold Glove outfielder Dusty Baker, who played for the Dodgers from 1976 through 1983, manager the San Francisco Giants from 1993 through 2002. A three time winner of the National League Manager of the Year award, Baker was recognized in 1993, 1997, and 2000. Baker also managed the Chicago Cubs from 2003-2006, and took over managerial duties with the Cincinnati Red in 2008.

Baseball Hall-of-Fame outfielder Frank Robinson played a single season (1972) with the Dodgers. Upon his retirement as a player, Robinson went on to manage four Major League teams. Robinson managed the Baltimore Orioles from 1988-1991, and was named American League Manager of the year in 1989. Robinson also managed the Cleveland Indians (1975-1977), the San Francisco Giants (1981-1984), and the Montreal Expos/Washington Nationals from 2002 through 2006.
Jeff Torborg who played for the Dodgers for six seasons (1964-1970) as a catcher, was named American League Manager of the Year in 1990, while skippering the Chicago White Sox. Torborg managed the White Sox from 1989 through 1991. Additional manager assignments included three seasons with the Cleveland Indians (1977-1979, two seasons with the New York Mets (1992-1993) a season with the Montreal Expos (2001) and two seasons with the Florida Marlins (2003 & 2003).
10. Working as a baseball scout, a coach, a manager, and a front office executive, Tommy Lasorda was one of two people to have spent 50 years in the Los Angeles Dodgers' organization. What was the job title of the other person?

Answer: Play by play announcer

Without question, the most recognizable voice in Los Angeles sports radio and television was that of play-by-play Dodgers announcer Vin Scully.
Vin Scully called Dodgers games for the first 50 years of the Los Angeles Dodgers franchise.

Scully began his career with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1950, working along side of veteran announcers Red Barber and Connie Desmond. Scully has commented on
numerous occasion to his radio audience about his initial job interview to become a Dodgers announcer. At age 22, he as a nervous kid being interviewed for the job by legendary Dodger minority owner Branch Rickey.

With the start of the 2013 Dodger baseball season, Scully started his 64th season with the Dodger organization. Only Tommy Lasorda has a longer tenure with the organization, having started his career as a player in 1949.
Scully's tenure with the Dodgers is the longest of any broadcaster with a single professional sports team.

Scully, known for his soothing melodious voice is known for his ability to "paint a mental picture" for his listeners of the action in the game, greatly increasing their overall understanding and enjoyment of the game.
Scully is also known for his great knowledge of the game, the players, the statistics, and interesting information about each player, which he shares with his listeners.

Unlike many baseball broadcasting teams where the play-by-play descriptions are augmented by comments from a second announcer or "color commentator", Scully will usually broadcast as a solo announcer. The usual practice was for Scully to call the first three innings of a game, have his partner broadcast the next three innings, then return behind the microphone to call the last three innings of the game. When Dodger games were televised, Scully would frequently simucast the ninth inning for both radio and television. This allowed the second broadcaster time to get to the field or dugouts to conduct post game interviews with players.

During the 1980s and 1990s, Scully would usually call all but the third and seventh innings of a games, resting and giving his co-announcer the opportunity to call two innings.

In addition to his duties in the Dodger Stadium press box, Scully worked for the CBS television network from 1975-1982, providing play-by-play coverage of NFL (National Football League) televised games and PGA (Professional Golfers' Association) tournaments and events.

Scully also worked for the NBC Television Network from 1983 through 1989, announcing the "Major League's Baseball Game of the Week" television broadcast. Scully also covered for NBC Sports, three World Series and four All-Star Games.

Throughout his career, Vin Scully has been the recipient of numerous awards. He has stated that the one award that has meant so much to him came in 1976, when fans voted him the "Most Memorable Personality in the History of the Dodgers Organization".

In 1995, Scully was honored with the Ford Frick Award from the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. A small sample of awards bestowed upon Scully includes The National Sportscaster and Sportswriters presentation of the "National Sportscaster of the Year", which Scully won in 1965, 1978, and 1982. Scully has won the "California Sportscaster of the Year" award on 29 occasions, and has been inducted into their Hall of Fame. Scully has also received a "Lifetime Achievement Emmy Award for Sportscasting" and was inducted into the National Radio Hall of Fame in 1995. In the Radio Category, Vin Scully received a star on the famed "Hollywood Walk of Fame" in 1982. Scully's star on the walk of fame sits in front of 6683 Hollywood Blvd.

In homage to Vin Scully, writer, producer, and creator of the television and movie series "The X-Files", Chris Carter, named one of his lead characters (FBI Special Agent Dana Scully) for him. In a similar homage, during the final season of "The X-Files" television season, lead character FBI Agent Fox Mulder was replaced by Agent John Doggett. Dodgers announcer Jerry Doggett worked along side of Vin Scully from 1956 until 1987 as the second Dodgers' announcer. Vin Scully and Jerry Doggett were the classic and best remembered Dodgers baseball broadcast team.
Source: Author MaceoMack

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor stuthehistoryguy before going online.
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