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1. Guy Fawkes, Sir Walter Raleigh, Alfred Dreyfus, John Brown, and Philippe Pétain were all convicted at one time or another of what high crime?


answer Answer: Treason

Interesting Information:
Some other well-known individuals that were convicted of treason include Louis XVI, Adolf Hitler, and Thomas Paine. Difficulty: Very Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Murder, Public Indecency, Blasphemy

2. What were an estimated 8,000 deaths in the Vietnam War and also the deaths of Pat Tillman and Stonewall Jackson attributed to?


answer Answer: Friendly Fire

Interesting Information:
Friendly fire is when an ally or one of your own military accidentally hits another ally or fellow-countryman in combat. Friendly fire is also called non-hostile fire, fratricide and 'blue on blue'. Difficulty: Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Agent Orange, Proximity Mines, Lead Poisoning

3. What aspiring actor unfortunately agreed to drop off a pair of eyeglasses to a condo located at 875 South Bundy Drive, Los Angeles, on June 12, 1994?


answer Answer: Ronald Goldman

Interesting Information:
The other answer choices are actually the names of three mass murderers. Ronald Goldman was murdered the same night as Nicole Brown Simpson. Although he was widely believed as the perpetrator, O. J. Simpson was found not guilty of both murders in October 1995. Difficulty: Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Edmund Kemper, John Justin Bunting, Dennis Nilsen

4. What future Soviet dictator was training to be a priest when he got turned on to Marxism?


answer Answer: Joseph Stalin

Interesting Information:
Stalin was born on 18 December 1878 in Gori, Georgia. At sixteen, he received a scholarship to a Georgian Orthodox seminary, where he wrote poetry and rebelled against being forced to speak Russian. Though he performed well, he was expelled shortly before his final exams because he was unable to pay his tuition fees. Difficulty: Average.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Karl Marx, Leonid Brezhnev, Nikita Khrushchev

5. Whose last words, "Sophie dear, don't die! Stay alive for our children!", were spoken after being shot in a car traveling on Franz Joseph street?


answer Answer: Franz Ferdinand

Interesting Information:
Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie were assassinated on June 28, 1914 in Sarajevo. Ferdinand's assassination prompted Austria-Hungary to declare war on Serbia. The allies of these respective nations declared war on their enemies as well, thus beginning World War I. Difficulty: Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Wilhelm II, Georges Clemenceau, John F. Kennedy

6. The Wars of the Roses were fought to control which country's throne?


answer Answer: England

Interesting Information:
These periodic wars, between the Houses of Lancaster and York, were fought between 1455 and 1485, though some historians extend the period to 1487. Difficulty: Very Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Scotland, Russia, Ireland

7. What is the fiery name given to the famous Civil War General Sherman's military tactics?


answer Answer: Scorched earth

Interesting Information:
In the American CIvil War, in 1864, General Sherman used this tactic in his "March to the Sea." He went from Atlanta to the coast where he conquered Savannah on December 21. Difficulty: Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Vertical envelopment, Massed howitzer fire, Pride's purge

8. By which name was the American World War 2 Medium tank 'M4' better known?


answer Answer: Sherman

Interesting Information:
Over 50,000 Shermans were produced, some heavily modified to suit different tasks such as mine clearing, tank recovery and self-propelled artillery. Some were even converted to be amphibious with the use of a waterproof canvas floatation screen and two propellers.

The tank was named after the Union General William Tecumseh Sherman. Difficulty: Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Pershing, Grant, Tiger

9. What is the name given to the spot in Massachusetts where the Pilgrims are said to have landed?


answer Answer: Plymouth Rock

Interesting Information:
Plymouth Rock still exists, with a carved "1620" on it. Nearby is Plymouth Plantation, the authentically reconstructed village of Plymouth, complete with costumed guides who give visitors a history of the area. Difficulty: Very Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
New Jersey, Boston, Nantucket Island

10. The Camp David Peace Accords, signed by Anwar El Sadat and Menachem Begin in 1978, led to a peace treaty between which two nations in 1979?


answer Answer: Israel and Egypt

Interesting Information:
Begin and Sadat signed the two agreements after twelve days of negotiations chaired by then US President, Jimmy Carter. Their efforts were rewarded not only with peace between the two nations, formalised in a treaty a year later, but also by the award of the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1978 to both leaders. Difficulty: Very Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
USA and Israel, Iran and Iraq, Russia and Afghanistan

11. Launched in 1973, what was the first space station owned and operated by NASA?


answer Answer: Skylab

Interesting Information:
Skylab orbited Earth from May 14, 1973, to July 11, 1979. Of that time, it was occupied for a total of 171 days by three separate three-man crews. Difficulty: Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Salyut, Mir, International Space Station

12. What important role did Bletchley Park play in WWII?


answer Answer: main British code-breaking station

Interesting Information:
The Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS) moved into the Bletchley Park estate on 15 August 1939, and by 1943 it housed the Colossus code-breaking machine, arguably the world's first programmable, digital, electronic, computing device. This was used to crack the codes produced by the German Enigma and Lorenz machines, and is believed by many to have shortened the war. Bletchley Park is now a museum. Difficulty: Average.
 
Some incorrect choices:
RAF fighter base, major radar station, secret Allied weapons development station

13. What grand-nephew of Julius Caesar was the first emperor of Rome?


answer Answer: Augustus

Interesting Information:
Although most people believe that Augustus was Julius Caesar's son, he was actually his grand nephew that was adopted in the will of Julius Caesar, in other words, after Caesar died. Difficulty: Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Mark Antony, Pompey, Ajax the Lesser

14. The US and Russia have deployed their own manned spacecraft for decades. In 2003, what nation was the third to have their own manned spaceflight?


answer Answer: China

Interesting Information:
China launched the Shenzhou 5 on October 15, 2003. The pilot was Yang Liwei. Difficulty: Hard.
 
Some incorrect choices:
India, Great Britain, Japan

15. Where was the document signed which begins "When in the course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve ..."?


answer Answer: Philadelphia

Interesting Information:
The document was, of course, the U.S. Declaration of Independence. It seems that it was signed in the Pennsylvania State House. It had fifty-six signatures by August 1776. Thomas Jefferson was selected to compose it. Like any good writer, he had at least one complete rough draft. Difficulty: Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Boston, New York City, Richmond

16. What is the name given to the collection of ancient Egyptian texts that are concerned with the journey to the 'afterlife'?


answer Answer: The Book of the Dead

Interesting Information:
"The Book of the Dead" is a collection of ancient writings that described the Egyptian concept of death and the afterlife. It contained prayers, magic spells and instructions concerning the safe transition through death to the afterlife. It was customary to bury mummies with copies of the text, or parts of it. Difficulty: Hard.
 
Some incorrect choices:
The Dead Sea Scrolls, The Papyrus of Osiris, The Hieroglyphs

17. In which European city was Checkpoint Charlie?


answer Answer: Berlin

Interesting Information:
Checkpoint Charlie was the name given to a crossing point between East and West Berlin during the Cold War. The name was given by the Western Allies. It is now the Checkpoint Charlie Museum. Difficulty: Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Amsterdam, Oslo, Munich

18. Who was the first Briton to walk in space?


answer Answer: Michael Foale

Interesting Information:
Michael Foale was born in 1952 in England to an English father and an American mother and was educated in Canterbury. He is the first Briton to walk in space and has stayed in Mir and the International Space Station. Difficulty: Very Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, Yuri Gagarin

19. In which Swiss city did the League of Nations have its headquarters?


answer Answer: Geneva

Interesting Information:
The League of Nations was created in 1919 thanks to an international wish for lasting peace. Although there were 42 founding members of the League who met annually in the Geneva headquarters, the USA was never a member thus crucially undermining the League. Moreover, Germany was not admitted to the League till 1926 and Hitler pulled the country out again in 1933. Difficulty: Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Bern, Basel, Zürich

20. What was discovered by an Arabic shepherd boy nicknamed 'Muhammad the Wolf' in caves near Qumran in the winter of 1946-47?


answer Answer: The Dead Sea Scrolls

Interesting Information:
The boy's real name was Muhammad Ahmed al-Hamed, but his nickname was Muhammad edh-Dhib (Muhammad the Wolf) and the caves were discovered by his cousin Jum'a Muhammad. Muhammad the Wolf later fell into one of the caves and discovered the first of the scrolls. For a fascinating book about the controversy they engendered, try 'The Dead Sea Scrolls Deception'.
Difficulty: Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
The Rosetta Stone, Oil, Ancient paintings

21. He was a general during the Civil War. What is the name of the 18th US president?


answer Answer: Ulysses Grant

Interesting Information:
Grant served two terms. He had four children, and one of them named after himself: Ulysses S. Grant Jr. Difficulty: Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt

22. In December of 2003, the US Army's 4th Infantry Division is often credited with playing the dominant role in the capture of what infamous person?


answer Answer: Saddam Hussein

Interesting Information:
Saddam Hussein, the ousted leader of Iraq, was found hiding in a spider hole outside his hometown of Tikrit on 13 December, 2003. Elements of the 4th Infantry Division, with US Air Force air cover and troops from a special operations task force participated in the raid of Objectives Wolverine I, II, and III in Operation Red Dawn. He was later tried by an Iraqi court, found guilty of multiple charges, and executed in 2006. Difficulty: Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Benito Mussolini, Abu Musab al Zarqawi, Theodore Kaczynski

23. On May 18th, 1980, what event followed this frantic radio warning: "Vancouver, Vancouver, this is it!"?


answer Answer: Eruption of Mount St. Helens

Interesting Information:
Those were the last words of U.S. volcanologist, 30 year old David Johnston, working with the U.S. Geological Survey team on the mountain, before he and 56 others were killed in the catastrophic eruption of Mount St. Helens. If it had not been for the work of David and the team monitoring the mountain, the death toll would have been very much higher. Difficulty: Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Earthquake, Aircraft disaster, Oil spill

24. After the 1972 Munich Massacre, Israel launched a covert operation to assassinate those involved with the massacre. What was this operation called?


answer Answer: Operation Wrath of God

Interesting Information:
Their targets were all members of the Palestinian extremist group Black September. This operation also gave rise to a sub-operation, Operation Spring of Youth, in which Mossad agents went to Lebanon to assassinate several prominent members of the Palestinian Liberation Organization. The film "Munich", directed by Steven Spielberg, was based on these events. Difficulty: Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Operation Magic Carpet, Operation Defensive Shield, Operation Determined Path

25. Which man orbited the moon whilst his two 'co-astronauts' completed the first moonwalk?


answer Answer: Michael Collins

Interesting Information:
Michael Collins was born in Italy in 1930. Apollo 11 was his second space flight when he piloted the command module. His first space flight was with the Gemini 10 mission in 1966.
Frank Borman orbited the moon in the Apollo 8 mission; Tom Stafford and John Young orbited in the Apollo 10 although John Young actually got to land on the moon as a part of the Apollo 16 mission. Difficulty: Average.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Frank Borman, Tom Stafford, John Young

26. What, in 1885, was shipped to the United States in 350 separate pieces, and was only put together once it reached its destination?


answer Answer: Statue of Liberty

Interesting Information:
The statue, officially titled "Liberty Enlightening the World", is one of the most famous symbols of the United States of America. A gift from France, it was disassembled into 350 pieces which were put into 214 crates and sent to New York on the frigate "Isère" in 1885. It was formally dedicated by President Grover Cleveland on October 28, 1886. Difficulty: Very Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Liberty Bell, White House, U.S.S. Midway

27. What was the first living mammal that humans put into orbit?


answer Answer: A dog named Laika

Interesting Information:
Laika travelled into orbit aboard Sputnik 2 on November 3, 1957. She proved that living mammals could survive being launched into orbit and being weightless. Thus, she paved the way for human spaceflight. Sadly, little Laika (her name means "Barker") did not survive the mission, and died in orbit, due to a suspected malfunction in her thermal control system. Difficulty: Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
A monkey named Bobo, A cat named Smudge, A guinea pig named Ivan

28. Who signed the Pact of Steel with Adolf Hitler?


answer Answer: Benito Mussolini

Interesting Information:
In short, the alliance between Germany and Italy. Signed by Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini on May 22, 1939, it formalized the 1936 Rome-Berlin Axis agreement, linking the two countries politically and militarily.


Difficulty: Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Miklos Horthy, Hirohito, Rashid Ali al Gailani

29. What wars were fought in Europe between the years of 1799 and 1815?


answer Answer: Napoleonic Wars

Interesting Information:
The Napoleonic Wars embroiled nearly all of Europe at one time or another between 1799 and 1815 in a bloody war. Several coalitions fought against him and ultimately triumphed at the Battle of Waterloo in June of 1815. Difficulty: Average.
 
Some incorrect choices:
The Sixteen Years' War, Revolutionary War, World War 1

30. In which year did the Berlin Wall fall?


answer Answer: 1989

Interesting Information:
The Berlin Wall was constructed in 1961 to prevent people from escaping to the West via West Berlin. It is estimated that over 100 people died while trying to cross the Wall. When border restrictions were loosened by the East German government in November 1989, citizens of both sides of Berlin started dismantling the wall. Difficulty: Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
1961, 2001, 1949

31. Which U.S. state formed when it seceded from a Confederate state in 1861, as a result of the Civil War?


answer Answer: West Virginia

Interesting Information:
The state of West Virginia formed after the state of Virginia seceeded and became a part of the confederacy. The state was finally admitted to the United States in 1863, after all the legalities were taken care of. Difficulty: Hard.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Texas, Oregon, Arizona

32. What is the name of the hurricane that devastated New Orleans and southern Mississippi in August 29, 2005?


answer Answer: Katrina

Interesting Information:
Hurricane Katrina crossed the southern Florida peninsula as a weak category 1 hurricane and then slowly developed into a category 5 hurricane while surging in the Gulf of Mexico. It then slammed into the Louisiana-Mississippi coast with 150-mile-an-hour winds, killing over 1800 people and creating more than 80 billion dollars in damage. Difficulty: Very Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Rita, Camille, Hugo

33. An infamous earthquake in 1906 struck which American city, located along the San Andreas fault?


answer Answer: San Francisco

Interesting Information:
The 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck two miles offshore from San Fransisco on April 18, 1906, but shaking was felt all the way in Oregon, Los Angeles, and Nevada. It was one of the worst natural disasters in US history, with the earthquake and its resultant fires claiming an estimated 3,000 lives. Difficulty: Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
New York City, Chicago, San Diego

34. It is well known that pirates in the Caribbean hunted for coins called pieces of eight, but which country minted these coins?


answer Answer: Spain

Interesting Information:
The piece of eight was a silver coin, so called because it was worth eight reales. It was first minted in 1497 and was legal currency in many countries beyond Spain and its possessions. Indeed, it wasn't until 1857 that it ceased to be accepted in the US. Difficulty: Easy.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Italy, Canada, France

35. The former colony of the Dutch East Indies is nowadays known as which country?


answer Answer: Indonesia

Interesting Information:
The first Dutch possessions in what is now Indonesia were acquired around 1600, but only in the 19th century were they turned into a single, large colony. As for the other countries mentioned, Vietnam was colonized by France, Sri Lanka by the United Kingdom (having previously been, at least in part, under Portuguese and then Dutch rule) and Thailand has never been a colony at all. Difficulty: Hard.
 
Some incorrect choices:
Thailand, Vietnam, Sri Lanka
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