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Quiz about Rebels with a Cause
Quiz about Rebels with a Cause

Rebels with a Cause Trivia Quiz


For every well-known authority figure in American history there is probably an equally well-known individual of the counter-culture. These subversives, though often vilified in their day, have helped keep the establishment in check...read on!

A multiple-choice quiz by thejazzkickazz. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
133,203
Updated
Jul 23 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
1126
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. The first rebellious figure of any note in American history was active well before the United States became a sovereign nation. Nathaniel Bacon, Jr. led a short-lived rebellion against the governor of the Virginia colony in 1676 that led to the deaths of several hundred and the sacking of Jamestown. Who was the governor of the Virginia colony and chief antagonist of Bacon? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Shays' Rebellion of 1787 was another very early example of discontent amongst the powerless masses in the United States. Led by a bankrupt farmer and former officer during the American Revolution named Daniel Shays, this uprising primarily occurred in which U.S. state? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. One of my favorite rebels, this former slave was a regular contributor to William Lloyd Garrison's abolitionist paper called 'The Liberator', and created his own regular paper called 'North Star' in 1847. Name this abolitionist hero whose most famous literary work happens to be his autobiography. Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Among this list of noted rebellious figures in 19th century American history, which person least fits? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. One of the most surprising examples of rebellion in American history occurred on October 16, 1859 when John Brown led a raid on the U.S. arsenal at Harpers Ferry, Virginia. Prior to the Harpers Ferry raid, Brown was well-known for his involvement in the violence that occurred earlier in the 1850s in which state? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, this elderly woman was an active supporter of labor rights, and was particularly involved in promoting the rights of mine workers. Born in Ireland as Mary Harris, she became known to the public as...? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. A "fin-de-siecle" organizer of labor, this man ran unsuccessfully for president under the Socialist Party ticket five times. What was the name of this American radical? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Perhaps the most storied and heroic act of rebellion in U.S. history occurred on December 1, 1955 when a middle-aged black woman refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white man. Of course, we are talking about Rosa Parks, one of the inspirational leaders of the black civil rights movement. In which city did Rosa Parks make her famous stand (or better yet, sit)? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Martin Luther King, Jr. was the paramount leader of the peaceful movement towards desegregation in the American south. For many years, his nemesis within the black civil rights movement was Malcolm X, whose advocacy for an end to government-supported discrimination did not necessarily include a peaceful agenda. Before becoming a militant Muslim, Malcolm had a different surname. What was his name at birth? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. The late 1960s was certainly an emotionally charged time in the arena of American politics. Already a period during which many of society's traditional mores and habits were being questioned, the debatable government policies associated with the war in Vietnam helped feed a groundswell of tempestuous discontentment. One of the spectacular events of this period occurred in Chicago in 1968, when protests rocked the Democratic Party convention being held in the windy city. A number of arrests were made, including those of the 'Chicago Eight', who were then tried under a storm of media attention. The 'Eight' eventually became 'Seven' when which member of this collection of rebels was given a four-year prison sentence for contempt of court? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The first rebellious figure of any note in American history was active well before the United States became a sovereign nation. Nathaniel Bacon, Jr. led a short-lived rebellion against the governor of the Virginia colony in 1676 that led to the deaths of several hundred and the sacking of Jamestown. Who was the governor of the Virginia colony and chief antagonist of Bacon?

Answer: William Berkeley

Though Bacon was a representative of the poorest planters along the outskirts of the poorly defined Virginia colony, he in fact was a member of a wealthy English family, and the cousin of Governor Berkeley. Bacon's rebellious nature (he was sent to Virginia in the first place by his father in the hopes that he would mend his tempestuous behavior) led to confrontation with Berkeley and the House of Burgesses on both Indian policy and on economic grounds.

This rather complicated situation, with planters in the frontier wanting increased protection from hostile Indians and better access to trade with allied native tribes, became stickier when Bacon entered Jamestown and sat as an elected member of the House of Burgesses.

After gaining pardon from Berkeley, Bacon angrily walked out of a house session when Indian relations were again debated. Bacon and his followers proceeded to burn Jamestown and forced Berkeley to flee.

The rebellion (or, as some might term it, power struggle) did not last long, however...Bacon succumbed to the 'bloodie flux and lousey disease' (sic) later that year at only 29 years of age.
2. Shays' Rebellion of 1787 was another very early example of discontent amongst the powerless masses in the United States. Led by a bankrupt farmer and former officer during the American Revolution named Daniel Shays, this uprising primarily occurred in which U.S. state?

Answer: Massachusetts

Shays' Rebellion was the first major stirring of the 'masses' in the history of the United States. Led by poor, and in many cases bankrupt, farmers, the aggrieved rebels fought against what they saw as the repressive authority of the Massachusetts state government, which had collected taxes and fees in a manner deemed unjust by many citizens (sounds a bit like the reasoning behind the American Revolution, doesn't it?) The rebellion was eventually quelled, but not before some concessions were offered to the insurgents. Shays escaped to Vermont, and was eventually pardoned.

It was his rebellion that prompted Hamilton and Madison to write the 'Federalist Papers', calling for a powerful central authority in the United States. Meanwhile, Thomas Jefferson, hearing of the brouhaha while serving as ambassador to France, suggested that 'a little rebellion now and then is a good thing.'
3. One of my favorite rebels, this former slave was a regular contributor to William Lloyd Garrison's abolitionist paper called 'The Liberator', and created his own regular paper called 'North Star' in 1847. Name this abolitionist hero whose most famous literary work happens to be his autobiography.

Answer: Frederick Douglass

Douglass was a stalwart in the anti-slavery drive during the mid-19th century, but his anti-authoritarian feelings did not stop at that one issue. For example, he was quite daringly outspoken against the Mexican-American War at a time when anti-war protest was isolated to a few, exceptional mainstream politicians (including a young Abraham Lincoln!) One famous and rather cynical line from Douglass, 'Find out just what any people will quietly submit to and you have found out the exact measure of injustice and wrong that will be imposed upon them.'
4. Among this list of noted rebellious figures in 19th century American history, which person least fits?

Answer: Harriet Tubman

Prosser, Vesey and Turner were all leaders of noted slave rebellions of the early 19th century, while Tubman was an escaped slave who helped release other slaves from their degraded position in bondage. The Prosser rebellion was thwarted before his plan, which called for an uprising of several thousand slaves against white slaveholders and the state government in Virginia, could be put into effect. Prosser, the 25 year old ringleader, escaped but was soon captured and put to death. Denmark Vesey's 1822 scheme, much like Prosser's, was found out and quashed before it could be put into effect.

The plan was to burn Charleston and instigate a general slave revolt within South Carolina. Vesey's plan was also discovered before coming to fruition, and he, along with 35 other blacks, was put to death. Unlike the previous two rebellions, the uprising led by Nat Turner in 1831 resulted in a great deal of violence and death.

However, like the previous two rebellions, the ringleader(s) were quickly captured and executed. Though these rebellions are the most prominent and well-documented, many other examples of slave rebellion occurred during the early 19th century, squashing the oft-promoted suggestion of the time that enslaved blacks were content with their existence in bondage.
5. One of the most surprising examples of rebellion in American history occurred on October 16, 1859 when John Brown led a raid on the U.S. arsenal at Harpers Ferry, Virginia. Prior to the Harpers Ferry raid, Brown was well-known for his involvement in the violence that occurred earlier in the 1850s in which state?

Answer: Kansas

Before Brown gained international notoriety for his foolishly daring attempt to instigate slave rebellion in Virginia, he was a participant in several acts of violence in what became known as 'bleeding Kansas'. Specifically, Brown was involved in the 'Pottawatomie Massacre', which occurred in May, 1856 and involved the killing of five men who advocated the rights of slaveholders. John Brown's actions in Kansas and Virginia made him a hero among militant abolitionists, and a villain amongst the slaveholding south. Though he has been portrayed in American history textbooks as a man of questionable sanity, his comments and responses during his trial and the period before his execution appear to have been those of a man with sound mind and ardent Christian beliefs.
6. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, this elderly woman was an active supporter of labor rights, and was particularly involved in promoting the rights of mine workers. Born in Ireland as Mary Harris, she became known to the public as...?

Answer: Mother Jones

Mother Jones, an Irish-born immigrant, was famous as a 'white-haired' spitfire, who trenchantly criticized the very wealthy and pointedly attacked the U.S. government's lack of labor laws. Involved with the socialist movement, she strongly advocated for the rights of children, who were forced to work in grueling conditions.

Interestingly, though she was born in 1837, she publicly announced her birthdate as May 1, 1830...unusually making herself older, rather than younger as public figures are normally wont to do.

This fabricated birth year helped her to appear more 'grandmotherly', and the choice of May 1st was in special homage to May Day, a socialist/labor holiday.
7. A "fin-de-siecle" organizer of labor, this man ran unsuccessfully for president under the Socialist Party ticket five times. What was the name of this American radical?

Answer: Eugene V. Debs

Eugene V. Debs is a fine example of a third-party candidate in U.S. history who, though unsuccessful at the polls, managed to influence mainstream politics. Advocating a socialist agenda which, like Mother Jones, attacked the lack of regulation in corporate America, Debs was able to help the American worker and the consumer make profitable gains in the areas of health, work hours, workers' safety, etc. Debs' fifth and final run for president was done so while he languished in jail as a result of his outspoken opposition to Woodrow Wilson's Espionage Act of 1917 and U.S. involvement in World War I.

The vindictive Wilson was so peeved at Debs' various acts of subversion that, following the 'Great War', he refused to pardon his long-time political adversary.

It took a presidential turnover to do the trick...Warren G. Harding had Debs pardoned and released in 1921.
8. Perhaps the most storied and heroic act of rebellion in U.S. history occurred on December 1, 1955 when a middle-aged black woman refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white man. Of course, we are talking about Rosa Parks, one of the inspirational leaders of the black civil rights movement. In which city did Rosa Parks make her famous stand (or better yet, sit)?

Answer: Montgomery, Alabama

Rosa Parks was born in Tuskegee, Alabama (also famous for Booker T. Washington's Tuskegee Institute and the World War II Tuskegee Airmen) as Rosa Louise McCauley. She married Raymond Parks, and together, they became members of the NAACP. Mrs. Parks' refusal to give up her seat on the bus in Montgomery was an unplanned event, but instigated a very well organized 382 day boycott of the publicly-owned bus company in that Alabama town.

This led to the desegregation of buses in Montgomery, and the birth of the NAACP's attack on the entire system of segregation in the American south.
9. Martin Luther King, Jr. was the paramount leader of the peaceful movement towards desegregation in the American south. For many years, his nemesis within the black civil rights movement was Malcolm X, whose advocacy for an end to government-supported discrimination did not necessarily include a peaceful agenda. Before becoming a militant Muslim, Malcolm had a different surname. What was his name at birth?

Answer: Little

While Martin Luther King, Jr. gained notoriety for his powerful and eloquent leadership in the south, Malcolm X took a different approach in the north. A member of the Nation of Islam, founded by Elijah Muhammad, Malcolm advocated an attack on discrimination against blacks in America 'by any means necessary.' Most experts would suggest that it was a combination of King's peaceful, mainstream movement, and the hostile and threatening underground swell promoted by Malcolm that helped led to the passing of civil rights laws and the overturn of the repugnant system of segregation. Later in his career, Malcolm broke from the Nation of Islam, causing a great rift between himself and the members of that organization. Speculation continues about who was behind his 1965 assassination death in New York City...
10. The late 1960s was certainly an emotionally charged time in the arena of American politics. Already a period during which many of society's traditional mores and habits were being questioned, the debatable government policies associated with the war in Vietnam helped feed a groundswell of tempestuous discontentment. One of the spectacular events of this period occurred in Chicago in 1968, when protests rocked the Democratic Party convention being held in the windy city. A number of arrests were made, including those of the 'Chicago Eight', who were then tried under a storm of media attention. The 'Eight' eventually became 'Seven' when which member of this collection of rebels was given a four-year prison sentence for contempt of court?

Answer: Bobby Seale

Bobby Seale, the only black member of the 'Eight', apparently stepped over the line by calling the judge a 'fascist pig' and a 'racist' in open court. The other defendants, aka the 'Chicago Seven' (Rennie Davis, David Dellinger, John Froines, Tom Hayden, Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, and Lee Wiener) were also all convicted, but their sentence was overturned by the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals.

It seems that the jury was deemed biased (several members of the jury had announced that they believed the defendents should be considered guilty simply because of their appearances and lifestyles) and the judge (another Hoffman) did not take proper care in making jury selections. Seale, a founding member of the Black Panther Party, spent four years in prison, during which time he was accused, but not convicted, of murdering a fellow prisoner. Later he renounced his advocacy of political violence, ran unsuccessfully for mayor of Oakland and wrote a cookbook on 'barbeque'n'.

This concludes my rebellious quiz...let's remember, the United States is a nation formed on rebellion...questioning authority is not a bad thing.

As John Bradshaw, who tried and sentenced King Charles II in England once said, 'Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God.' Thank you for playing!
Source: Author thejazzkickazz

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