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Quiz about Home
Quiz about Home

Home Trivia Quiz


Home is where the heart is, so if you want to find out which city I still call home (in spite of no longer living there), connect the nine clues, taken from nine different categories, in this quiz!

A multiple-choice quiz by WesleyCrusher. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
346,610
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
479
-
Question 1 of 10
1. Humanities: The primary fortress of a walled city, often incorporating a castle and serving as the last retreat of the population in the case of a siege, was called by which term? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Geography: Beginning in Switzerland (touching Austria some of the way), then running north through Germany (forming its border to France for a significant length), this river forms a delta in the Netherlands, eventually draining into the North Sea. Which river, second largest in Western Europe by discharge, is this? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Sports: From 2008 to 2014, the coach of German soccer club Borussia Dortmund (2012 German champion and cup winner, 2013 Champions League finalist) was which former long-term second German league player? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Television: The "Wetten dass..." evening show, basis of the UK "You Bet" and US "Wanna Bet" shows, has been invented and seen its over 30 year run on the main channel of the only nationwide public German television broadcaster. Which channel is this? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. History: In 12th century Germany, a small group of nobles formed an electoral college which would choose the king and Emperor whenever such was needed. Seven (later nine) men made up this council; which title did they bear due to this membership? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Religion: Which Latin term, originally applied to any seat of a bishop directly derived from the apostolic tradition, fell into disuse for this purpose and now only applies to two Roman Catholic dioceses (although most persons would believe there is only one)? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. World: This holiday, although not a public holiday in most of Germany, is considered the high point and near end of a festive season that is considered to begin on November 11. It can fall as early as February 2 or as late as March 8 depending on the Easter date. Which day of merriment is this? (I'm looking for the version of the name that's a direct translation of the German name.) Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Hobbies: In a significant part of Germany, the acronym "WWW" has been in use for something else than the World Wide Web for centuries, namely a traditional, simple working meal. Written out, the letters stand for "Weck, Worscht un Woi", standing for the three components making up this rather portable lunch. Which of the following is NOT part of it? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. People: In 1999, this son of my hometown was selected as the most influential person of the second millennium by A&E Network, and his work certainly has changed our lives. Before his work, the process of printing involved making a new, hand-cut or custom cast plate for every page. Who was this man who, in 1452, single-handedly revolutionized the sharing of information? (I am looking for the popularly known name) Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. If you connect the nine correct answers, they will all point to a single city whose coat of arms features two six-spoked wheels connected by a cross, all rendered in white on a red background. What is this city?

Answer: (One Word, name of city, five letters)

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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Humanities: The primary fortress of a walled city, often incorporating a castle and serving as the last retreat of the population in the case of a siege, was called by which term?

Answer: Citadel

Citadels, often shaped like stars or polygons, were once the primary defensive fortifications of the middle ages and renaissance in Europe. Most often, they were integrated into the city's outer wall because doing so allowed more space than putting them into the middle of the city, and also saved on construction costs as they could share half of the wall with the actual city wall.

In addition, this position allowed for the inhabitants of the citadel to directly leave both into and out of the city.

The star-shaped arrangement was frequently chosen because it offered the best defense against cannon fire.
2. Geography: Beginning in Switzerland (touching Austria some of the way), then running north through Germany (forming its border to France for a significant length), this river forms a delta in the Netherlands, eventually draining into the North Sea. Which river, second largest in Western Europe by discharge, is this?

Answer: Rhine

Measured by length in Germany alone, the Rhine is Germany's longest river. Lake Constance, marking the touching point of Germany, Switzerland and Austria, is actually a part of the Rhine which both feeds and drains it. From the Swiss-German border to the estuary, the Rhine is an important waterway, particularly for coal and oil.

It also plays an important part in German culture, with many sagas (including the "Nibelungenlied", basis for Richard Wagner's "Ring" cycle and the Loreley saga) surrounding it.
3. Sports: From 2008 to 2014, the coach of German soccer club Borussia Dortmund (2012 German champion and cup winner, 2013 Champions League finalist) was which former long-term second German league player?

Answer: Jürgen Klopp

In his career as an active player, Jürgen Klopp scored 52 goals in 325 games in the German second league. He was a versatile player who could play as both a defender and a striker. However, his career as a coach (since 2001) has been much more successful.

In his first five years with Dortmund, he twice won the German league title (2011 and 2012) and once the German cup (2012). In 2013, Dortmund narrowly lost the first ever all-German Champions League final 1-2 to Bayern Munich.
4. Television: The "Wetten dass..." evening show, basis of the UK "You Bet" and US "Wanna Bet" shows, has been invented and seen its over 30 year run on the main channel of the only nationwide public German television broadcaster. Which channel is this?

Answer: ZDF

Running from 1981 to 2014, the "Wetten, dass...?" show presented stars in a talk format with inserted "bets" - each star would sponsor a candidate who would attempt a difficult, often astonishing, live feat. The show's downfall began after a December 2010 accident in which Samuel Koch, a stuntman, attempted to jump over a driving car and was hit hard, resulting in complete quadriplegic paralysis.

In April 2014, it was announced that at the end of the year 2014, the show would end its 34-year run.
5. History: In 12th century Germany, a small group of nobles formed an electoral college which would choose the king and Emperor whenever such was needed. Seven (later nine) men made up this council; which title did they bear due to this membership?

Answer: Prince-electors

The medieval king of Germany was chosen and appointed by the prince-electors (German "Kurfürsten" from "küren", to appoint, and "Fürst", a general title for all members of the higher nobility), three archbishops and four mundane rulers. If confirmed by the pope, the king would then be crowned Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire which, in addition to Germany during some eras, included Bohemia, Burgundy and even Italy.
6. Religion: Which Latin term, originally applied to any seat of a bishop directly derived from the apostolic tradition, fell into disuse for this purpose and now only applies to two Roman Catholic dioceses (although most persons would believe there is only one)?

Answer: Sancta Sedes

"Sancta Sedes" (literally "Holy Seat", often translated as "Apostolic Seat") was the term for any diocese that could trace its origin directly to one of the apostles. The holders of these dioceses were considered the highest ranking bishops in the church, often also titles as patriarchs. Today, the common understanding of the term refers, of course, to the Papal seat as Bishop of Rome, however one German diocese still officially has the right to this title as well.
7. World: This holiday, although not a public holiday in most of Germany, is considered the high point and near end of a festive season that is considered to begin on November 11. It can fall as early as February 2 or as late as March 8 depending on the Easter date. Which day of merriment is this? (I'm looking for the version of the name that's a direct translation of the German name.)

Answer: Rose Monday

The most common name for this holiday in the English-speaking world is Shrove Monday, but the German name "Rosenmontag" directly translates to the less commonly used "Rose Monday". In Rhenish carnival (which traditionally starts November 11, 11:11 am), this is the peak day of celebration. All major carnival-celebrating cities have parades on this day similar in style to a US Thanksgiving or Fourth of July parade but with the floats satirically reflecting events or personalities of the previous year.

It is the last carnival day on which people celebrate into the morning; on Shrove Tuesday, all celebrations end at precisely midnight when the date rolls over to Ash Wednesday.
8. Hobbies: In a significant part of Germany, the acronym "WWW" has been in use for something else than the World Wide Web for centuries, namely a traditional, simple working meal. Written out, the letters stand for "Weck, Worscht un Woi", standing for the three components making up this rather portable lunch. Which of the following is NOT part of it?

Answer: Potato chips

The combination of "Weck, Worscht un Woi" - consisting of a strongly-flavored bread roll, Bologna sausage and local white wine - was the traditional lunch of many workers in the wine-producing areas of Germany. Its main advantage was that it was easily portable and could be eaten while walking or working. Apart from a corkscrew to open the wine bottle and possibly a knife to peel the sausage, it does not require any dishes or tools to eat nor does it necessitate any preparation.

It has fallen out of use as a workman's lunch due to the alcohol content of the wine, but it is still very much alive as a traditional carnival treat and for a Sunday morning brunch.
9. People: In 1999, this son of my hometown was selected as the most influential person of the second millennium by A&E Network, and his work certainly has changed our lives. Before his work, the process of printing involved making a new, hand-cut or custom cast plate for every page. Who was this man who, in 1452, single-handedly revolutionized the sharing of information? (I am looking for the popularly known name)

Answer: Johannes Gutenberg

Johannes Gensfleisch zu Laden, better known as Johannes Gutenberg (ca. 1397 to 1468), was the inventor of movable type printing. In this technique, pages were assembled from single letters cast in metal and assembled in frames so they could be printed and then taken apart again to reuse the letters (whose cutting or casting was by far the most difficult and time-consuming aspect of pre-Gutenberg printing). Movable type also vastly shortened the time required from the availability of a new text to be printed to its actual printing - shorter texts could be made ready in under an hour instead of the days, if not weeks, needed to make a custom plate.

The other three Johannes are also notable personalities from my hometown - Johannes Fust was a merchant contemporary of Gutenberg who financed Gutenberg's activities, Johannes Cochläus was a 16th century catholic cleric and fierce opponent of Martin Luther and Johannes Bückler was an infamous late 18th century robber popularly known as Schinderhannes.
10. If you connect the nine correct answers, they will all point to a single city whose coat of arms features two six-spoked wheels connected by a cross, all rendered in white on a red background. What is this city?

Answer: Mainz

Situated on the confluence of the Rhine (2) and Main rivers, Mainz is one of the three main bastions of Rhenish carnival (7), during which "Weck, Worscht un Woi" (8) are ubiquitous. It has been an important archdiocese which, to this day, bears the official title Sancta Sedes Moguntia (6) and whose archbishop was the chairman and most influential of the prince-electors (5). From the 15th century printing (9) innovation to being the headquarter of ZDF (4), Mainz has remained a pivotal location in mass communication. The Mainz citadel (1), regionally known as just "the citadel" is a baroque fortress that has been of strategic importance through World War I; today it is the site of the city's historic museum. The Mainz soccer club 1. FSV Mainz 05 is the club Jürgen Klopp (3) played all his second league games for and which he subsequently coached during their ascent to the Bundesliga (top German playing class) in 2004.

The Wheel of Mainz, which shows up twice in the coat of arms, is the symbol of St. Martin of Tours who is the city patron of Mainz and also, with its six spokes, resembles the Christ monogram in a circle. The connecting cross reinforces the religious symbolism.
Source: Author WesleyCrusher

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