Quiz about More Random Articles From Wikipedia
Quiz about More Random Articles From Wikipedia

More Random Articles From Wikipedia Quiz


Determined to find even more esoteric articles on Wikipedia through the "random article" search option, I continued my search and found some very interesting information.

A multiple-choice quiz by adams627. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Author
adams627
Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
331,806
Updated
Feb 23 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
1680
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: Guest 24 (7/10), Guest 67 (7/10), Guest 172 (6/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. The first article I came across detailed the life history of American colonist Samuel Prescott. Prescott perhaps epitomizes the emblem of "forgotten hero," after his exploits in April 1775 earn him only a footnote in most American history textbooks. Yet he managed to surpass the achievements of a certain silversmith, and deserves credit for warning Concord about an imminent battle. What American patriot usually receives the credit for Samuel Prescott's achievements? Hint

Paul Revere
John Hancock
Samuel Adams
Benedict Arnold

2. First put into place in 1896, this transportation system is part of the VBB tariff and consists of six major routes. Using it, tourists can travel from Muggelbergallee to Wassersportallee in just two minutes (It would take me longer just to pronounce those two words)! The Rivers Spree, Dahme, and Havel necessitate the transportation specifics found in which very obscure Wikipedia article about a European capital? Hint

Metro transport in Prague
Ferry transport in Berlin
Train transport in Amsterdam
Bus transport in Paris

3. Unless you are a fan of Belizean game shows, you (like me) probably have never heard of the show "Tek It or Leave It," but even if you haven't, the concept is pretty simple. Actually, it's very similar to another game show, during which contestants choose a briefcase at the start of the game, then spend an hour waffling over which other briefcase holds a penny. After what successful show, shown in several different variants around the world, is the Belizean idea modeled? Hint

Jeopardy!
Deal or No Deal
Wheel of Fortune
Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?

4. Another Wikipedia article might have pointed me toward a good, semi-obscure holiday present for friends that love puzzles. Here's the puzzle: you have a four-sided tetrahedron, each side painted in a different color. The goal is to mix up the ten game pieces so that the colors are scrambled, then twist them around so that you get back to the original starting position. Sound familiar? It probably is. Who invented this namesake "triamid?" Hint

Douglas Hofstadter
Frank Fox
Erno Rubik
Larry Nichols

5. When I happened across a random article about the Boyd Massacre, I almost reflexively clicked for the next page, before seeing the word "cannibalism" and being enticed to read further. Before now, I'd never heard of the event, but I realized later that the event, during which 66 people were killed and eaten, would have some historical influence on at least one particular country. Which country's history would be changed by that incident of Maori cannibalism? Hint

Bolivia
Cameroon
New Zealand
Kazakhstan

6. The next random article I come across is about Cathedral Square, which is probably more famous for the buildings that overlook it than the square itself. The Cathedrals of the Dormition, Archangel, and Annunciation sit upon the square, which also contains the Ivan the Great Belltower. That tower is the highest structure in the Kremlin. In which European city could you find Cathedral Square? Hint

Prague
Paris
Moscow
Vienna

7. Unless you're a South American ichthyologist, you probably aren't familiar with Pimelodus pictus, one of those obscure species poking around Wikipedia. The species is also known as the pictus cat, has a venomous sting, and will eat pretty much anything. Which of the following best describes the animal found in that classification? Hint

Catfish native to the Amazon river
Dragonfly found in the Patagonian region
Endangered jaguar of the Amazon jungle
Marine iguana studied on the Galapagos islands

8. The 1893 short story collection "£1,000,000 Bank Note and Other New Stories" was written by one of my favorite authors, but I'd never heard of that story before I came to a Wikipedia article devoted to the collection. More famous short works by that author include "The Man that Corrupted Hadleyburg," "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County," and "Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses". What great American literary mind and humorist was the author? Hint

Mark Twain
Bret Harte
Ambrose Bierce
John Steinbeck

9. Culturally and historically, some religions have greater impacts on certain regions than others. Only Wikipedia could possibly have an article detailing the effects of one world religion on an area that has hardly been influenced by it at all. Although the Horn is mentioned in the Ramayana, only cities like Lagos and Accra have substantial followers of that ancient faith, more associated with Bangalore. What religion and continent were paired in a surprising article? Hint

Zoroastrianism in Europe
Judaism in South America
Hinduism in Africa
Buddhism in Australia

10. In Montreal, Romanian Vasile DÓba became the champion with a time of one minute, forty-six seconds, barely outpacing Zoltan Sztanity. In that year, the K-1 event made its debut as a 500 meter sprint. In contrast, in 2012 in London, both sprint and slalom events will take place, at Eton Dorney and the Lee Valley White Water Centre respectively.

The final article I found on Wikipedia might be the most arcane of them all. What was the title?
Hint

Skiing at the 1982 Winter Olympics
Underwater Basket Weaving at the 1934 Winter Olympics
Track at the 1996 Summer Olympics
Kayaking at the 1976 Summer Olympics


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The first article I came across detailed the life history of American colonist Samuel Prescott. Prescott perhaps epitomizes the emblem of "forgotten hero," after his exploits in April 1775 earn him only a footnote in most American history textbooks. Yet he managed to surpass the achievements of a certain silversmith, and deserves credit for warning Concord about an imminent battle. What American patriot usually receives the credit for Samuel Prescott's achievements?

Answer: Paul Revere

Samuel Prescott was born on August 19, 1751, to an important Boston family, and he spent his early life training to be a doctor. However, when revolutionary sentiments began to arise, especially in Massachusetts, Prescott became a strong supporter of the Sons of Liberty and Committees of Correspondence that united the colonists against the British.

On April 18, 1775, Prescott left the Massachusetts city of Lexington late at night, when he happened across two other colonists: Paul Revere and William Dawes. Revere and Dawes had been sent to Concord (where there was a munitions stockhold) to warn that the British troops were on the march and likely would attack in the morning. Prescott joined the group, which was quickly apprehended by a group of British scouts. Prescott and Dawes escaped, barely, but Revere was captured. The two "forgotten" patriots then got the message to Concord, allowing a small force to be mustered when, the next day, the first shots of the American Revolution were fired. Revere was later immortalized in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's famous poem, "Paul Revere's Ride".
2. First put into place in 1896, this transportation system is part of the VBB tariff and consists of six major routes. Using it, tourists can travel from Muggelbergallee to Wassersportallee in just two minutes (It would take me longer just to pronounce those two words)! The Rivers Spree, Dahme, and Havel necessitate the transportation specifics found in which very obscure Wikipedia article about a European capital?

Answer: Ferry transport in Berlin

Ferry transport in Berlin is not a very fascinating subject- suffice it to say that there are six ferry routes inside city limits funded by the VBB. The VBB (Verkehrsverbund Berlin-Brandenburg) is a private German company that provides public transport mainly for the areas of Berlin and Brandenburg; all told, it is one of the largest transport associations in the world. In addition to the six ferry lines served inside the city of Berlin, the VBB also supports another ferry line in the nearby city of Potsdam.

Interestingly, Berlin has one of the best well-run public transport associations in the world, and accordingly, has fewer cars per capita than most major European cities. The River Spree passes through Berlin, providing water transport as well as entertainment. One interesting landmark on the Spree is the Badeschiff, a public swimming pool actually located on top of, but separated from, the river itself. Although the Spree is heavily polluted and not safe for free swimming, Berliners can go swimming in a pool inside a river.
3. Unless you are a fan of Belizean game shows, you (like me) probably have never heard of the show "Tek It or Leave It," but even if you haven't, the concept is pretty simple. Actually, it's very similar to another game show, during which contestants choose a briefcase at the start of the game, then spend an hour waffling over which other briefcase holds a penny. After what successful show, shown in several different variants around the world, is the Belizean idea modeled?

Answer: Deal or No Deal

"Deal or No Deal" was the brainchild of Dutchman John de Mol in 2000, but was quickly exported to the rest of the world by the producer Endemol. The original Dutch version, called "Miljoenenjacht", was actually a quiz show, but in 2002 the format changed to an idea more familiar to modern viewers. A contestant chooses one briefcase from a group of 26, each holding a different money value, from small change up to millions. That case becomes the player's personal briefcase. Then, the contestant chooses cases at random from the other 25, revealing dollar values that therefore could not be present in the player's case. At various junctures, a banker offers the player a sum of money to quit the game and take, usually a low estimate of the average amount still left in play.

Unfortunately, the Wikipedia article on "Tek It or Leave It" was incomplete regarding any specific format changes for that particular game version. If there are any Belizean game show fans who could enlighten me, I'm interested to know!
4. Another Wikipedia article might have pointed me toward a good, semi-obscure holiday present for friends that love puzzles. Here's the puzzle: you have a four-sided tetrahedron, each side painted in a different color. The goal is to mix up the ten game pieces so that the colors are scrambled, then twist them around so that you get back to the original starting position. Sound familiar? It probably is. Who invented this namesake "triamid?"

Answer: Erno Rubik

Erno Rubik was born in Hungary in the middle of World War II, where he grew up and studied architecture. In 1974, he invented the now world-famous Rubik's Cube, a three-dimensional puzzle in which a three-by-three-by-three cube, painted in six different colors, must be scrambled to get all visible colors present on the same side, just by rotating a row or column in three dimensions. Rubik's other inventions have a similar concept, although none have been as successful as the Cube, the world's top-selling puzzle game through 2009.

The puzzle is notoriously difficult to solve without a special algorithm to get the game pieces to line up properly. Speed-solving competitions for the Rubik's Cube are also popular: in 2010, Feliks Zemdegs solved the puzzle in less than seven seconds.
5. When I happened across a random article about the Boyd Massacre, I almost reflexively clicked for the next page, before seeing the word "cannibalism" and being enticed to read further. Before now, I'd never heard of the event, but I realized later that the event, during which 66 people were killed and eaten, would have some historical influence on at least one particular country. Which country's history would be changed by that incident of Maori cannibalism?

Answer: New Zealand

In 1809, a convict ship named "The Boyd" was sailed from Sydney Cove, Australia, to the northern New Zealand port of Whangaroa, under the charge of Captain John Thompson. Aboard the ship was the son of a Maori chief named George. While on the ship, George was whipped due to an unknown circumstance that was alternately blamed and not blamed on him. When George returned to his Maori tribe, they vowed revenge.

The Maori then lured Thompson's crew away from the ship, into the forest. Using axes, they killed the foreigners and stole their clothes. Then, they snuck aboard the Boyd at night dressed like the now-consumed men, and killed the rest of the Boyd's crewmen. Only five lives were spared. The long-term effect was a diminishing of trade with New Zealand and the determent of missionaries to the islands until a few years later.
6. The next random article I come across is about Cathedral Square, which is probably more famous for the buildings that overlook it than the square itself. The Cathedrals of the Dormition, Archangel, and Annunciation sit upon the square, which also contains the Ivan the Great Belltower. That tower is the highest structure in the Kremlin. In which European city could you find Cathedral Square?

Answer: Moscow

The Kremlin is a complex is the center of Russia's capital, Moscow, and is the home of Russia's president. Cathedral Square is a significant locale in the area, as the site of the funerals and inauguration of Russian leaders since tsardom, and up to Dmitry Medvedev. The Kremlin's more famous landmarks include the Red Square and the amazing architecture of Saint Basil's Cathedral.

The first citadel in Moscow was constructed in the fourteenth century, during the age of the Kievan Rus, and maintained its importance for the civilization for centuries. When Peter the Great moved his residence to St. Petersburg, the Moscow Kremlin lost some significance until Catherine the Great resurrected the city during her reign. When Napoleon's troops invaded Russia, they burnt the Kremlin severely, but it was restored soon after. During the twentieth century, the Soviet Union led from the Kremlin. The citadel would be made a World Heritage Site almost immediately after the Cold War ended.
7. Unless you're a South American ichthyologist, you probably aren't familiar with Pimelodus pictus, one of those obscure species poking around Wikipedia. The species is also known as the pictus cat, has a venomous sting, and will eat pretty much anything. Which of the following best describes the animal found in that classification?

Answer: Catfish native to the Amazon river

The pictus cat is no ordinary catfish. The fish's barbels (the whisker-like appendages present on most catfish) are long enough to reach all the way back to its caudal (hind) fin. Because pictus cats are colored silver with black spots, they may be desired for aquarium trade.

However, their fins are covered with actual spines, which can actually break plastic bags and prevent easy shipping. Like many catfish, Pimelodus pictus is a bottom-feeding omnivore, but it will eat other small fish when insects or fruit are not available.

The spines on its caudal fin can puncture the skin and are imbued with a weak venom that can be extremely unpleasant for some Amazonian predators.
8. The 1893 short story collection "£1,000,000 Bank Note and Other New Stories" was written by one of my favorite authors, but I'd never heard of that story before I came to a Wikipedia article devoted to the collection. More famous short works by that author include "The Man that Corrupted Hadleyburg," "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County," and "Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses". What great American literary mind and humorist was the author?

Answer: Mark Twain

Mark Twain (aka Samuel Langhorne Clemens, the name he was born into on November 30, 1835, in Florida, Missouri) was undoubtedly one of the most influential writers in United States history, founding literary genres like regionalism and realism. Twain's most famous works are probably his novels: "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer," "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court," and several others set around the Mississippi River. Twain's birth coincided with the appearance of Halley's Comet in 1835, and he predicted in 1909 that his death would be linked with the comet's return. The humorist wasn't joking, here. When he died in 1910, it was one day after the comet had made its closest pass toward the Earth.

Although his novels are poignant and comical, Twain's short stories are often his funniest work. "Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses" had me in hysterics the first time I read it.
9. Culturally and historically, some religions have greater impacts on certain regions than others. Only Wikipedia could possibly have an article detailing the effects of one world religion on an area that has hardly been influenced by it at all. Although the Horn is mentioned in the Ramayana, only cities like Lagos and Accra have substantial followers of that ancient faith, more associated with Bangalore. What religion and continent were paired in a surprising article?

Answer: Hinduism in Africa

African history shows most plainly the influence of introduced religions like Judaism (prevalently in Ethiopia), Christianity, and Islam. Hinduism rarely spread to the continent, and through its origins in early Classical India, made relatively few forays outside of Southern Asia.

In Africa, only one country has a Hindu majority- the islands of Mauritius, located east of Madagascar. The British Empire, which included the Jewel of India, was responsible for some spread of Hinduism into the British-owned areas that became Kenya or South Africa. Post-colonially, Hinduism has gradually increased, particularly in Sub-Saharan Western Africa. Most famously, the Swami Ghanananda became a leader of the Hindu community in (you-guessed-it!) Ghana.
10. In Montreal, Romanian Vasile DÓba became the champion with a time of one minute, forty-six seconds, barely outpacing Zoltan Sztanity. In that year, the K-1 event made its debut as a 500 meter sprint. In contrast, in 2012 in London, both sprint and slalom events will take place, at Eton Dorney and the Lee Valley White Water Centre respectively. The final article I found on Wikipedia might be the most arcane of them all. What was the title?

Answer: Kayaking at the 1976 Summer Olympics

In the twentieth century, there was never an Underwater Basket Weaving Competition at the Olympics, though I'm sure Wikipedia would have information about it should the IOC have succumbed to allow the "sport!"

The actual title of the article was "Canoeing at the 1976 Summer Olympics- Men's K-1 500 metres". The K-1 implies that the event was for kayaking singles (C-2 would mean canoeing doubles). What's the difference? Kayakers use double-bladed paddles and usually sit with their legs in front of them. Kayaks are decked, with rounded bottoms, as opposed to canoes, which usually have flat bottoms. Canoes are generally used in lakes and rivers, while kayaks can be adapted for heavier waters, because they capsize less easily.
Source: Author adams627

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