Quiz about Lets Go Shopping At The Aztec Marketplace
Quiz about Lets Go Shopping At The Aztec Marketplace

Let's Go Shopping At The Aztec Marketplace Quiz


Every ancient Aztec city-state had a marketplace near the center. Thousands of people came daily to trade or buy goods. Let's take a stroll back in time through one of these 'shopping malls'.

A multiple-choice quiz by stephgm67. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
stephgm67
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
384,196
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
239
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. The first area we come to contains merchants offering pottery. These will be utilized for everyday use in the home or for ceremonial purposes. What is the typical color of the goods we see? Hint

Yellow on aqua
White on red
Black on orange
Turquoise on white

2. The next merchant we come to is selling a particular type of grain. In fact, it is the staple food of this Aztec culture. What food is he selling? Hint

Rice
Maize (corn)
Wheat
Oats

3. The next merchant is trying to sell us some blades to attach to our wooden sword called a macuahuitl. What are these blades made of that he has crafted? Hint

Steel
Obsidian
Claws
Copper

4. The next merchant we speak with is a tradesman who is offering up some lovely feathers from a local bird to be used in a headdress, fan, or cape. What kind of bird might this be that had these greenish blue iridescent feathers? Hint

Quetzal
Bald eagle
Flamingo
Heron

5. The next merchant we deal with has traveled from the banks of Lake Texcoco. He is offering us a seasoning that we will use in most of our dishes and to preserve our meat. What is it? Hint

Salt
Coriander
Black pepper
Nutmeg

6. We approach the next merchant, who is a jeweler. He has many golden necklaces and pendants but we are browsing through his ear plug selection. Why would a person wear this piece of jewelry, thick as a finger, through the ear lobe? Hint

To dress up
To show one's status in society
To display one's wealth based on the materials
Any of these reasons

7. The next Aztec merchant with whom we converse is a hunter who has brought back an array of skins to be used for clothing, household goods, and royal throne coverings. A popular one for nobility seemed to be the skin of this large local cat that was considered one of the bravest animals around. What is it? Hint

Jaguar
Lion
Tiger
Cheetah

8. All of this shopping has made us hungry, so we were fortunate that the next merchant was selling ready-to-eat mixiotes. The maguey, or American aloe, leaves are steamed and hold a delicious treat inside. What will we find when we bite into one? Hint

Pit roasted meat
Fried corn
Chocolate
Cheese

9. The next area at which we arrive is where we find several ticitls (curing doctors) who are selling their herbs and potions. They tell us they have a potion made with mesquite and morning dew that will help with certain ailments. In today's world we would go to an ophthalmologist for help. What are these healers treating? Hint

Anxiety
Stomach aches
Eye issues
Swollen feet

10. We are almost at the end of our Aztec marketplace adventure. We have done much bartering and trading but realize we are almost out of the local 'currency' with which to buy anything else. What is the item that the Aztecs used for this purpose? Hint

Cacao beans
Shells and beads
Gold coins
Paper


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The first area we come to contains merchants offering pottery. These will be utilized for everyday use in the home or for ceremonial purposes. What is the typical color of the goods we see?

Answer: Black on orange

Pottery was used from everything from plates and kitchen pots to urns found in funeral ceremonies. The traditional coloring was black design on orange clay which is today called Aztec III. Geometric shapes were the predominant artwork but one could also find images of animals or plants from the area. What is amazing about this work is that the Aztecs did not have use of a pottery wheel but instead used thin strips of clay and their imaginations and and craftsmanship.
2. The next merchant we come to is selling a particular type of grain. In fact, it is the staple food of this Aztec culture. What food is he selling?

Answer: Maize (corn)

Maize was eaten at almost every meal and served in a variety of ways including tortillas, tamales, stews, and gruel. Corn could be grown easily and was interwoven with their religion complete with a maize deity named Cinteotl. They often mixed the corn with lime or ashes which not only separated the kernels but added protein to the mix.
3. The next merchant is trying to sell us some blades to attach to our wooden sword called a macuahuitl. What are these blades made of that he has crafted?

Answer: Obsidian

Obsidian is a volcanic, glass-like rock that is created after lava hardens and cools. It can be found around the Aztec region and even was mined by them in some quarries. Aztec craftsmen could chip away at it and fracture it into pieces with curved edges that were razor sharp and thin. These pieces could then be inserted into a wooden sword to make a deadly weapon for close combat.
4. The next merchant we speak with is a tradesman who is offering up some lovely feathers from a local bird to be used in a headdress, fan, or cape. What kind of bird might this be that had these greenish blue iridescent feathers?

Answer: Quetzal

The Aztecs used feathers to decorate their clothing and accessories. Local wild birds, such as quetzals, macaws, parrots, and hummingbirds were valued for their bright feathers. Even domesticated birds, like the turkey or duck, were utilized. Shiny, brightly colored feathers were highly prized and dyeing or artificially creating color was frowned upon.

The male quetzal's long tail feathers were worn by nobles or kings as each bird had only two of these to offer!
5. The next merchant we deal with has traveled from the banks of Lake Texcoco. He is offering us a seasoning that we will use in most of our dishes and to preserve our meat. What is it?

Answer: Salt

Salt craft specialists took salty spring water and boiled it down to obtain the seasoning. They then distributed it and traded it in markets around the region. Salt and chili pepper were so important to cooking in the Aztec culture that fasting meant going without these two ingredients. Salt, however, had an added bonus of helping to preserve meat by drawing out the moisture.
6. We approach the next merchant, who is a jeweler. He has many golden necklaces and pendants but we are browsing through his ear plug selection. Why would a person wear this piece of jewelry, thick as a finger, through the ear lobe?

Answer: Any of these reasons

Both men and women wore these ear plugs. It took a period of time to slowly stretch the holes in the ear lobe to accommodate the various jewelry pieces. They could be made of different metals, leather, turquoise, or jewels. Not only did they serve to beautify a person and show off potential wealth via the material selection, but they identified a person's social rank.
7. The next Aztec merchant with whom we converse is a hunter who has brought back an array of skins to be used for clothing, household goods, and royal throne coverings. A popular one for nobility seemed to be the skin of this large local cat that was considered one of the bravest animals around. What is it?

Answer: Jaguar

To the Aztecs, the jaguar represented power and bravery. As such, it was the emblem of noble warriors and was worshipped as a god in their religion. Since jaguars were feared by other animals in their habitat they were considered leaders and the Aztec kings therefore also associated with the animal.

The jaguar's skins were used for capes, royal sandals, and throne coverings. These noble animals were also sacrificed to appease the gods.
8. All of this shopping has made us hungry, so we were fortunate that the next merchant was selling ready-to-eat mixiotes. The maguey, or American aloe, leaves are steamed and hold a delicious treat inside. What will we find when we bite into one?

Answer: Pit roasted meat

Aztecs made mixiotes by using the outside parts of the maguey leaves to wrap around a meat and chili pepper mixture. The meat was often rabbit and, after being wrapped in the protective leaves, was cooked over an open flame in a pit. When the diner unwrapped the bundle, the juicy chili and rabbit meat mixture created a form of stew.

In order to protect the plant's population, maguey leaves are no longer used, but banana leaves or paper can be used along with differing kinds of meat such as beef or chicken.
9. The next area at which we arrive is where we find several ticitls (curing doctors) who are selling their herbs and potions. They tell us they have a potion made with mesquite and morning dew that will help with certain ailments. In today's world we would go to an ophthalmologist for help. What are these healers treating?

Answer: Eye issues

Aztec doctors used a variety of healing methods including medicine, surgery, and magic. Amulets were given to ward off illnesses; however, if those did not work the doctors had local herbs and plants as well as those they purchased at the market. Aztec doctors were believers in cleanliness and thought illnesses could be cured by regular steam baths at the saunas found throughout the city-states. Citizens turned to these doctors for remedies ranging from battle wounds to love sickness.
10. We are almost at the end of our Aztec marketplace adventure. We have done much bartering and trading but realize we are almost out of the local 'currency' with which to buy anything else. What is the item that the Aztecs used for this purpose?

Answer: Cacao beans

Cacao beans (or cocoa) served not only as a drink but also as a form of currency for the Aztecs. They had a relatively low value and would not be used for large purchases but were definitely used for daily transactions within the marketplace. If the cacao bean was of good quality, it received a higher value in the economic system. So, for the Aztecs, money really did grow on trees!
Source: Author stephgm67

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