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Quiz about WWII  Strange  Interesting Facts 2
Quiz about WWII  Strange  Interesting Facts 2

WWII - Strange & Interesting Facts: 2 Quiz


This is my second "Strange and Interesting Facts" quiz on World War Two.

A multiple-choice quiz by HurricaneBill. Estimated time: 7 mins.
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Time
7 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
272,032
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Difficult
Avg Score
5 / 10
Plays
4366
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 1 (7/10), Guest 209 (3/10), Guest 96 (3/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. The US Navy put out a length of anchor chain that was how many times the depth of the water? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Who of the following performed an appendectomy on a sailor while aboard a US submarine? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. The USS Archerfish was an American submarine. What notable feat did it accomplish? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. What was notable about the American submarine USS Argonaut? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Which of these famous WWII figures had at least one artificial limb? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Germany had a number of "auxiliary cruisers" which were, in fact, armed merchant ships which looked like ordinary merchant ships and would generally fly the flag of a neutral nation until they were able to close in on unsuspecting Allied ships. When they got within range they would replace the flag with the German flag and expose their hidden guns. Of course, the lightly armed Allied ships had little chance. Listed below are four of these ships. Which was the most successful? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Who was Constance Babington-Smith? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Who was Norman Baillie-Stewart? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. What was noteworthy about the American Liberty ship S.S. Booker T. Washington? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Ezra Weston Loomis Pound (October 30, 1885 - November 1, 1972) was an American expatriate poet, musician, and critic who was a major figure of the Modernist movement in early-to mid-20th century poetry. He was the driving force behind several Modernist movements, notably Imagism and Vorticism. What was his WWII connection? Hint



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Feb 17 2024 : Guest 1: 7/10
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Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The US Navy put out a length of anchor chain that was how many times the depth of the water?

Answer: 4.5

Most people think it is the anchor that holds the ship in place but it is actually the weight of the chain.
2. Who of the following performed an appendectomy on a sailor while aboard a US submarine?

Answer: All of them

Lipes operated on Darrell Rector, Roby on W.R. Jones and Moore on George Platter.
3. The USS Archerfish was an American submarine. What notable feat did it accomplish?

Answer: It sank the 71,000 ton Japanese carrier Shinano four hours after it was launched

The Japanese spent four years constructing the huge Shinano and it only lasted four hours. It was the USS Batfish that sank three Japanese submarines in four days. It was the USS Finback that rescued Bush. I made up the other one.
4. What was notable about the American submarine USS Argonaut?

Answer: All of these

The Argonaut was 381 feet long and displaced 2,700 tons of water and had two six inch deck guns. It was too big to maneuver and presented a huge target. It was eventually sunk by Japanese destroyers on January 10, 1943.
5. Which of these famous WWII figures had at least one artificial limb?

Answer: They all did

We probably all knew about Bader. It is interesting to note that he had no legs before the war and yet he went on to score 22 kills.
6. Germany had a number of "auxiliary cruisers" which were, in fact, armed merchant ships which looked like ordinary merchant ships and would generally fly the flag of a neutral nation until they were able to close in on unsuspecting Allied ships. When they got within range they would replace the flag with the German flag and expose their hidden guns. Of course, the lightly armed Allied ships had little chance. Listed below are four of these ships. Which was the most successful?

Answer: Pinguin

I'll bet you picked the Atlantis, which sank 22 ships for 145,697 tons. The Pinguin, however, sank 32 ships for 154,619 tons. The Orion had 10 ships for 62,915 tons and the Komet had only 6 for 31,005 tons.
7. Who was Constance Babington-Smith?

Answer: A British Women's Auxiliary Air Force photo-reconnaissance expert

Babington-Smith was good at her job. Her specialty was German aircraft and she worked with the US Eighth Army Air Force to pinpoint aircraft factories as bombing targets. She is officially credited with being the first to recognize the Me-163 rocket plane and the V-1 buzz-bomb sites at Peenemuende.
8. Who was Norman Baillie-Stewart?

Answer: A former British Army officer who made propaganda broadcasts for the Germans

Baillie-Smith was an interesting man. In 1933, as a lieutenant in the Seaforth Highlanders, he was caught giving military secrets to the Germans. He was tried, convicted and spent five years in the Tower of London, where he was known as the "Officer in the Tower".

He became a German citizen when he was released. In 1945, he was captured in Austria and sentenced to five years for treason.
9. What was noteworthy about the American Liberty ship S.S. Booker T. Washington?

Answer: All of these

The Booker T. Washington was named for the famous American educator and founder of the Tuskegee Institute. He was born into slavery in 1856. The ship was launched on September 29, 1940 and was christened by the famous singer, Marian Anderson. Its captain was Hugh Mulzac who had earlier been offered the command of an all African-American ship and refused, saying that "under no circumstances will I command a Jim Crow vessel." Twenty-two years passed before Mulzac would again receive an offer to command a naval ship. During World War II, his demand for an integrated crew was finally met.
10. Ezra Weston Loomis Pound (October 30, 1885 - November 1, 1972) was an American expatriate poet, musician, and critic who was a major figure of the Modernist movement in early-to mid-20th century poetry. He was the driving force behind several Modernist movements, notably Imagism and Vorticism. What was his WWII connection?

Answer: He was a leading Axis propagandist while living in Italy

After the war, Pound was brought back to the United States to face charges of treason. He was found unfit to face trial by reason of insanity by a special federal jury and sent to a mental hospital in Washington, D.C., where he remained for 12 years from 1946 to 1958.

When asked, after his release, for his opinions on his home country Pound said, "America is a lunatic asylum." He later returned to Italy and lived there until his death.
Source: Author HurricaneBill

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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