Quiz about Vintage American Slang III
Quiz about Vintage American Slang III

Vintage American Slang III Trivia Quiz


This is the third and last of my slang quizzes. Have a good time and enjoy!

A multiple-choice quiz by Pick61. Estimated time: 3 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Humanities Trivia
  6. »
  7. Varieties of English
  8. »
  9. American Slang

Author
Pick61
Time
3 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
353,118
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
9 / 10
Plays
1417
Last 3 plays: Guest 172 (10/10), Guest 98 (9/10), Guest 73 (9/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. Have you ever been "Happy as a clam at high tide"? I'm sure you have, but why a clam? Why high tide? Hint

clams can easily find food at high tide
clams mate at high tide
clams are always happy
clams are safe from predators at high tide

2. A sudden, fierce rain storm might be described in what totally illogical manner? Hint

It's raining, you know
It's really coming down out there
It's raining cats and dogs
It's a real gully washer

3. Uncle George was complaining about an automobile he had purchased. He said he had bought a "pig in a poke". What did he mean? Hint

he had purchased an item unseen
he had paid too much for it
he had bought a small pig
he was getting a real bargain

4. If someone told you it was time to "face the music", what would he be advising you to do? Hint

turn around and look at the parade
take responsibility for a misdeed
tune in the radio or tv
buy a popular cd before they're sold out

5. From what US president do we get the advice, "If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen"? In other words, get on with the task at hand or get out of the way. He served as Franklin D. Roosevelt's vice president. Hint

Harry Truman
Richard Nixon
Dwight Eisenhower
Lyndon Johnson

6. If someone is "trying to pull the wool over your eyes", what is he attempting to do? Hint

shield you from the sun
blindfold you
deceive you
help you

7. A person who's not in control of his emotions or actions and who can do a lot of collateral damage may be described as what? Hint

a loose cannon
an accident looking for a place to happen
a crazy horse
a holy terror

8. If you refer to two people as being "joined at the hip", what are you implying? Hint

that they are lashed together by a rope or cord
that they are inordinately close
that they seem to read each other's mind
that they like a lot of the same things

9. If someone "gilds the lily", what faux pas has he or she committed? Hint

wrapped a flower in gold leaf
grown a really lousy looking lot of plants
spent a lot of money for flowers
added unnecessary adornment to something

10. My Aunt Martha told me that upon meeting my Uncle George for the first time, she was "on cloud nine". In what condition would you be if you were on cloud nine? Hint

you are deliriously happy to the point of being oblivious to your surroundings
you've wound up in a penthouse
you're in an airplane
you're drunk


(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Have you ever been "Happy as a clam at high tide"? I'm sure you have, but why a clam? Why high tide?

Answer: clams are safe from predators at high tide

This term has been in use since the early 18th century. It is thought to have originated in New England. It was presumed that clams feel safe and content during periods of high water due to lack of predators, namely humans.
2. A sudden, fierce rain storm might be described in what totally illogical manner?

Answer: It's raining cats and dogs

"Raining cats and dogs" comes from 17th century England. Excessive rain and unsanitary conditions could cause the carcasses of dead animals to be washed into the streets.
3. Uncle George was complaining about an automobile he had purchased. He said he had bought a "pig in a poke". What did he mean?

Answer: he had purchased an item unseen

A poke is an old term for sack or bag. Still in use in rural America, the term comes from an old English poem dated 1555. "I will neur bye the pig in the poke". In other words, make the seller let the pig out so you can see him.
4. If someone told you it was time to "face the music", what would he be advising you to do?

Answer: take responsibility for a misdeed

The phrase has been used in America since the mid 19th century, and possibly refers to an actor stepping out on the stage and facing the orchestra pit, beyond which is the audience, to deliver his lines. Another school of thought is that it referred to an officer being drummed out of military service.
5. From what US president do we get the advice, "If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen"? In other words, get on with the task at hand or get out of the way. He served as Franklin D. Roosevelt's vice president.

Answer: Harry Truman

This phrase is still widely used in the U.S. Records showed Truman first used it in a 1942 memo in which he advised some aides who were complaining about their workload.
6. If someone is "trying to pull the wool over your eyes", what is he attempting to do?

Answer: deceive you

This comes from the early 19th century. A Milwaukee newspaper described a local politician's trickery as "an attempt to pull the wool over the eyes of the people". It may spring from a time when wearing a woolen wig was a popular fashion statement, especially among the wealthy.
7. A person who's not in control of his emotions or actions and who can do a lot of collateral damage may be described as what?

Answer: a loose cannon

This term comes from an 1874 Victor Hugo novel in which he describes a ship's cannon which has broken loose from its moorings and causes several fatalities among the crew. It was quoted in a news article in 1889 and became a part of American English.
8. If you refer to two people as being "joined at the hip", what are you implying?

Answer: that they are inordinately close

It may have originally been a reference to Chang and Eng Bunker, Siamese twins who lived in the 1830's, although they really weren't joined at the hip, but at the chest. The phrase seems to have appeared about 1960; the first reference was a newspaper article declaring that Cal Tech (California) and the Pasadena chamber of commerce seemed to be "joined at the hip."
9. If someone "gilds the lily", what faux pas has he or she committed?

Answer: added unnecessary adornment to something

The idiom as originally used was "gild the lily and paint the rose". Even this is a misquote. It comes from Shakespeare's "The Life and Death of King John". In part, the line was "to gild refined gold, to paint the lily, to add another hue to a rainbow ... is wasteful and ridiculous excess".
10. My Aunt Martha told me that upon meeting my Uncle George for the first time, she was "on cloud nine". In what condition would you be if you were on cloud nine?

Answer: you are deliriously happy to the point of being oblivious to your surroundings

"Cloud nine" was popularized by a 1950's detective show on radio called "Johnny Dollar". The hero, when knocked unconcious, would be transported to cloud nine where his alter ego would feed him clues and help him solve a crime. Being drunk had been described as being on "Cloud Eight".
Source: Author Pick61

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor looney_tunes before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
Most Recent Scores
Nov 22 2022 : Guest 172: 10/10
Nov 18 2022 : Guest 98: 9/10
Nov 17 2022 : Guest 73: 9/10
Nov 17 2022 : Guest 24: 8/10
Nov 17 2022 : Guest 131: 10/10
Nov 17 2022 : shvdotr: 10/10
Nov 17 2022 : 1nn1: 9/10
Nov 17 2022 : fado72: 10/10
Nov 17 2022 : maninmidohio: 10/10

Score Distribution

quiz
12/3/2022, Copyright 2022 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us