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Quiz about Paddling the River Cam
Quiz about Paddling the River Cam

Paddling the River Cam Trivia Quiz


The River Cam flows through Cambridge, England. These people are associated with the city, whether they paddled there or not.

A multiple-choice quiz by dellastreet. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
dellastreet
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
412,276
Updated
Apr 16 23
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
205
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Upstart3 (9/10), John01245 (8/10), Guest 86 (10/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. This fellow had his chance to paddle the River Cam, but ended up thousands of miles away. Which graduate of Emmanuel College gave his name to a university in another Cambridge altogether? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. This playwright poet wrote about Leander swimming the Hellespont, so perhaps he did paddle the River Cam - who knows? There again he may or may not have been a spy, faked his death, and continued writing under the name William Shakespeare. All that can be said for sure is that he studied at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. Who was this mysterious man? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Paddling the River Cam was not a safe option in the 1660s, when bubonic plague ravaged the country. Better to go home like this scientist did and work on calculus and gravitation, while observing falling apples. Who was he? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Paddling the River Cam might be considered too frivolous an activity for this Puritan poet, and blindness in later life could have made it impossible, but perhaps he looked back on his pre-civil war Cambridge days as a secular paradise lost. Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Some young men in 1930s Cambridge had bigger things on their mind than paddling the River Cam: they had been recruited to betray their country. Three of them would ultimately flee to Moscow, but which of these Cambridge Spies remained in Britain, only being publicly exposed decades afterwards? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. For Cambridge natives Syd Barrett and David Gilmour, music was more important than paddling the River Cam. Of which rock band were they members? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Paddling the River Cam seems just the sort of thing the girls of St Trinian's would enjoy. Nigel Molesworth might give it a go as well. Which Cambridge-born cartoonist created or illustrated these characters? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Though born in Cambridge, this singer didn't stick around long enough to paddle the River Cam. Whose travels took her first to Australia, then on to Rydell High School and to Xanadu? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Paddling the River Cam, or at least rowing on it, might be considered compulsory when your father rowed to Olympic gold. This student rowed his way into the Cambridge crew for the 1980 University Boat Race, though sadly they lost. Fortunately a comedy career awaited. Which future TV doctor was this? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. A self-made millionaire, Cambridge-born David Robinson probably had little time for paddling the River Cam. He gave away all of his money, establishing a Cambridge college bearing his name and a hospital bearing that of his mother. How did he make much of his money? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This fellow had his chance to paddle the River Cam, but ended up thousands of miles away. Which graduate of Emmanuel College gave his name to a university in another Cambridge altogether?

Answer: John Harvard

John Harvard studied at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, between 1627 and 1635. He emigrated to New England in 1637, ministering to a congregation in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, but died the following year, aged 30. Childless and having inherited money from a family severely reduced in size by the bubonic plague, he left half his fortune and his considerable library to a college proposed for Newtowne, Massachusetts.

The town was renamed Cambridge, after the alma mater of many local ministers, and the college named Harvard after its major benefactor.

He is represented in a stained glass window in the chapel of Emmanuel College, Cambridge.
2. This playwright poet wrote about Leander swimming the Hellespont, so perhaps he did paddle the River Cam - who knows? There again he may or may not have been a spy, faked his death, and continued writing under the name William Shakespeare. All that can be said for sure is that he studied at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. Who was this mysterious man?

Answer: Christopher Marlowe

Author of "Hero and Leander" and pioneer in the use of blank verse on the stage, Christopher Marlowe was the leading playwright before Shakespeare. Attending the University of Cambridge on a scholarship, he almost had his MA degree withheld because of suspicions that he planned to study at the English Catholic Seminary in Rheims. He was also suspected of atheism, just as dangerous as Catholicism, and faced possible capital charges at the time of his mysterious death, aged 29, in 1593.

Details of his inquest, later shown to have been illegally held, only became known in the 1920s and failed to clear up the mystery. His assailant, who claimed to have acted in self-defence, and the two witnesses had all been government agents whose word could not be relied upon. The consensus today seems to be that Marlowe probably was a spy and that he was murdered, but the details will never be known.

Although Shakespeare was certainly influenced by Marlowe, whose death is alluded to in "As You Like It", the Marlovian Theory, that Shakespeare was a front for the still-living Marlowe, is generally discounted. Marlowe has recently been credited with co-authoring Shakespeare's Henry VI trilogy, though this attribution remains contentious.
3. Paddling the River Cam was not a safe option in the 1660s, when bubonic plague ravaged the country. Better to go home like this scientist did and work on calculus and gravitation, while observing falling apples. Who was he?

Answer: Isaac Newton

Cambridge University closed between 1665 and 1667, during which time Newton pursued his studies at home in Woolsthorpe, Lincolnshire. Newton is credited, alongside Gottfried Leibniz, with the development of calculus and formulated the laws of motion and the law of universal gravitation.

His thoughts on gravity were said to have been inspired by apples falling from a tree in the Woolsthorpe garden. A descendant of this tree grows outside Trinity College, Cambridge, where he studied.
4. Paddling the River Cam might be considered too frivolous an activity for this Puritan poet, and blindness in later life could have made it impossible, but perhaps he looked back on his pre-civil war Cambridge days as a secular paradise lost.

Answer: John Milton

After graduating from Christ's College, Cambridge, John Milton traveled widely in Europe, meeting Galileo among others. He returned to England in 1639, before the outbreak of civil war. A strong supporter of the Parliamentary cause, he was appointed Secretary for Foreign Tongues to the Commonwealth Council of State in 1649, weeks after the execution of King Charles I. He retained the post, which involved composing foreign correspondence and producing propaganda, until 1660, but was totally blind from 1652 and therefore had to dictate all his work to amanuenses.

The first modern poet to employ unrhymed verse, Milton dictated "Paradise Lost" between 1658 and 1664. Briefly imprisoned following the Restoration in 1660, he died in 1674, impoverished but famous throughout Europe. The alternative answers were all Cavalier Poets.
5. Some young men in 1930s Cambridge had bigger things on their mind than paddling the River Cam: they had been recruited to betray their country. Three of them would ultimately flee to Moscow, but which of these Cambridge Spies remained in Britain, only being publicly exposed decades afterwards?

Answer: Anthony Blunt

Believing that only the USSR was capable of defeating fascism, the Cambridge Spies were recruited by the Soviet intelligence service, in the hope that they would rise to prominent positions in the British establishment. These hopes were more than realised. Burgess and Maclean fled to the Soviet Union in 1951, having been tipped off by Philby, who himself defected in 1963.

Anthony Blunt, who was older than the other three and had acted as a talent spotter, confessed in 1964 to having passed on wartime secrets whilst working for MI5 and was given immunity from prosecution. A distinguished art historian and Surveyor of the King's/Queen's Pictures, he was knighted in 1956. The knighthood was revoked after he was publicly identified as a traitor in 1979.
6. For Cambridge natives Syd Barrett and David Gilmour, music was more important than paddling the River Cam. Of which rock band were they members?

Answer: Pink Floyd

Syd Barrett formed Pink Floyd, originally known as the Tea Set, in 1965 with Nick Mason, Roger Waters and Richard Wright. David Gilmour joined in 1968 and Barrett, who had renamed the band after blues musicians Pink Anderson and Floyd Council, was forced to leave later that year because of mental health issues. Pink Floyd went on to become one of the most successful musical acts of all time.

Their 1967 debut album "The Piper at the Gates of Dawn" and 1979 album "The Wall" were inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame and the band was inducted into the US Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996.
7. Paddling the River Cam seems just the sort of thing the girls of St Trinian's would enjoy. Nigel Molesworth might give it a go as well. Which Cambridge-born cartoonist created or illustrated these characters?

Answer: Ronald Searle

The anarchic, even murderous girls of St Trinian's made their first appearance in 1941, but found fame in a comic strip series starting in 1946. They were inspired by the pupils of two private schools in Cambridge and the school's name was taken from St Trinnean's, a progressive girls' school in Edinburgh. The girls proved so popular that they featured in a series of British film comedies, starting with "The Belles of St Trinians" in 1954.

Nigel Molesworth, self-styled "Curse of St Custard's", appeared in a subsequent cartoon series, written by Geoffrey Willans and illustrated by Searle and collected in a series of books beginning with "Down with Skool!" in 1953. Searle's cartoons featured in the credit sequences for the St Trinian's films and for "Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines" and "Monte Carlo or Bust".

On a more serious note, taken prisoner by the Japanese after the fall of Singapore in 1942, while close to death Searle had secretly documented in his drawings the brutal conditions under which those working on the Burma railway were kept. He subsequently worked as a courtroom artist at the Nuremberg trials and the trial of Adolf Eichmann.
8. Though born in Cambridge, this singer didn't stick around long enough to paddle the River Cam. Whose travels took her first to Australia, then on to Rydell High School and to Xanadu?

Answer: Olivia Newton-John

Olivia Newton-John emigrated with her family to Melbourne at the age of five. As a teenager she returned to the UK, winning Best British Female Vocalist awards and representing Britain in the Eurovision Song Contest. She moved to the USA in 1974 and went on to star as Sandy in the 1978 movie "Grease" and opposite Gene Kelly in 1980 film "Xanadu".
9. Paddling the River Cam, or at least rowing on it, might be considered compulsory when your father rowed to Olympic gold. This student rowed his way into the Cambridge crew for the 1980 University Boat Race, though sadly they lost. Fortunately a comedy career awaited. Which future TV doctor was this?

Answer: Hugh Laurie

Hugh Laurie's father won a gold medal competing in the coxless pairs at the 1948 London Olympics. As well as rowing at Cambridge Hugh Laurie was president of Footlights, the university's theatrical club. Following a successful British TV comedy career, including "Blackadder" and "Jeeves and Wooster", he won two Golden Globe awards for his portrayal of Dr Gregory House.
10. A self-made millionaire, Cambridge-born David Robinson probably had little time for paddling the River Cam. He gave away all of his money, establishing a Cambridge college bearing his name and a hospital bearing that of his mother. How did he make much of his money?

Answer: Renting television sets

Born in 1904, David Robinson left school at 15 to work in his father's Cambridge bicycle shop, subsequently moving to Bedford to take over a garage. He opened his first radio and electrical shop there in the late 1930s, expanding into other towns after the war. The demand for television sets exploded after Queen Elizabeth's coronation in 1953 and he established Robinson Rentals, a TV rental business which he sold for 8 million pounds in 1968.

Also an extremely successful racehorse owner, Robinson set up a charitable trust, demanding high standards of business efficiency from any recipients. He donated 18 million for the establishment of Robinson College, Cambridge, formally opened in 1981. The trust also donated 3 million pounds towards the building of a long-delayed maternity hospital in Cambridge on condition that it was completed six years earlier than originally planned and in half the usual time. The Rosie Hospital, opened in 1983 and now part of Addenbrooke's Hospital, was named in honour of Robinson's mother, who died in childbirth in 1922.
Source: Author dellastreet

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor ponycargirl before going online.
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