Quiz about Duck and Dive
Quiz about Duck and Dive

Duck and Dive Trivia Quiz


Walking along my local river I can see several species of ducks and other water fowl. This quiz is about the birds I saw on one of my walks in the English countryside.

A multiple-choice quiz by clevercatz. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
clevercatz
Time
3 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
392,879
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
513
Last 3 plays: Guest 47 (5/10), Guest 90 (10/10), Guest 87 (8/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. The first duck I saw on my walk is one of the most familiar in Britain. The male has a dark green head and the female is a mottled brown colour. What duck did I spot? Hint

Mallard
Widgeon
Teal
Gadwell

2. The next duck I saw was a small dabbling duck with a chestnut head, broad green eye patches and a black beak. What duck, with the scientific name Anas crecca, had I just seen? Hint

Mallard
Gadwell
Garganey
Teal

3. Rounding a bend in the river I saw a large, rather goose-like, duck with a dark green head, a red beak, some black markings and a chestnut breastband. What duck, with the scientific name Tadorna tadorna, was it? Hint

Shelduck
Pintail
Shoveler
Mallard

4. Swimming on the river not far away was a black waterbird with a distinctive white bill and forehead which gave the impression that it was bald. What breed of bird was it? Hint

Water Rail
Teal
Pintail
Coot

5. The next bird I saw on the water was a black waterfowl with a red beak with a yellow tip and a red forehead. What bird was I looking at? Hint

Water Rail
Gadwell
Widgeon
Moorhen

6. The next bird I saw is one of Britain's largest and heaviest birds. It was white with a long s-shaped neck and an orange bill with a black base. What kind of bird was it? Hint

Canada Goose
Shoveler
Shelduck
Mute Swan

7. The next bird I saw was an elegant bird with a long white neck, ornate head plumes and a sharp beak. With the scientific name Podiceps cristatus what bird was I seeing? Hint

Gadwell
Widgeon
Mallard
Great Crested Grebe

8. The next waterbirds I encountered on my walk were a large group of geese with distinctive black heads and necks and large white throat patches. I knew the breed had been introduced into Britain from North America. What breed of goose was it? Hint

Bean Goose
Brent Goose
Canada Goose
Graylag Goose

9. Another bird I saw on my walk was a small waterbird with a short bill and a blunt looking rear. I knew this bird was called a dabchick. What other name is it known by? Hint

Pochard
Little grebe
Mandarin
Smew

10. Just as I was nearing the end of my walk I saw a blur of glistening blue flash across the river. What bird, with the scientific name Alcedo atthis, did I nearly see? Hint

Bee-eater
Kingfisher
Swift
Hoopoe




Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The first duck I saw on my walk is one of the most familiar in Britain. The male has a dark green head and the female is a mottled brown colour. What duck did I spot?

Answer: Mallard

The mallard (scientific name Anas platyrhynchos) is one of the most familiar ducks seen on the river. The females are very plain in comparison to the males. The females are mainly brown whereas the males have a shiny green head with a white ring around their necks.

It is the female that makes the familiar "quack" noises while the male makes a rasping sound for their call. Most mallard ducks spend the majority of their days in the water.
2. The next duck I saw was a small dabbling duck with a chestnut head, broad green eye patches and a black beak. What duck, with the scientific name Anas crecca, had I just seen?

Answer: Teal

The teal is smaller than the mallard and the male has very distinctive colouring whereas the female resembles a smaller, more delicate, female mallard. The collective name for teals is a "spring" which refers to their manner of taking off from the water in an almost vertical way and then corkscrewing this way and that in flight.
3. Rounding a bend in the river I saw a large, rather goose-like, duck with a dark green head, a red beak, some black markings and a chestnut breastband. What duck, with the scientific name Tadorna tadorna, was it?

Answer: Shelduck

Shelducks are big, colourful ducks which are bigger than a mallard but slightly smaller than a goose. Both sexes have dark green heads and necks, a chestnut breastband and a red beak although the male is larger and brighter than the female and has a pronounced knob at the base of the bill.
4. Swimming on the river not far away was a black waterbird with a distinctive white bill and forehead which gave the impression that it was bald. What breed of bird was it?

Answer: Coot

Coots (scientific name Fulica atra) are Britain's largest species of rail. They are plump wading birds and the male and female are alike. They are often seen in flocks and accompanying larger species of birds, such as swans, where they pick up food disturbed or discarded by the larger birds. Coots can easily dive underwater up to a depth of about two metres.

The expression "bald as a coot" is derived from their distinctive white heads.
5. The next bird I saw on the water was a black waterfowl with a red beak with a yellow tip and a red forehead. What bird was I looking at?

Answer: Moorhen

Moorhens (scientific name Gallinula chloropus) are slightly smaller than their close relative, the coot. They feed on both land and water and so have a varied diet of leaves, berries, seeds, worms, fish and snails. They are also known to eat other birds' eggs. They are sometimes referred to as marsh hens or water hens.
6. The next bird I saw is one of Britain's largest and heaviest birds. It was white with a long s-shaped neck and an orange bill with a black base. What kind of bird was it?

Answer: Mute Swan

Mute swans (scientific name Cygnus olor) can have a wingspan of up to 2.4 metres and are the second largest waterfowl after the trumpeter swan. Despite their name they produce a variety of noises including whistles, grunts and snorting noises. Male swans are called cobs, females are called pens and baby swans are called cygnets.
7. The next bird I saw was an elegant bird with a long white neck, ornate head plumes and a sharp beak. With the scientific name Podiceps cristatus what bird was I seeing?

Answer: Great Crested Grebe

Great crested grebes are graceful waterbirds with an ornate plumage. They dive into the water to feed and are known for their elaborate courtship displays on the water. On land they look clumsy as their legs are placed so far back on their bodies. In the 19th century the great crested grebe almost became extinct in Britain as their feathers were much prized for decorating hats and clothes.

The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) stopped this barbaric practice and now they are a common sight on British waterways.
8. The next waterbirds I encountered on my walk were a large group of geese with distinctive black heads and necks and large white throat patches. I knew the breed had been introduced into Britain from North America. What breed of goose was it?

Answer: Canada Goose

The Canada goose (scientific name Branta canadensis) is an introduced species of goose from North America which has successfully spread across most of Britain. They were originally introduced into Britain in 1665 as ornamental birds. They form noisy flocks and are often considered as a nuisance in areas such as public parks.
9. Another bird I saw on my walk was a small waterbird with a short bill and a blunt looking rear. I knew this bird was called a dabchick. What other name is it known by?

Answer: Little grebe

The little grebe (scientific name Tachybaptus ruficollis) is the smallest member of the grebe family. They are very good divers and swimmers and dive to seek fish beneath the water. They do not move well on land and rarely come ashore except to breed. If disturbed, little grebes dive underwater and resurface some distance away.

They also submerge themselves so that only their head is showing above the water.
10. Just as I was nearing the end of my walk I saw a blur of glistening blue flash across the river. What bird, with the scientific name Alcedo atthis, did I nearly see?

Answer: Kingfisher

The kingfisher is a stunning electric blue and orange coloured bird which is an expert fisherman. Even though they are so brightly coloured they are extremely shy and notoriously difficult to see except when they are in flight. Kingfishers need to eat their own body weight in food each day to survive.

Their diet is mainly fish but they supplement their intake with aquatic insects such as water beetles.
Source: Author clevercatz

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor rossian before going online.
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This quiz is part of series Commission #52:

If it's not one thing, it's another. In this quiz, titles were fairly straight forward-- two things separated by the articles 'and' and 'or'. This fifty-second Commission was put in front of the Author's Lounge in May 2018.

  1. Animal or Mineral Easier
  2. California or Bust Enhancement Average
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  4. Duck and Dive Easier
  5. By Hook or By Crook Average
  6. Fact Or Fiction Tough
  7. Still And Sparkling Average
  8. Lemon or Lime Average
  9. All or Nothing Average
  10. Friend or Foe Very Easy
  11. Card or Cash Easier
  12. Spicy or Mild Very Easy

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