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Quiz about Trivially European
Quiz about Trivially European

Trivially European Trivia Quiz


Every country has its unusual and/or historical sites, and many of them have also become popular visitor attractions. Let's take a look at some of these from around Europe.

A photo quiz by EnglishJedi. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
EnglishJedi
Time
5 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
377,704
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
816
Last 3 plays: Jennifer5 (8/10), Guest 2 (5/10), Guest 85 (5/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. Some 9,871 feet above sea level, at the top of the 'Zugspitze', stands this 14-foot high gilder iron cross erected in 1851. Frequently damaged by lightning strikes and once shot by an American soldier, the cross has been repaired numerous times. To see this particular site, though, you will need to climb to which country's highest point? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Opened in 1913 and now the permanent home of the International Court of Justice, The Peace Palace is not only an important official building but also a popular tourist attraction in which European country? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Originally named 'Viapori', this UNESCO World Heritage Site spread over six islands is now a picturesque picnic site, equally popular with both locals and tourists. It was originally built, though, as a sea fortress to protect which European capital city? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Built by Emperor Galerius in 298 A.D., the ancient Roman complex of palaces and temples called Felix Romuliana is located near the city of Zajecar, just south of the River Danube. In which country can you visit this amazing archaeological site? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Some of the henges at 'Gobekli Tepe' are constructed around 12,000 B.C., which makes them almost ten millennia older than England's famous Stonehenge. These circles of what were originally massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected during the Pre-Pottery Neolithic 'A' period. Uncovered some 2,500 feet above sea level on a mountain ridge just to the northeast of the city of Şanlıurfa, in which country are these amazing finds located? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. The picturesque Trakai Island Castle sits on an island in Lake Galve. The stone buildings date back to the late 14th and early 15th centuries. Once of great strategic importance, the castle is now a major tourist attraction. In which country can you find it? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Some more Roman ruins for you to visit, this time in Spain. The Puente Romano, a Roman bridge crossing the Guadiana River, the Acueducto de los Milagros (pictured) and the remains of the Forum, including the Temple of Diana, are all part of the Archaeological Ensemble in which city in western Spain? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. The pictured building looks like an old schoolhouse or, perhaps, a museum. Built in 1881, it is, though, the home of a national parliament. In the unicameral system, voters from six constituencies each elect nine members each, with the remaining seats allocated to parties based on their share of the vote, to produce a 63-member chamber. This is the government of which island nation? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. The picture shows a night-time view of the 'Groenerei' ("Grand Canal") in one of my favourite cities in the world. A Belgium provincial capital, this city's historic centre is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Which lovely city is this?
Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Built in 1897, between 1920 and 1985 the 'Riesenrad' was the world's largest extant ferris wheel. It stands near to the entrance to 'Wurstelprater', an amusement park located in the suburb of Leopoldstadt, in which European capital city? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Some 9,871 feet above sea level, at the top of the 'Zugspitze', stands this 14-foot high gilder iron cross erected in 1851. Frequently damaged by lightning strikes and once shot by an American soldier, the cross has been repaired numerous times. To see this particular site, though, you will need to climb to which country's highest point?

Answer: Germany

The highest peak in the Wetterstein Mountains in the Eastern Alps, Zugspitze is also Germany's high point. It is located in the extreme south of the country and the border between Germany and Austria crosses the mountain's western summit. On the flanks of Zugspitze, you will also find Germany's two largest glaciers: Northern Schneeferner, with an area of 77 acres and an average thickness of 56 feet, (both the largest and the highest, at 8,660 feet, glacier in Germany); and the 61-acre Höllentalferner Glacier.

Zugspitze was first climbed officially in 1820 although there are claims that locals conquered the peak more than 50 years earlier. Thirty-one years after that, in August 1851, an expedition of 28 climbers scaled the mountain, each of them carrying one of the pieces that make up the 14-foot tall Zugspitze Summit Cross.
2. Opened in 1913 and now the permanent home of the International Court of Justice, The Peace Palace is not only an important official building but also a popular tourist attraction in which European country?

Answer: Netherlands

A treaty signed at the 1899 Hague Peace Conference created the Permanent Court of Arbitration with the worthy objective of ending war. Funded by the philanthropist Andrew Carnegie, the Neo-Renaissance Peace Palace was officially opened in The Hague, Netherlands, on August 28, 1913. So much for that great idea -- exactly eleven months later, the "War to End All Wars" began.

Since 1946, the building has housed the United Nations' primary judicial body, the International Court of Justice -- this should not be confused with the high-profile International Criminal Court where individuals are prosecuted for war crimes, genocide and crimes against humanity, which is located elsewhere in The Hague. Also located in the Peace Palace are the Peace Palace Library of International Law (since 1913) and the Hague Academy of International Law, founded in 1923.
3. Originally named 'Viapori', this UNESCO World Heritage Site spread over six islands is now a picturesque picnic site, equally popular with both locals and tourists. It was originally built, though, as a sea fortress to protect which European capital city?

Answer: Helsinki

Russian expansionism prompted the Swedish crown, which then controlled what is now Finland, to begin building this sea fortress in Helsinki Harbor in 1748. It was based on the concept of the 'star fort' style of fortification, adapted for the particular problems of building on a group of rocky islands.

Named Viapori by the Finns and called Sveaborg by the Swedes, construction was finally completed in the 1760s, officer training began there in 1770 and the naval military school officially opened in 1779. Alas, just 60 years after the major project began, in 1808 during the Finnish War, the fortress surrendered to Russia. The occupation of Finland by Russian troops began the following year.

In 1918, encouraged by patriotism and nationalistic feeling at the end of World War I, the Finns renamed the island fortress 'Suomenlinna' (meaning "Castle of Finland"), although it is still known by some today as Viapori. The site was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Cultural Site in 1991.
4. Built by Emperor Galerius in 298 A.D., the ancient Roman complex of palaces and temples called Felix Romuliana is located near the city of Zajecar, just south of the River Danube. In which country can you visit this amazing archaeological site?

Answer: Serbia

The ten-acre complex located at the spa resort of Gamzigrad in eastern Serbia contains some of the world's most important ancient Roman ruins. Designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Cultural Site in 2007, Galerius ordered construction of what is believed to be an Imperial Palace here to mark the site of his birth and named it in honour of his mother, Romula. (Both Galerius and Romula are also buried here.) Plundered by the Huns in the 5th century, it was abandoned in the 7th century when the Slavs occupied the region.

Highlights for tourists include the exceptional mosaics depicting the Greek gods Dionysos and Medusa and figures of Hercules. Hoards of Roman artefacts have been excavated from the site, including many portraits of Roman emperors, and numerous Roman gold coins which have helped to date the site.

Felix Romuliana is one of the stops on the "Roman Emperors' Birthplace Trail" which links 17 sites within what is now Serbia.
5. Some of the henges at 'Gobekli Tepe' are constructed around 12,000 B.C., which makes them almost ten millennia older than England's famous Stonehenge. These circles of what were originally massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected during the Pre-Pottery Neolithic 'A' period. Uncovered some 2,500 feet above sea level on a mountain ridge just to the northeast of the city of Şanlıurfa, in which country are these amazing finds located?

Answer: Turkey

Gobekli Tepe translates into English as "Potbelly Hill". Archaeologists have been slowly excavating this incredible site at Orencik in southern Turkey since 1996, and they believe that the most ancient artefacts may date back to the end of the Pleistocene, more than 15,000 years ago. So far, more than 200 20-foot high pillars, each weighing as much as 20 tonnes, have been either uncovered or identified by topographic scans.

A truly amazing site!
6. The picturesque Trakai Island Castle sits on an island in Lake Galve. The stone buildings date back to the late 14th and early 15th centuries. Once of great strategic importance, the castle is now a major tourist attraction. In which country can you find it?

Answer: Lithuania

The Duke of Trakai was the monarch of the Lithuanians and the Ruthenians during medieval times. Trakai Island Castle, sometimes referred to as "Little Marienburg", was the Grand Duchy of Lithuania's royal palace and a national stronghold.

The castle was later used as a prison and was abandoned in the 17th century. Restoration of the buildings and of the original frescoes painted on the interior walls was carried out by both the Russians and the Germans during their occupations in the early 20th century. A major reconstruction project that began in 1946 was completed fifteen years later.
7. Some more Roman ruins for you to visit, this time in Spain. The Puente Romano, a Roman bridge crossing the Guadiana River, the Acueducto de los Milagros (pictured) and the remains of the Forum, including the Temple of Diana, are all part of the Archaeological Ensemble in which city in western Spain?

Answer: Merida

Founded as the Roman town of Emerita Augusta in 25 B.C., it was the capital of the province of Lusitania which included all of modern-day Portugal and much of western Spain. It remained an important city through the periods of the Roman province of Hispania, the Muslim takeover of the early 7th century and subsequent Christian rule beginning in 1230. Renamed Merida the city of just over 58,000 (2012 Census) is the capital of one of Spain's 17 autonomous communities, Extremadura.

Although many of Merida's historical treasures were either destroyed or damaged during the Napoleonic invasion of the early 1800s, the city is still today home to more important ancient Roman monuments than any other Spanish site. The Temple of Diana, the 1st-century Arch of Trajan, the Villa Mitreo with its spectacular mosaic pavements, and Puente Romano, the longest of all surviving Roman bridges are amongst the highlights. Only 38 of the 82-foot high arched pillars of the magnificent Acueducto de los Milagros (meaning "Miraculous Aqueduct") remain: just 2,720 feet (or about half a mile) of the original 3.1 miles are still standing.
8. The pictured building looks like an old schoolhouse or, perhaps, a museum. Built in 1881, it is, though, the home of a national parliament. In the unicameral system, voters from six constituencies each elect nine members each, with the remaining seats allocated to parties based on their share of the vote, to produce a 63-member chamber. This is the government of which island nation?

Answer: Iceland

Established in the year 930, Iceland's Althing is the world's oldest extant parliamentary institution. Its original home was located some 30 miles east of what would later become the city of Reykjavik, now the national capital. The Althing made the short journey to the west in 1844 and, in 1881, moved into the purpose-built building pictured, constructed of hewn Icelandic stone.
9. The picture shows a night-time view of the 'Groenerei' ("Grand Canal") in one of my favourite cities in the world. A Belgium provincial capital, this city's historic centre is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Which lovely city is this?

Answer: Bruges

The first fortifications here were built by the Romans in the 1st century B.C. Receiving its city charter in 1128, Bruges became an important city due to its location on numerous trade routes. One of the best-preserved medieval cities in the world, as travel became a more realistic proposition in the latter half of the 19th century Bruges established itself as one of the world's first "tourist destinations". Today, it is the capital of West Flanders in the Flemish Region of Belgium and this wonderful city attracts more than two million tourists annually.
10. Built in 1897, between 1920 and 1985 the 'Riesenrad' was the world's largest extant ferris wheel. It stands near to the entrance to 'Wurstelprater', an amusement park located in the suburb of Leopoldstadt, in which European capital city?

Answer: Vienna

The 212-foot tall Wiener Riesenrad ("Vienna Giant Wheel") is one of the major tourist attractions in the Austrian capital, as well as one of the city's most recognizable symbols.

The demolition of the 20-year old, 328-foot high 'Grande Roue de Paris' in 1920 left Vienna's wheel as the world's tallest. It retained this distinction for 65 years until the completion of the 279-foot high Technostar in Japan. Vienna's wheel has featured in numerous blockbuster movies, notably "The Third Man" (in 1949) and James Bond's "The Living Daylights" (in 1987).

Wurstelprater, the amusement park behind the giant ferris wheel, occupies ground that was once the imperial hunting ground until Emperor Josef II opened it to the public in 1766.
Source: Author EnglishJedi

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor Tizzabelle before going online.
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