Quiz about Eating Like a Vegan
Quiz about Eating Like a Vegan

Eating Like a Vegan Trivia Quiz


My friend Ronit is a vegan so when she comes to dinner I have to accommodate. In doing so, I've learned a lot about the vegan diet that I want to share with you in this quiz.

A multiple-choice quiz by CSLwoman. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
CSLwoman
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
396,579
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
418
Last 3 plays: Guest 67 (6/10), Murphy7 (7/10), Guest 104 (7/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. Which one of these people will not eat any animal products at all? Hint

The vegan
The pesco pollo vegetarian
The lacto ovo vegetarian
The pescatarian

2. I'm making a salad for a vegan so I'll have to be careful to add all the nutrition I can. I've already got the spinach and tomatoes and veggies for iron and vitamins, but I think I need something with protein. What can I add? Hint

Black lentils
Sliced mushrooms
Slices of orange
Brown rice

3. There's something that vegans love that comes from a surprising source. Unfortunately, it's not very good for you. What is it? Hint

Strawberries
Marmite
Potato knishes
Aquafaba

4. If you're a vegan, you are probably looking for a good substitute for a particular dietary staple. You might find a good one made from soy, almonds, cashews or hazelnuts, rice, coconut or even hemp. What's the food that something made from one of these things can replace? Hint

Milk
Salad crutons
Bacon
Doughnuts

5. They're little and brown and when you grind them up they can become a tasty addition to vegan dishes. I thought they were just for making linen, but I was wrong. What are they? Hint

Chocolates
Flax seeds
Bird droppings
Brown lentils

6. Vegans are using a lot of foreign ingredients in cooking these days. Among the most popular are hummus and tahini. Where are these from? Hint

The Middle East
Brazil
Japan
Southern Ontario

7. Edamame, milk, tofu, animal feed, fake bacon, tamari, miso, tempeh... what are all these associated with? Hint

Nori
Chickpeas
Almonds
Soya

8. You're having a lovely evening. You start with a pint of Guinness and buffalo cauliflower wings, followed by fettuccine smothered in a traditional Alfredo sauce, washed down with a glass of dry champagne. For dessert you're having a bowl of lemon sorbet and slice of cake made from a mix. What's the only thing you eat or drink here that's definitely not vegan? Hint

The pasta
Alfredo sauce
The alcohol
The cake

9. Zinc is a tricky mineral. The body doesn't store it, so you have to consume some every day (8mg for women, 11 for men). Unfortunately for vegans, plants contain something called phylates which neutralize it. Pulses like chickpeas contain significant amounts of zinc, but they're plants. Which of these do you think will make them vegan-zinc friendly? Hint

Cook them
Make a salad with them
Mash them into a pulp
Leave them in the fridge for a month

10. In the 21st century there a plethora of products on the market that appeal to an all-vegan diet. These include cheese and other dairy substitutes, veggie meat concoctions, frozen meals, and a lot of crunchy, salted and fried snacks. This stuff sounds great! What's the problem? Hint

They are hard to find
They take a lot of time to prepare
They are unhealthy
They are hard to cook


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Which one of these people will not eat any animal products at all?

Answer: The vegan

The lacto ovo vegetarian will not consume meat or fish but will eat dairy and eggs. The pesco pollo vegetarian will eat chicken and fish. The pescatarian eats fish but no meat. The vegan eats no animal products at all, nor does a strict vegan wear anything of or from animals.

Further, raw vegans don't eat anything processed or cooked on high heat. There are also a few starch solution vegans, who get their carbs from starches rather than fruit. They disagree with the fruitarians, who only eat what drops from trees. Paleo vegans eat what our distant ancestors ate on a bad hunting day. I myself am a flexitarian, in that I've merely reduced my meat and animal product intake. And I'm not quite at the freegan stage, where I go hunting in the garbage for my supper.

For reasons of spirituality, environmentalism, health or body image (not to mention price), North Americans and Europeans started buying a lot less meat the beginning of the 21st century (Euromonitor International). At the same time, sales of pulses went up.
2. I'm making a salad for a vegan so I'll have to be careful to add all the nutrition I can. I've already got the spinach and tomatoes and veggies for iron and vitamins, but I think I need something with protein. What can I add?

Answer: Black lentils

Pulses in general are very high in protein and black lentils have the most of all, with 12 grams per 1/2 cup (100 grams). Most fruits and vegetables tend to be low in protein, with the exception of green peas, with 5 grams per 1/2 cup. Both are really nice in salad!

Brown rice and mushrooms are both really good for you, being high in minerals, vitamin D and fiber, but relatively low in protein.
3. There's something that vegans love that comes from a surprising source. Unfortunately, it's not very good for you. What is it?

Answer: Aquafaba

Aquafaba, the gloppy liquid in the can of chickpeas, is for many the miracle vegan ingredient in that it is a viable substitute for egg white. It whips up into meringue (after 10 or so minutes of whipping, mind you), and can be used in baking, making omelettes, ice cream, mayonnaise and even butter.

The problem with aquafaba is that it is not very healthy. If you're using it from a can, it may well be laced with chemicals and BPA, which is something that comes from the canning procedure. It also contains high amounts of oligosacchrides, which make you gassy and bilious. The high level of saponins in aquafaba is dangerous for red blood cell development among other things.

In short, stick to aquafaba for a nice lemon meringue pie every now and then but overuse is unwise. If you're pregnant, it's best to be on the safe side and avoid aquafaba altogether.

Marmite is, by the way, vegan-friendly.
4. If you're a vegan, you are probably looking for a good substitute for a particular dietary staple. You might find a good one made from soy, almonds, cashews or hazelnuts, rice, coconut or even hemp. What's the food that something made from one of these things can replace?

Answer: Milk

Milk and dairy products are high in protein and especially important for vegans, calcium. Of the many milk substitutes on the market, the winner is soy milk, with 7 grams of protein per cup (250 ml). Most soy milks are fortified with calcium, but please check the label before buying. Paleo vegans are keen on the nut milks which are lower in protein but taste nicer. Rice and hemp milk are also generally fortified, but may contain sugar.
5. They're little and brown and when you grind them up they can become a tasty addition to vegan dishes. I thought they were just for making linen, but I was wrong. What are they?

Answer: Flax seeds

Flax seeds, either whole, ground or made into oil, are a pretty terrific addition to anyone's diet and especially important for vegans in that they are high in Omega 3 fatty acids, which are hard to find elsewhere. They are also high in fiber, protein, minerals and something called lignans, which they've got more of than any other food. Lignans may deter cancer. Flax seeds are also good for constipation and bowel disorders and great for lowering cholesterol.

Apparently, people have been using these seeds as medicine for thousands of years. Like most 'miracle' foods, however, it's possible to overdo. Using too much of them can cause stomach and bowel upsets and diarrhea. One to two tablespoons daily is recommended.

Flax seeds can be added to smoothies, breakfast cereals, soups and stews. The oil can be used for salad dressing (although not cooking, as high heat leaches out the health benefits). When boiled and reduced, the gel can be whipped into meringue (allow at least 15 minutes), a possible alternative to aquafaba if you've got an electric mixer.
6. Vegans are using a lot of foreign ingredients in cooking these days. Among the most popular are hummus and tahini. Where are these from?

Answer: The Middle East

When I started cooking vegan for my friend my first instinct was to adapt dishes I was familiar with and I must say, I can make a great chili with sweet potato. Later on I started looking at recipes and ingredients from cultures where meat is not the main event for every meal. That's how I came upon hummus and tahini. They're essentials when eating falafel, but there's more to them.

Both are staples of the Middle Eastern diet. Tahini is a dressing made from ground sesame seeds and hummus is a paste made from ground chickpeas and tahini. I can get hummus in my supermarket in a range of exotic flavors ranging from traditional garlic to jalapeno or sriracha. Hummus can be used as a spread, a dip or even as a great addition to soup. Tahini makes a lovely salad dressing and can be whipped up into a good yogurt substitute.

Both hummus and tahini pack a nutritional punch although I'm warned that processed hummus has most of the good stuff leached out of it. Other vegan friendly middle eastern specialties include babaganoush (eggplant dip/spread) and couscous (vegetables, spices and couscous grains).
7. Edamame, milk, tofu, animal feed, fake bacon, tamari, miso, tempeh... what are all these associated with?

Answer: Soya

Soya is the the plant product that has become a vegan and vegetarian staple. And rightly so, as it contains 16.6 grams of protein per 100 grams, as well as significant amounts of potassium, calcium and iron. You can steam the green pods (edamame) or eat it as tofu. Soya milk has become a viable alternative to dairy (if fortified). Asians use it in sauces (tamari, soy sauce), and in fermented form as miso and tempeh. Commercial products such as soy bacon bits and desiccated soy 'meat' are on the market as well.

Tofu is a particularly versatile food product. In firm form it can be baked, fried, shredded in salad or marinated. Silken tofu can be added to soups and smoothies and 1/4 cup (32 g) will make a good substitute for one egg in baking.

There are some potential drawbacks to soya. Quite a few people are allergic to it and there has been a lot made of it's being basically unhealthy. In 2018 'Good Housekeeping' published an article that countered this.

'Eating plant-based foods in their closest-to-nature (a.k.a. least processed) form? Super nutritious. But taking supplements made with the compounds in soybean? Not so much....it's not uncommon to see research reflecting consuming compounds in supplement form rather than eating the foods themselves. Those supplements are linked to increased disease risk, while real, whole foods are linked to decreased disease risk.
8. You're having a lovely evening. You start with a pint of Guinness and buffalo cauliflower wings, followed by fettuccine smothered in a traditional Alfredo sauce, washed down with a glass of dry champagne. For dessert you're having a bowl of lemon sorbet and slice of cake made from a mix. What's the only thing you eat or drink here that's definitely not vegan?

Answer: Alfredo sauce

Traditionally, Alfredo sauce is made with cream and therefore a vegan no-no, but otherwise this is a completely vegan meal!

The good news is that many commercial pasta products are 100% vegan. Fresh pastas may contain egg, but the dry variety contains no animal products at all. The buffalo cauliflower wings are tasty little vegan/vegetarian delights that show up on a lot of restaurant menus. Beware though, I just learned that sherbet and sorbet are different things. Sherbet contains dairy ingredients while sorbet is fruit ice. And yes, many cake mixes are incidentally or intentionally vegan (just be on the lookout for dairy-based ingredients). Use 1.5 cups or 355 ml soda water as egg substitute for a fluffy vegan delight.

Some wines and beers are vegan, others are not. They may use animal products such as isinglass and casein in their clarifying process. Best to check the net before you buy. And the good news is that in 2017 Guinness announced that vegans can drink a pint without a qualm!
9. Zinc is a tricky mineral. The body doesn't store it, so you have to consume some every day (8mg for women, 11 for men). Unfortunately for vegans, plants contain something called phylates which neutralize it. Pulses like chickpeas contain significant amounts of zinc, but they're plants. Which of these do you think will make them vegan-zinc friendly?

Answer: Cook them

A zinc deficiency is associated with immune deficiency, hair loss, growth retardation in children, slower healing and eye problems. Most vegans are aware that their diet has to be monitored for B12, calcium and protein, but fewer realize that zinc is equally important.

Meat and shellfish contain the most zinc, but significant amounts are contained in pulses. Yes, they do contain phylates, but the good news is that cooking and processing them significantly lowers the phylates while maintaining the zinc. Seeds, in particular flax and pumpkin seeds, also contain significant amounts of zinc.

My friend Ronit makes a delicious vegan cholent (lentil stew) that would fit the zinc-friendly criteria to a T!
10. In the 21st century there a plethora of products on the market that appeal to an all-vegan diet. These include cheese and other dairy substitutes, veggie meat concoctions, frozen meals, and a lot of crunchy, salted and fried snacks. This stuff sounds great! What's the problem?

Answer: They are unhealthy

Yes, it is possible to eat 100% vegan and get unhealthy and fat. Processed foods in general, be they vegan or not, tend to be high in sodium and sugar and low on nutrients. Although noshing a veggieburger slathered with vegan mayo and a side of vegan nachos is fun now and then, a successful vegan diet takes time.

Reading, checking product labels, counting nutrients, preparing everything yourself... is it really worth it? Is a vegan diet healthier? Studies point to lower cholesterol and blood pressure and animal rights organizations link veganism with a lot of health benefits (although they are more interested in veganism for environmental and animal welfare reasons than dietary ones). 'Psychology Today' warned in 2014 that studies on vegan health were often taken from samples containing a high number of wealthier, better educated people, who, they point out, probably exercise more and go to the doctor. In 2016 they published an article pointing out the creepy attraction vegan diets have for people with eating disorders.

Ok, it's not a quick fix, but going on a vegan diet for your health or going all-vegan for the world can be a lot of fun. Exploring new dishes, new foods, new cooking techniques and new tastes can open a whole new dimension in your diet. It's worth a look, at least!
Source: Author CSLwoman

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor WesleyCrusher before going online.
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