Quiz about Eureka  They Found Them
Quiz about Eureka  They Found Them

Eureka - They Found Them! Trivia Quiz


So many people, in the past, have used their scientific knowledge to create new things and we have inherited so many wonderful technological inventions. I have selected 10 of these which I find interesting. Do you know who invented them?

A multiple-choice quiz by Jomarion. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Author
Jomarion
Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
337,461
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
669
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. The date is 250 BC. As you take a stroll bordering a river bank in Sicily, you notice that there is a long, cylindrical object lying against the bank, with one end in the water. A man is turning a handle on the top of this contraption. He tells you that there is a large screw inside the cylinder which raises water from the river to the field above, when he turns the handle. You realise that you are looking at a screw pump - a method of irrigation which was becoming very popular at that time.
Who allegedly invented this method of raising water?
Hint

Aeschylus
Archimedes
Epicurus
Plutarch

2. In the early 18th century, coal was becoming increasingly important in British industry. Mine shafts had to be sunk ever more deeply to reach rich, lower seams of coal. This meant that there was more risk of water flooding the underground tunnels. A certain blacksmith and his assistant, John Calley, created a very effective, steam-powered pump which was so successful that it was used in hundreds of mines in Britain and abroad.
Who was this blacksmith?
Hint

James Watt
Thomas Savery
Matthew Boulton
Thomas Newcomen

3. In 1752 in America, a man sent a kite up into the air with a sharp-pointed piece of metal attached to it during a thunderstorm. In doing so, he invented the lightning conductor. Who was this man? Hint

Thomas Edison
Alexander Graham Bell
Benjamin Franklin
Frankenstein

4. On 4th June 1783, in a field near Annonay, in the Ardèche (France), a crowd of invited dignitaries were gasping in astonishment as they stared upwards at a huge, ascending envelope of hot air. They were watching the first, public, lighter-than-air flight.
Who were the two brothers who made this possible?
Hint

Wilbur and Orville Wright
Heinz and Ferdinand von Zeppelin
Louis and Francis Bleriot
Joseph and Etienne Montgolfier

5. Towards the end of the 18th century, on a cotton plantation in the USA, a man watched slaves handling the harvested cotton bolls as they laboriously separated the fibres from the seeds, by hand. After some thought, he came up with the idea of making a perforated cylinder containing rows of teeth which would be rotated inside the tube by a handle. When cotton bolls were put into the cylinder, the fibres clung to the rotating teeth and were pulled through slits in a piece of wood whilst the unwanted seeds fell through the hole in the cylinder. The cotton gin was born. Who was this man? Hint

Jeremy Smith
Russell Bourne
Eli Whitney
Phineas Miller

6. In 1800, in Como (Italy), a man was interested in the electrical interaction of metals submerged near to each other in an acidic solution. He placed a series of copper and zinc rings in an acid solution, known as an electrolyte, and thus gave the world its first battery. Can you find his name in the following list? Hint

Humphrey Davey
Michael Faraday
Luigi Galvani
Alessandro Volta

7. There are many wonderful exhibits to be seen in The Science Museum in London (England). One of them which always attracts an interested crowd is an early railway locomotive called 'The Rocket'. It was built in the early 19th century in Newcastle upon Tyne and was designed for The Rainhill Trials, held by The Liverpool and Manchester Railway Company. They needed to find the best locomotive for a new line between these two cities. The Rocket won easily, reaching a speed of 24 mph during the 20 laps of the course.
Who was the man who, with the help of his father, George, and also Henry Booth who gave advice on the boiler, is given credit for the design of this special, winning locomotive?
Hint

Richard Trevithick
Thomas Newcomen
James Watt
Robert Stephenson

8. 'Lady Liberty' stands on an island in New York harbour lifting her torch to the sky. In 1886 she was a gift to the people of America from France. It was a sculptor who was asked to make this stupendous statue, in 1871, but it was an engineer who, using all the technology available to him, decided how 'Lady Liberty' should be internally supported. He designed a metal pylon which would support the external, copper plates fixed to it. Who was this clever Frenchman who thought of this internal skeleton? Hint

Frederic Auguste Bartholdi
Ferdinand de Lesseps
Gustave Eiffel
Maurice Koechlin

9. In the 1920s, driving along foggy, country roads in Yorkshire, England, a certain man became increasingly aware of the hazards to motorists. Frequently he was unable to see the centre or the side of the road so he invented 'cats' eyes'. He thought of embedding small, reflecting beads, facing in opposite directions, in flexible rubber. He sunk both beads and rubber into small, cast-iron containers.
Having perfected the idea, he patented the 'cats' eyes' in 1934. In 1947 they were introduced on British roads - being buried in lines to mark the centres.
Who was this inventor?
Hint

Percy Thomas
Percy Jones
Percy Elliott
Percy Shaw

10. During the night of the 16-17th May, 1943, aircraft of 617 Squadron of the Royal Air Force were maintaining a speed of 240-250 mph at a height of 60 feet above the water as they flew towards the Moehne, Eder and Sorpe Dams in Germany. They were carrying very unusual bombs which, when released, went bouncing and re-bouncing towards the dams, to breach them.
Who was the designer of this bouncing bomb?
Hint

Hugh Montague Trenchard
Barnes Wallis
Christopher Cockerell
Arthur Harris


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The date is 250 BC. As you take a stroll bordering a river bank in Sicily, you notice that there is a long, cylindrical object lying against the bank, with one end in the water. A man is turning a handle on the top of this contraption. He tells you that there is a large screw inside the cylinder which raises water from the river to the field above, when he turns the handle. You realise that you are looking at a screw pump - a method of irrigation which was becoming very popular at that time. Who allegedly invented this method of raising water?

Answer: Archimedes

This screw pump is more commonly known as The Archimedes' Screw. You can still see them in use today in waste-water treatment plants where each helix rotates in a reclined, open trough to pump sewage. This screw-type design prevents clogging.
The same principle is used to drain flooded areas and also in some high-speed tools.
2. In the early 18th century, coal was becoming increasingly important in British industry. Mine shafts had to be sunk ever more deeply to reach rich, lower seams of coal. This meant that there was more risk of water flooding the underground tunnels. A certain blacksmith and his assistant, John Calley, created a very effective, steam-powered pump which was so successful that it was used in hundreds of mines in Britain and abroad. Who was this blacksmith?

Answer: Thomas Newcomen

This invention is sometimes thought of as a steam engine but it was really an atmospheric, pressure pump. James Watt improved on Newcomen's work by creating a separate condenser thus producing a faster, more efficient engine.
3. In 1752 in America, a man sent a kite up into the air with a sharp-pointed piece of metal attached to it during a thunderstorm. In doing so, he invented the lightning conductor. Who was this man?

Answer: Benjamin Franklin

Both Bell and Edison were born almost a century and a half later than Franklin, so the latter was really breaking new ground in the field of electricity. Frankenstein (as most of us know) was a figment of Mary Shelley's imagination. He, too, used the power of an electrical storm - to bring life to his monstrous creation.

As most people know, lightning conductors should be made with a high point from which copper wire or cables should run down, in a direct line to earth. Sharp bends and points should be avoided and they should be held at a distance of at least 2" away from house walls. They should be connected to a water main or copper earth plates buried in damp soil.
4. On 4th June 1783, in a field near Annonay, in the Ardèche (France), a crowd of invited dignitaries were gasping in astonishment as they stared upwards at a huge, ascending envelope of hot air. They were watching the first, public, lighter-than-air flight. Who were the two brothers who made this possible?

Answer: Joseph and Etienne Montgolfier

It is said that Joseph got the idea for this type of flight whilst watching his mother's washing drying in front of the fire. He noticed that the hot air made the draperies billow upwards.

Later in the same year, in the grounds of the Chateau of Versailles, the King and Marie Antoinette witnessed the flight of a sheep, a cockerel and a duck in a hot-air balloon. Because the animals came to no harm, the King gave permission for a manned flight. It was on the 21st of November that Pilatre de Rozier became the first man to fly.
5. Towards the end of the 18th century, on a cotton plantation in the USA, a man watched slaves handling the harvested cotton bolls as they laboriously separated the fibres from the seeds, by hand. After some thought, he came up with the idea of making a perforated cylinder containing rows of teeth which would be rotated inside the tube by a handle. When cotton bolls were put into the cylinder, the fibres clung to the rotating teeth and were pulled through slits in a piece of wood whilst the unwanted seeds fell through the hole in the cylinder. The cotton gin was born. Who was this man?

Answer: Eli Whitney

This machine made it possible to clean 50 times more cotton than by hand. It helped in the fight against slavery by reducing the number of slaves needed. It had a huge impact on agriculture. In the 1790s approximately 180,000 pounds was harvested, per year, in the USA and a decade later, the enormous quantity of 93 million pounds was produced.
At first animals, such as donkeys and horses, were used to turn the gin and later James Watts' steam engine was adapted to drive the machine - leading to even more cotton production and greater profits.
6. In 1800, in Como (Italy), a man was interested in the electrical interaction of metals submerged near to each other in an acidic solution. He placed a series of copper and zinc rings in an acid solution, known as an electrolyte, and thus gave the world its first battery. Can you find his name in the following list?

Answer: Alessandro Volta

What he did established the basis for nearly all modern batteries.
After he had demonstrated his 'voltaic cell' to Napoleon Bonaparte in 1801, he was ennobled and given the title of Count.
7. There are many wonderful exhibits to be seen in The Science Museum in London (England). One of them which always attracts an interested crowd is an early railway locomotive called 'The Rocket'. It was built in the early 19th century in Newcastle upon Tyne and was designed for The Rainhill Trials, held by The Liverpool and Manchester Railway Company. They needed to find the best locomotive for a new line between these two cities. The Rocket won easily, reaching a speed of 24 mph during the 20 laps of the course. Who was the man who, with the help of his father, George, and also Henry Booth who gave advice on the boiler, is given credit for the design of this special, winning locomotive?

Answer: Robert Stephenson

This was the first locomotive to have a multi-tube boiler instead of a single or twin flue. The Rocket was able to go faster than its rivals because the boiler was more powerful.
In 1923 Buster Keaton had a functioning replica built for the film 'Our Hospitality'. It was used again in the film 'The Iron Mule' but what happened to it after that is unknown.
8. 'Lady Liberty' stands on an island in New York harbour lifting her torch to the sky. In 1886 she was a gift to the people of America from France. It was a sculptor who was asked to make this stupendous statue, in 1871, but it was an engineer who, using all the technology available to him, decided how 'Lady Liberty' should be internally supported. He designed a metal pylon which would support the external, copper plates fixed to it. Who was this clever Frenchman who thought of this internal skeleton?

Answer: Gustave Eiffel

The pylon served as the main, strong support for the statue and also carried a shaped metal skeleton to which the 'skin' (copper plates) of the exterior would be attached. They had to be fastened on firmly, but loosely enough for the whole structure to bend slightly in the wind and also to allow for metal expansion in the heat of the Summer.
The torch was modified for electricity in 1916.
The statue was repaired in the mid 1980s by both French and Americans so that it would be in perfect condition for the 1986 Centennial Celebrations.
9. In the 1920s, driving along foggy, country roads in Yorkshire, England, a certain man became increasingly aware of the hazards to motorists. Frequently he was unable to see the centre or the side of the road so he invented 'cats' eyes'. He thought of embedding small, reflecting beads, facing in opposite directions, in flexible rubber. He sunk both beads and rubber into small, cast-iron containers. Having perfected the idea, he patented the 'cats' eyes' in 1934. In 1947 they were introduced on British roads - being buried in lines to mark the centres. Who was this inventor?

Answer: Percy Shaw

Many people say that Percy Shaw was inspired by the reflection of his car's headlights in the eyes of a cat. Whether that is the truth or not, it is certainly true that his invention became widely known as 'Cats' Eyes'.
I have driven many miles at night in Britain and blessed these sparkling, little 'eyes' marking the centre of the road - as have thousands like me. I feel sure that many accidents have been prevented because of this wonderful invention.
10. During the night of the 16-17th May, 1943, aircraft of 617 Squadron of the Royal Air Force were maintaining a speed of 240-250 mph at a height of 60 feet above the water as they flew towards the Moehne, Eder and Sorpe Dams in Germany. They were carrying very unusual bombs which, when released, went bouncing and re-bouncing towards the dams, to breach them. Who was the designer of this bouncing bomb?

Answer: Barnes Wallis

Before being released from specially-designed aircraft, the bombs were held and rotated in V-shaped arms under the 'planes. They hit the water with some backspin and were designed to bounce low-down against the dams' walls and roll down under the water to rest at the feet of the structures.

When a time fuse set the bombs off, the pressure of the water would drive the force of the explosion hard against the walls with a crushing effect. A normal raid, from high in the air, would require an enormous quantity of bombs to breach the dams and the water would have a cushioning effect - sending much of the explosive force away from the dams' walls. (The Moehne and Eder dams were breached, but the much newer Sorpe dam sustained only minor damage).
Source: Author Jomarion

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