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Quiz about Is That Your Final Answer
Quiz about Is That Your Final Answer

"Is That Your Final Answer?" Trivia Quiz


So went Regis Philbin's catchphrase on "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" on ABC. Can you recognize these EARLIER emcees and announcers and their catchphrases from American TV (1960s-80s)? Do you even know what 'emcee' means? Are you a TRUE game show geek?

A multiple-choice quiz by gracious1. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
gracious1
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
359,240
Updated
Jun 15 23
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
681
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. This game show host began as a panelist on "Match Game" and then hosted his own show. After listening to the response of a contestant (and offering her a kiss if she were of the female persuasion), he would turn to a giant board of lightbulbs and flipboards and shout aimlessly in the air (as if to a deity) "Our survey said...!" Many emcees have used it since, but who originated this phrase? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. "On your Mark, let's start, the Family Feud!"

At the beginning of "Family Feud" in its original incarnation, the announcer would introduce the feuding families, and then conclude with the above phrase. Who was the announcer who said these words for nearly a decade?
Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. "Come on down! You're the next contestant on 'The Price Is Right'!"

All of the men listed below have had the privilege of shouting this phrase that conjures up excitement like no other game show catchphrase in America. But which fellow got to do it first?
Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. "This... is... 'Jeopardy!'"

Who famously began the long-running syndicated version of "Jeopardy!" with those words for more than a quarter of a century?
Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Who announced for "Jeopardy!" during its first incarnation (1964-75), and appeared in the Weird Al parody video, "I Lost on 'Jeopardy' (Baby)" in 1983?
Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. "It's more than 'Password'; it's 'Password Plus'!"

This 1979 revival of the "Password" game had several announcers, and ultimately a few emcees. Who served as the emcee for the original "Password" and for the first season of "Password Plus" before his untimely death?
Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. "Not a match; the board goes back."

Sometimes when a joke fell flat, David Letterman would say this one-liner on his late-night program. But what game show host said it first?
Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Who narrated "Let's Make a Deal" and served as second banana to Monty Hall during the show's run from 1964 to 1977, and almost got the job of announcing for "Jeopardy!"? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. "Joker... Joker... JOKER!!!"

What master of ceremonies, part of the quiz show scandals of the 1950s, shouted this phrase merrily on "The Joker's Wild" from 1972 to 1984 whenever three jokers appeared on the giant slot machine?
Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Gene Rayburn hosted and Johnny Olson announced for the zany panel show "Match Game" (1973-82). During their tenure a number of catchphrases became associated with this popular and titillating program. Which was NOT one of them? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
May 26 2024 : Guest 24: 7/10
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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This game show host began as a panelist on "Match Game" and then hosted his own show. After listening to the response of a contestant (and offering her a kiss if she were of the female persuasion), he would turn to a giant board of lightbulbs and flipboards and shout aimlessly in the air (as if to a deity) "Our survey said...!" Many emcees have used it since, but who originated this phrase?

Answer: Richard Dawson

"Family Feud" has been on the air in one incarnation or another in the USA since 1976. Since the original "Family Feud" (1976-85), the phrase has become corrupted slightly to "Survey says!" In fact, "Survey says!" has become a cultural meme, with a life of its own, used even in newspaper headlines (such as, "Survey says: Americans felt more secure in jobs in 2012").

Born Colin Lionel Emm in Gosport, Hampshire, England, Dawson became famous in the States playing Corporal Peter Newkirk in "Hogan's Heroes" (1965-71). Whilst as a panelist on "Match Game" from 1973 to 1978, Richard Dawson was the contestants' favorite celebrity. He returned to "Family Feud" in 1994-95, and he starred as a parody of himself in "The Running Man" (1987) with Arnold Schwarzenegger. He died of esophageal cancer in 2012.
2. "On your Mark, let's start, the Family Feud!" At the beginning of "Family Feud" in its original incarnation, the announcer would introduce the feuding families, and then conclude with the above phrase. Who was the announcer who said these words for nearly a decade?

Answer: Gene Wood

Eugene Edward "Gene" Wood (1925-2004) began his career writing for "Captain Kangaroo". His first announcing job was on "Supermarket Sweep" in 1966. In the early 1970s he served as game show host for "Beat the Clock" and for "Anything You Can Do". By the 1976, he was announcing for most of the Goodson-Todman game shows on American TV. On the original "Card Sharks" (1978-81), he would begin each program by reading a verse, which would inevitably end with the words "...on Card Sharks". On "Family Feud" Wood would warm up the audience, and emcee Richard Dawson would often use him as a straight man for his jokes, which would give Wood considerable screen time.

The chemistry between the two of them was apparent, and Gene Wood would sometimes act like a lackey for laughs. Gene Wood died of lung cancer on 21 May 2004.
3. "Come on down! You're the next contestant on 'The Price Is Right'!" All of the men listed below have had the privilege of shouting this phrase that conjures up excitement like no other game show catchphrase in America. But which fellow got to do it first?

Answer: Johnny Olson

John Leonard "Johnny" Olson (1910-1985) was born in Minnesota and worked most of his life in radio and television. He had announced a great many Goodson-Todman productions before he appeared on the revival of "The Price is Right"-- including "Name That Tune", "To Tell the Truth", and "Match Game". "The Price Is Right", however, catapulted Olson to fame, and in fact "Come on down!" was his creation. He worked on "The Price Is Right" from its inception in 1972 until his death in 1985, and he had more camera-time that most announcers did at that time. He also warmed up the audience before taping, and sometimes he would appear in the Showcases in the final game of the show. His death from a cerebral hemorrhage was unexpected, and taped episodes with his appearance continued to air for a month after his death.

All of the other gentlemen listed as answer choices were also announcers for "The Price Is Right": Rod Roddy from 1986 to 2003, Rich Fields from 2004 to 2010, and George Gray since 2011.
4. "This... is... 'Jeopardy!'" Who famously began the long-running syndicated version of "Jeopardy!" with those words for more than a quarter of a century?

Answer: Johnny Gilbert

Virginia-born John L. "Johnny" Gilbert III (b. 1924) started out singing in nightclubs, but he began announcing for gameshows in New York back in the 1950s. Gilbert has done the voice-overs for "Jeopardy!" since the show debuted in 1984. His announcing credits are numerous: "The $25,000 Pyramid", "The $100,000 Pyramid", "Tic-Tac-Dough", "Win, Lose, or Draw", and "Circus of the Stars" to name but a few.

He has also guest-announced on "Jeopardy!'s" sister show, "Wheel of Fortune" and served as its interim announcer following the unexpected death of Charlie O'Donnell in 2010.
5. Who announced for "Jeopardy!" during its first incarnation (1964-75), and appeared in the Weird Al parody video, "I Lost on 'Jeopardy' (Baby)" in 1983?

Answer: Don Pardo

Dominick George "Don" Pardo graced the Earth in 1918 in Westfield, Massachusetts and held a long career in broadcasting. In radio, he began announcing at WJAR-AM in Providence, Rhode Island in 1938. During World War II he was a war reporter for NBC Radio.

In 1956 he became the first announcer for the original incarnation of "The Price is Right", until ABC took over in 1963. He began announcing for "Saturday Night Live" on its 1975 debut, and has held the job ever since, save for 1981-82. Although he retired to Tucson, Arizona, he flew in to New York once a week to do the show, until 2009, when he resumed pre-recording announcements (he briefly did so in 2006 as well). Don Pardo passed away on 28 August 2014, after a seven-decade career as an announcer.
6. "It's more than 'Password'; it's 'Password Plus'!" This 1979 revival of the "Password" game had several announcers, and ultimately a few emcees. Who served as the emcee for the original "Password" and for the first season of "Password Plus" before his untimely death?

Answer: Allen Ludden

All of the men listed served as host one time or another for "Password Plus", but Allen Ludden did it first, and he is the man who will forever be associated with that game. The Goodson-Todman production "Password" aired daily from 1961 to 1967 and was revived briefly from 1971 to 1975, will Allen Ludden as the host all that time. In 1979, "Password Plus" brought a new twist to the "Password" game -- a bonus round called Alphabetics, in which contestants had sixty seconds to guess ten passwords in alphabetical order. While Ludden had surgery in 1980, Bill Cullen substituted. Ludden returned briefly, but illness forced him to leave again, and he died in 1981.

Tom Kennedy took the reins after that. One day on the show, Kennedy's brother Jack Narz, himself a gameshow host, appeared as a celebrity guest, and on a lark offered to be master of ceremonies for the day. Kennedy agreed and the men switched places. A contestant objected and was later brought back for a second chance after she lost the game.
7. "Not a match; the board goes back." Sometimes when a joke fell flat, David Letterman would say this one-liner on his late-night program. But what game show host said it first?

Answer: Hugh Downs on "Concentration"

"Concentration" appeared in many iterations on NBC and was hosted by a number of well-known emcees, including Jack Barry, Ed McMahon, Jack Narz, and Alex Trebek. But during the original "Concentration" (1958-1969), Hugh Downs was the master of ceremonies. As in the children's memory game, contestants had to find matching cards on a board. Matches would be removed to reveal portions of a rebus, which the contestants would solve to win the game. When a contestant picked two cards that were not identical, Downs would say, "Not a match; the board goes back," as the cards flipped over again.

Born on St. Valentine's Day in Akron, Ohio in 1921, Hugh Downs presented not only game shows but also the news! He anchored "20/20", an ABC news-magazine program, from 1978 to 1999. In fact, his first job was reading the news on WBKB-TV (now WBBM-TV) in Chicago.
8. Who narrated "Let's Make a Deal" and served as second banana to Monty Hall during the show's run from 1964 to 1977, and almost got the job of announcing for "Jeopardy!"?

Answer: Jay Stewart

Born Jay Fix in 1918 in Summitville, Indiana, Jay Stewart got his first announcing jobs at radio stations WBOW in Terre Haute, Indiana, and WLW Radio in Chicago. On "Let's Make a Deal", Jay Stewart appeared on stage carrying prizes and props, and often modeled the Zonk prizes. (Announcer Jonathan Magnum carried on this tradition in the 21st-century "Deal" revival.) Monty Hall called Jay Stewart "the best second banana you ever found in your life," and reported "a very, very good feeling between us." Stewart announced for the pilot of Alex Trebek's "Jeopardy!" in 1983, but Johnny Gilbert won the gig.

In 1981 Jay Stewart's daughter Jamie took her own life. Afterward, Stewart was "born again" and appeared on "The 700 Club", and consequently found work doing voice-overs for Pat Roberston's Christian Broadcasting Network (now ABC Family). Stewart's newfound faith could not conquer the pain of his daughter's loss, however, and he likewise committed suicide in 1989.
9. "Joker... Joker... JOKER!!!" What master of ceremonies, part of the quiz show scandals of the 1950s, shouted this phrase merrily on "The Joker's Wild" from 1972 to 1984 whenever three jokers appeared on the giant slot machine?

Answer: Jack Barry

Jack Barry was born Jack Barasch in Lindenhurst, New York. He not only hosted "The Joker's Wild" but also created it. In 1958, Jack Barry and his partner Dan Enright were discovered feeding answers to contestants in their quiz show "Twenty-One", and producer Howard Felsher did likewise in another Barry-Enright creation, "Tic-Tac-Dough". "The Joker's Wild" was Barry's first successful production nationwide since the scandals. (Howard Felsher also recovered from the scandal to produce "Family Feud"). Because of "Joker's" success, Barry also revived "Tic-Tac-Dough", hosted by Wink Martindale.

Bill Cullen took over hosting duties after Jack Barry died of a heart attack in 1984. Pat Finn became the show's emcee in a short-lived revival (1990-91).
10. Gene Rayburn hosted and Johnny Olson announced for the zany panel show "Match Game" (1973-82). During their tenure a number of catchphrases became associated with this popular and titillating program. Which was NOT one of them?

Answer: "I'd like to solve the puzzle."

Johnny Olson would trumpet, "Get ready to match the stars!" as part of his opening narration. During one of the games that involved a sliding panel to reveal a word provided by the audience, Gene would often give the cue, "Slide it, Earl!" He was speaking to an African-American stagehand named Earl, whom Gene Rayburn once brought center stage for his fifteen minutes of fame. If contestants scored 0-0 during the first round of play, Rayburn would remark, "My, we have a real pitcher's duel going on here!" (In baseball, a pitcher's duel is a low-scoring game in which the pitchers allow very few runs, if any at all.)

And here is where game shows collide. On one episode of "Match Game", a contestant had to fill-in-the-blank for "COME ON _____". Johnny Olson was also the announcer for "The Price is Right", so Rayburn brought Olson on stage and had him read, "Come on down!" to wild cheers and applause.

"I'd like to solve the puzzle" is a catchphrase said by contestants in "Wheel of Fortune" and later, "Classic Concentration".
Source: Author gracious1

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor kyleisalive before going online.
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This quiz is part of series Commission #27:

You're not seeing double...but we're not making things any easier. For this Commission, launched in the Author's Lounge in March 2013, all participants received one or two titles, and each pair differed only slightly. Some wrote one, others wrote both.

  1. A Matter of Trust Very Easy
  2. A Matter of Time Tough
  3. They Broke Into Pieces Average
  4. I Could Have Had a R8 Average
  5. Why Me? Average
  6. Work It Out! Average
  7. Cut It Out! Easier
  8. Turn the Lights Out Average
  9. Burn the Lights Out Average
  10. Rise and Fall Easier
  11. The Old Gray Mare Average
  12. Please Accept or Refuse Now! Average

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