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Quiz about Google Maps Has No Dragons
Quiz about Google Maps Has No Dragons

Google Maps Has No Dragons Trivia Quiz

Ordering the Chinese Zodiac

Though superficially similar to the Western one, the Chinese zodiac has its own unique features, rooted in the philosophy and culture of that vast country. Can you put the list of Chinese zodiac animals into the correct order?

An ordering quiz by LadyNym. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
LadyNym
Time
3 mins
Type
Order Quiz
Quiz #
416,283
Updated
Apr 29 24
# Qns
12
Difficulty
Very Easy
Avg Score
11 / 12
Plays
265
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: mspurple54 (11/12), sue124012 (12/12), Guest 188 (9/12).
Mobile instructions: Press on an answer on the right. Then, press on the question it matches on the left.
(a) Drag-and-drop from the right to the left, or (b) click on a right side answer, and then click on its destination box to move it.
What's the Correct Order?Choices
1.   
(small )
Dragon
2.   
(strong)
Rooster
3.   
(fierce)
Goat
4.   
(prolific)
Snake
5.   
(fiery)
Rat
6.   
(slinky)
Horse
7.   
(fast)
Pig
8.   
(stubborn)
Tiger
9.   
(cheeky)
Rabbit
10.   
(proud)
Dog
11.   
(faithful)
Monkey
12.   
(lucky)
Ox





Most Recent Scores
Jul 19 2024 : mspurple54: 11/12
Jul 18 2024 : sue124012: 12/12
Jul 16 2024 : Guest 188: 9/12
Jul 11 2024 : mcdubb: 12/12
Jul 10 2024 : jmac5cicada: 9/12
Jul 09 2024 : GoodVibe: 10/12
Jul 08 2024 : drwinsac: 12/12
Jul 07 2024 : frozennugget: 10/12
Jul 06 2024 : Dorsetmaid: 12/12

Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Rat

The Rat (also referred to as Mouse: the Chinese word "shu" refers to various small rodents) is the first of the twelve animals in the Chinese zodiac ("shēngxio"). There are a number of legends regarding how the order of these animals was determined. In the best-known of these tales, the Jade Emperor (a representation of the primordial god of Chinese folk religion) organized a Great Race that involved crossing a wide river. The Rat came up first after hitching a ride on the Ox's back, then jumping across the finish line. In another legend, the Rat's scheming against the cat - who was eventually pushed out of the race - provides an explanation for the enmity between these two animals.

The Rat is associated with Zi, the first of the twelve Earthly Branches (an ordering system adopted in most of East Asia), the element of Water, Yang force, and the winter season. Its counterpart in the Western zodiac is Sagittarius. In modern Chinese astrology, people born in each of the twelve years are believed to possess some of the qualities traditionally attributed to each animal. People born in the Year of the Rat are said to be intelligent, sociable and ambitious; they can, however, be scheming and tight-fisted, as well as overly nervous. The Rat is most compatible with the Dragon, the Ox and the Monkey, while it does not get along with the Horse and the Rooster.
2. Ox

The Chinese word "ni" (commonly translated in the West as "ox") generally refers to various members of the bovine family, not necessarily male. Such animals have a prominent role in Chinese mythology, as well as everyday life. In one of the legends associated with the Chinese zodiac, the Ox was cheated of the first place in the twelve-year cycle by the Rat, who hitched a ride on the Ox's back when crossing a river, and then jumped off its back to finish first. According to another legend, the Ox was rewarded with the second place in the cycle for allowing the Rat to play the flute on his back. In the Vietnamese zodiac, which is almost identical to the Chinese one, the Ox is replaced by the Water Buffalo.

The Ox is associated with the Earthly Branch Chou, the element of Earth, Yin force, and the winter season. Its Western counterpart is Capricorn, another horned creature. People born in the Year of the Ox share some of the typical traits of the animal: they are patient, hardworking and trustworthy, but also prone to stubbornness and self-righteousness. The Ox is most compatible with the Snake, the Rat and the Rooster, while it does not get along with the Goat, the Tiger and the Horse.
3. Tiger

Called "hŭ" in Chinese, the Tiger is a powerful animal that is both admired and feared in Asia, where it has the role of "king of the jungle" attributed to the lion in Western culture. Indeed, the Chinese Tiger shares many of the traits of the Western sun sign of Leo; it also represented the power of the Emperor. The Tiger is also believed to have the power to chase away evil, and Tiger charms are used to ward off fire, theft and ghosts. In the legend of the Great Race, the Tiger came in third because he got exhausted by having to swim against the tide - but, once over the finish line, he boasted about having been able to make it in spite of everything.

The Tiger is associated with the Earthly Branch Yin, the element of Wood, Yang force, and the spring season. Its closest equivalent in the Western zodiac is Aquarius. It is most compatible with Horse, Dog, and Pig, while it does not get along with Ox, Snake and Monkey. People born in the Year of the Tiger are born leaders, with plenty of charisma and an innate zest for life; they can, however, be overconfident, domineering and short-tempered. The Tiger is most compatible with the Dragon, the Horse and the Dog, while it does not get along with the Ox, the Monkey and the Snake.
4. Rabbit

In Chinese culture, the small, apparently unassuming Rabbit ("t", also referred to as Hare) is regarded as the luckiest of the twelve zodiac animals. He is the animal that lives with the goddess Chang'e on the Moon, where it prepares the elixir of life. In the Vietnamese zodiac, the Rabbit is replaced by the Cat - possibly because the ancient Vietnamese word for rabbit, "mao", sounds like the Chinese word for cat (transliterated as "māo"). In the Great Race, the Rabbit was able to make it across the river by jumping from stone to stone, and then finding a log to complete the journey.

The Rabbit is associated with the Earthly Branch Măo, the element of Wood, Yin force, and the spring season. Its Western equivalent is the sign of Pisces. People born in the Year of the Rabbit are calm, sensitive and easygoing, and make excellent diplomats, artists and scholars. However, they also tend to be insecure, and easily discouraged or upset. The Rabbit is most compatible with the Goat, the Dog and the Pig, while it does not get along with the Rat and Rooster.
5. Dragon

The only mythical animal in the Chinese zodiac, the Dragon ("lng") is a powerful cultural symbol, sometimes identified with the country itself, which is referred to as "the Dragon". Indeed, in the past Chinese emperors were believed to have Dragon blood. Such is the iconic status of this creature - viewed in Asia as a bringer of prosperity and good luck - that in the countries that adopt the Chinese zodiac many people plan for their children to be born during the Year of the Dragon - leading to a spike in the birthrate. The Dragon's selfless nature is highlighted in the tale of the Great Race, where the majestic creature deployed his affinity with weather by creating rain during his flight to assuage humankind's thirst, and then helping the Rabbit come in ahead of him by blowing him across the river.

The Dragon is associated with the Earthly Branch Chen, the element of Earth, Yang force, and the spring season. Its Western counterpart is Aries. People born in the Year of the Dragon are naturally gifted and lucky, and possessed of a strong, charismatic personality - meaning they can also be overbearing and self-centred. They are natural leaders, who would make great heads of state - as well as artists, scientists and explorers. The Dragon is highly compatible with the Rat, the Rooster and the Monkey, while it does not get along with the Dog and the Rabbit.
6. Snake

The Snake ("sh") is closely related to the Dragon, and often referred to as the "little Dragon". In ancient China, the coiled snake symbolized the beginnings of the universe. As is the case of the Dragon, in many parts of Asia snakes are viewed in a positive light, unlike in the West. In the legend of the Great Race, the Snake hid in the Horse's hoof when crossing the river, and jumped out as the Horse was about to cross the finish line - thus ending in sixth place.

The Snake is associated with the Earthly Branch Si, the element of Fire, Yin force, and the summer season. Its Western counterpart is Taurus. People born in the Year of the Snake are wise and intuitive, with a keen appreciation for beauty and pleasurable things - which makes them successful artists. However, they tend to bear grudges and do not trust easily; they can also be duplicitous and are very good at hiding their feelings. The Snake is most compatible with the Rabbit, the Ox and the Rooster, while it does not get along with the Tiger and the Pig.
7. Horse

Cheated by the Snake, who scared him when he was about to cross the finish line, the Horse ("mă") finished seventh in the Great Race. Chinese mythology abounds in tales of horses with magical or divine characteristics - including flying dragon-horses ("longma"); the animal itself is a symbol of speed and strength, whose role in Chinese culture also reflect its importance for the peoples of Central and East Asia. A large number of magnificent depictions of horses was produced during the Tang dynasty (618-907).

The Horse is associated with the Earthly Branch Wu, the element of Fire, Yang force, and the summer season. Its western counterpart is Gemini. People born in the Year of the Horse are witty, outspoken, and extremely energetic (also in a sexual sense); they also have a strong need for freedom and independence. On the negative side, they tend to be impatient, impulsive and self-centred. The Horse is most compatible with the Tiger, the Goat and the Dog, and least compatible with the Ox and the Rooster.
8. Goat

The Goat ("yng") is sometimes referred to as the Sheep or Ram (often with regional differences), as the Chinese word denotes both goats and sheep, which are members of the same subfamily. In the legend of the Great Race, the Goat, the Monkey and the Rooster worked together as a team to cross the river and make it to the finish line. This is in keeping with the perceived nature of both sheep and goats, which are social animals and prefer to be part of a group rather than lead. Sheep and goats are regarded as auspicious animals in Chinese culture; the sign also occupies position number eight in the Chinese zodiac - a number regarded as particularly lucky.

The Goat is associated with the Earthly Branck Wi, the element of Earth, Yin force, and the summer season. Its Western counterpart is Cancer. People born in the Year of the Goat are kind, benevolent and peace-loving; they also tend to be very sensitive and are readily hurt by criticism or disapproval. They can also be lazy, gullible and disorganized. The Goat is most compatible with the Horse, the Rabbit and the Pig, while it does not get along with the Dragon and the Ox.
9. Monkey

In the legend of the Great Race, the Monkey ("hu") helped the Goat to clear the weeds from the raft found by the Rooster, and then carried it to the river. The three made it to the shore together, and the Monkey was given the ninth position in the Chinese zodiac. The number nine is regarded as an auspicious number because in Chinese it sounds like the word "everlasting". Monkeys also play a prominent role in Chinese literature. The Monkey King (Sun Wukong), a key figure in Chinese mythology, a kind of trickster superhero, is one of the main characters of the classic novel "Journey to the West".

The Monkey is associated with the Earthly Branch Shēn, the element of Metal, Yang force, and the autumn season. Its Western counterpart is Leo. People born in the Year of the Monkey are naturally curious and keenly intelligent, with supreme self-confidence and a wicked sense of humour. They are often the life of the party, and always ready for a challenge: however, they can also be self-centred, opportunistic, and unable to form strong attachments. The Monkey is highly compatible with the Rat and the Dragon, but does not get along with the Tiger and the Pig.
10. Rooster

In the legend of the Great Race, the Rooster ("jī") was part of a team with the Monkey and the Goat, and was the one who found the raft that would ferry them across the river. In China and other parts of East Asia, the Rooster is a symbol of the sun: cockfights were organized during festivals celebrating the arrival of spring. Roosters are also regarded as auspicious because the sound of their crowing resembles the Chinese words for "fame" and "merit".

The Rooster is associated with the Earthly Branch Yǒu, the element of Metal, Yin force, and the autumn season. Its Western counterpart is the sign of Virgo. People born in the Year of the Rooster are detail-oriented, witty and self-confident. Like the animal itself, they are proud of their appearance, and pay special attention to the way they dress. Ambitious and talented, they can also become controlling and overly concerned with themselves to the detriment of others. The Rooster is most compatible with the Ox, the Dragon and the Snake, but does not get along with the Rabbit, the Rat and the Dog - or (as happens in nature) with other Roosters.
11. Dog

The Dog ("gǒu ") is an important motif in Chinese mythology, and appears in folktales, literary works and historical accounts - often as a hero's faithful companion. In the legend of the Great Race, the Dog came in eleventh because of his love for water, which led him to spend time frolicking in the river rather than pressing on towards the finish line.

The Dog is associated with the Earthly Branch Xu, the element of Earth, Yang force, and the autumn season. Its Western counterpart is Libra. People born in the Year of the Dog, like the animals themselves, tend to be exuberant but loyal, helpful and protective. On the negative side, they can also be stubborn, bad-tempered and aggressive. The Dog is most compatible with the Tiger, the Horse and the Rabbit, as well as another Dog (not surprisingly, since dogs are social animals), but does not get along with the overproud Dragon and Rooster.
12. Pig

In Chinese culture, the Pig (also referred to as the Boar) stands for good luck, abundance and fertility. While in the West pigs are regarded as dirty, and often used as negative terms of comparison, in East Asia they are seen as noble, generous and intelligent. Such is the importance of pigs in Chinese life that the word for "home" is a pictograph of a roof with a pig beneath it. In the tale of the Great Race, the Pig came in last because he had fallen asleep after enjoying a large meal; in other legends, his considerable girth had slowed him down when crossing the river.

The pig is associated with the Earthly Branch Hai, Yin force, and the winter season; like the Rat, the first sign in the Zodiac, its element is Water. Its counterpart in the Western zodiac is Scorpio. People born in the Year of the Pig (which is simply referred to as "hai" by Chinese Muslim, as pigs are considered unclean in Islam) enjoy life to the fullest, and are optimistic and highly sociable. Their sensual nature, however, can cause them to overindulge in life's pleasures, and become too attached to material things. The Pig is most compatible with the Rabbit, the Goat and the Tiger, and least compatible with the Snake and the Monkey.
Source: Author LadyNym

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor Bruyere before going online.
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