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Quiz about Implausible Conversations at the Movies
Quiz about Implausible Conversations at the Movies

Implausible Conversations at the Movies Quiz


"Hey! Who's talking to who?" Well, truth is we don't know how these conversations ever got together in the first place. Take the two quotes (from different films) and figure out who's saying what to whom. All quotes [with minor tweaks] courtesy of IMDb!

A multiple-choice quiz by Gatsby722. Estimated time: 13 mins.
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Author
Gatsby722
Time
13 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
246,100
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Difficult
Avg Score
5 / 10
Plays
2054
Question 1 of 10
1. He: "If he loved you with all the power of his soul for a whole lifetime, he couldn't love you as much as I do in a single day." He huffed and puffed, convinced that he could turn this obsession into an eternity of bliss.
She: "We were attracted to each other at the party, that was obvious! You're on your own for the night, that's also obvious... we're two adults!" She replies, eyes notably glazed over and bearing a striking resemblance to a bunny caught in the headlights.
...The music swells in the backround, the air is just heavy with drama. It looks like somebody's about to go walking off into the sunset with somebody. I wonder if that setting sun is ready for this over-the-top pair?
Who might these two be?
Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. One guy: "You ever get the feelin'... I don't know, er... when you're in town and someone looks at you all suspicious, like he knows? And then you go out on the pavement and everyone looks like they know too?" He muses as he gazes warily into the night sky.
Other guy: [sighing audibly] "My, we seem to be a little short on brotherly love 'round here..." His eyes twinkle as he looks the other way.
Harmonicas play sweet and lonely tunes in the distance, the wind whistles and the moon is bright. The director quickly (and I mean quickly) yells "Cut!"
Who are the two fellows in this imaginary scene?
Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Well dressed gentleman: "The important thing is the rhythm. Always have rhythm in your shaking. Now a Manhattan you shake to fox-trot time, a Bronx to two-step time, a dry martini you always shake to waltz time." He suggested, winking with a cavalier flair.
Weary-looking woman: [holding up the drink that has been poured for her and that she has just tasted] "Deeees is what they must make you to drink in Paradise...". She feels as if she might faint.
There is a cordial toast as she glimpses sadly out the window and he checks his coif in the mirror. Gunshots are heard outside; she shudders and he pays attention. The scene fades...
So...who are these two?
Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Flashy woman: "If they string me up, well, I'll know who brought the twine. That scummy, crummy, dummy hubby of mine!" She chortles, never quite ready to throw in the towel.
Not-so-flashy companion: "Dear Lord, We've come to the end of our journey, and in a little while we'll stand before you. I pray for you to be merciful. Judge us not for our weaknesses, but for our love and open the doors of heaven for us." She thumps her bible and hopes for the sanctity of forgiveness (or maybe just better odds for survival all around).
The director decides between shooting this exchange in black-and-white or color and opts for a double shot of gin instead, while he thinks it over. The two divas he's filming dash to the Hair and Make-Up department as he guzzles.
Can you tell me the two ladies who are talking just now?
Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Motive-driven man: "Here we have two great lovers from the past. Cleopatra Queen Of Egypt and Marc Antony, at their last meeting. You'll recall that Antony, believing Cleopatra to be dead, kills himself with his own sword. When Cleopatra discovers what has happened, she quickly follows her lover." He says, sounding somewhat seductive in an especially daunting way.
Intense woman: "Well I'm telling you, with 100 percent certainty that it is not the time. It's not about time, it's not the right time, it's not even quarter to the right time." She blows out the candle, eying him with tangible uncertainty.
Was he being romantic...foreboding...making a wise and intelligent comparison? The lady isn't a bit sure and even the director finds himself baffled!
Who are these two and what are they up to?
Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. First fellow, looking wistfully out upon the world he finds discouraging: "You find a glimmer of happiness in this world, there's always someone who wants to destroy it." He observes, reflecting on the cruelty that often comes with being a man.
The companion, blustery and upset about recent events: "He doesn't punish men for discipline. He likes to see men crawl." The other fellow snarls.
A fierce wind kicks up as the first man checks his watch and forces a smile. The other gentleman remains surly - he won't be good-natured in any short order and is about to liven up the turn(s) of events.
Can you name this unlikely pair of chums?
Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Adventurous fellow (with panache): "Madam, will you join me on the verandah? I understand they serve an outstanding lemon squash." He offers with all charm intact.
Complicated woman (with an arched eyebrow): "You know, I'm so glad I never got involved with you. I just would have ended up being some woman you had to get up out of bed and leave at 3:00 in the morning and go clean your andirons, and you don't even have a fireplace, not that I would know this." She spits, convinced there's more to this than lemons!
The dejected suitor sadly turns and walks to the west, somehow thinking they'd meet again. The tempestuous woman doesn't even know what lemon squash is but, in this case, doesn't want to have what the others might be having.
Who is this mismatched movie pair?
Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Wise-cracking and self-assured woman remarks: "You shoot off a guy's head with his pants down, believe me, Texas ain't the place you want to get caught." She warns, without even giving him a glance.
A pompous and less-than-predictable fellow blurts in response: "There's only one person in the world who's going to decide what I'm going to do and that's me!" He protests (but she ignores him nicely).
It's a rather noisy set, the scene muted by bangs and crashes and all manner of suspicious looking extras. The two stars have seats, stage left, and polish their Oscars.
Who would this couple be?
Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. First perplexed (but endearing) gentleman: "All my brothers and brothers-in-laws tell me what a good-hearted guy I am. You don't get to be good-hearted by accident. You get kicked around long enough, you become a professor of pain." He says, with ample self-pity but with the right field of dreams in mind.
Second perplexed (but endearing) gentleman: "I remember the staff at our public school. You know, we had a saying...uh...that those who can't do teach, and those who can't teach, teach gym. And, uh, those who couldn't do anything, I think, were assigned to our school." He's trying to keep on the subject but, as usual, drifting off into unrelated (yet reasonably thematic) territory.
The director is supposed to make it seem that there's hope for these two blokes in the same story. Whew! This might require a few dozen more takes!
Who are the two so-called "losers" in that scene?
Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. A man, looking a bit out-of-place: "I was just...uh...noticing that you're out of salami. I think you oughtta have somebody go over to the delicatessen, you know, bring some more back." He says this with the demeanor of a sort who is just chatting it up.
Woman with fire in her eyes (source of fire unknown): "Y'know, you got them bad eyes, like a gypsy, and I don't know why I didn't see it yesterday. Bad luck! That's what it is. Is that all I'm ever gonna have? I should have taken a rock and killed myself years ago!" She fumes, not in the mood to talk about salamis with anybody, thank you.
At this point the director just gives in to a nervous breakdown, since no sense can be made of this one. Puccini begins to play from the loud speaker and the relentless noise of the traffic outside just makes it worse!
Have you figured this scene out yet?
Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. He: "If he loved you with all the power of his soul for a whole lifetime, he couldn't love you as much as I do in a single day." He huffed and puffed, convinced that he could turn this obsession into an eternity of bliss. She: "We were attracted to each other at the party, that was obvious! You're on your own for the night, that's also obvious... we're two adults!" She replies, eyes notably glazed over and bearing a striking resemblance to a bunny caught in the headlights. ...The music swells in the backround, the air is just heavy with drama. It looks like somebody's about to go walking off into the sunset with somebody. I wonder if that setting sun is ready for this over-the-top pair? Who might these two be?

Answer: I think that Heathcliff ("Wuthering Heights") and Alex Forrest ("Fatal Attraction") would be kind of cute together!

Heathcliff says this in a total fervor, in regards to his ultimately fatal obsession with his never-to-be-had Cathy Earnshaw in "Wuthering Heights" (1939). It is doubtful in any context that he would attach such heartfelt emotion to the entirely psychotic, stalking, duplicitous (not to mention rabbit-cooking) Alex in 1987's "Fatal Attraction".

Her comment is directed to the philandering Dan, whom she's just met and whose life she will soon start making a living Hell on Earth (not that he didn't ask for trouble, I reckon, by messing with her to begin with). Laurence Olivier would, on his worst day, have had little or nothing to do with Glenn Close in an uproar...at least we can hope not?
2. One guy: "You ever get the feelin'... I don't know, er... when you're in town and someone looks at you all suspicious, like he knows? And then you go out on the pavement and everyone looks like they know too?" He muses as he gazes warily into the night sky. Other guy: [sighing audibly] "My, we seem to be a little short on brotherly love 'round here..." His eyes twinkle as he looks the other way. Harmonicas play sweet and lonely tunes in the distance, the wind whistles and the moon is bright. The director quickly (and I mean quickly) yells "Cut!" Who are the two fellows in this imaginary scene?

Answer: Are you telling me that Ennis Del Mar ("Brokeback Mountain") and Butch Cassidy ("Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid") were, um...pals? Perish the thought.

Heath Ledger and Paul Newman? Well, absolutely never - although it could be, and has been, said that Ennis from "Brokeback Mountain" (2004) and Butch ("Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" in 1969) were both involved in bigger-than-average friendships with their buddies. Ennis was mulling over the homosexual love affair with his best friend Jack Twist in "Brokeback". Cassidy? He was only looking for a little local hospitality as he attempted to make a clean getaway to Bolivia. We'll not discuss further persuasion(s) or design(s) beyond that, however.

It is doubtful the two quite different characters would have much more in common than cowboy hats and different versions of the same wild west, it's safe to say.
3. Well dressed gentleman: "The important thing is the rhythm. Always have rhythm in your shaking. Now a Manhattan you shake to fox-trot time, a Bronx to two-step time, a dry martini you always shake to waltz time." He suggested, winking with a cavalier flair. Weary-looking woman: [holding up the drink that has been poured for her and that she has just tasted] "Deeees is what they must make you to drink in Paradise...". She feels as if she might faint. There is a cordial toast as she glimpses sadly out the window and he checks his coif in the mirror. Gunshots are heard outside; she shudders and he pays attention. The scene fades... So...who are these two?

Answer: Sophie Zawitsowski ("Sophie's Choice") and Nick Charles ("The Thin Man")? Highly unlikely, I'd say.

Sophie's torturous past, notably the horror she endured in a concentration camp in 1982's "Sophie's Choice, is a distinctly far cry from the habitat of Mr. Charles. He, starting with "The Thin Man" (1934), is quite the sleuth, with his classy spouse Nora in a series of old films.

The characters, as played by Meryl Streep (talking here while enjoying an apertif as she struggles in bohemian NYC - unable to ever find that happiness that was stolen from her) and William Powell, dishing out his usual charming banter in this imaginary scene, would be a most confusing blend of tragedy and wit, though. No good would come of such a meeting as I described it.
4. Flashy woman: "If they string me up, well, I'll know who brought the twine. That scummy, crummy, dummy hubby of mine!" She chortles, never quite ready to throw in the towel. Not-so-flashy companion: "Dear Lord, We've come to the end of our journey, and in a little while we'll stand before you. I pray for you to be merciful. Judge us not for our weaknesses, but for our love and open the doors of heaven for us." She thumps her bible and hopes for the sanctity of forgiveness (or maybe just better odds for survival all around). The director decides between shooting this exchange in black-and-white or color and opts for a double shot of gin instead, while he thinks it over. The two divas he's filming dash to the Hair and Make-Up department as he guzzles. Can you tell me the two ladies who are talking just now?

Answer: Oh, to be a fly on the wall if Roxie Hart ("Chicago") and Rose Sayer ("The African Queen") ever meet! Delicious!

Rosie (or Kate Hepburn) is reasonably certain, more than once, that she and her scruffy skipper, Charlie Allnut, are to be killed pronto by the Nazis as they navigate that unfriendly river in 1951's "The African Queen". She prays a LOT in the movie and things work out in the end of it. Roxie Hart...well, she's not any missionary's cup of tea - she murders her on-the-side lover, makes a big production of getting away with it, wears skimpy clothes and dances around like a hooker on payday in 2002's "Chicago".

Her remark about it being her husband's fault (Renee Zellwegger sings that line, by the way) is uncalled for. Actually, her motives/sensibilities in general are shaky at best.
5. Motive-driven man: "Here we have two great lovers from the past. Cleopatra Queen Of Egypt and Marc Antony, at their last meeting. You'll recall that Antony, believing Cleopatra to be dead, kills himself with his own sword. When Cleopatra discovers what has happened, she quickly follows her lover." He says, sounding somewhat seductive in an especially daunting way. Intense woman: "Well I'm telling you, with 100 percent certainty that it is not the time. It's not about time, it's not the right time, it's not even quarter to the right time." She blows out the candle, eying him with tangible uncertainty. Was he being romantic...foreboding...making a wise and intelligent comparison? The lady isn't a bit sure and even the director finds himself baffled! Who are these two and what are they up to?

Answer: Professor Henry Jarrod ("House of Wax") might be wooing June Carter Cash ("Walk the Line") but I'd say it's time she got out of there in a hurry!

The impressive 2005 biopic of Johnny Cash, "Walk the Line", pays fine homage to the talented country/western singer and his equally talented and feisty life partner, June (Joaquin Phoenix and Reese Witherspoon act and sing their hearts out). Johnny is pestering his beloved June to marry him when she says the line about it not being the right time for such a move. "House of Wax" (1953) is fictional, thank heavens, and explores the rather gruesome sculpture created by a scarred (and nicely demented) artist, played to leering perfection by the unforgettable Vincent Price.

The odds of he and Miss Witherspoon finding a story line together that would generate good sense is, of course, impossible. And nobody wants to see such a pairing, anyway. It's too weird.
6. First fellow, looking wistfully out upon the world he finds discouraging: "You find a glimmer of happiness in this world, there's always someone who wants to destroy it." He observes, reflecting on the cruelty that often comes with being a man. The companion, blustery and upset about recent events: "He doesn't punish men for discipline. He likes to see men crawl." The other fellow snarls. A fierce wind kicks up as the first man checks his watch and forces a smile. The other gentleman remains surly - he won't be good-natured in any short order and is about to liven up the turn(s) of events. Can you name this unlikely pair of chums?

Answer: I'm sure that's Fletcher Christian ("Mutiny on the Bounty") gabbing with Sir James Matthew Barrie ("Finding Neverland")!

Would J.M. Barrie (who created the place called Neverland, where boys never have to worry about the complications involved with becoming men, and who made statements like the one mentioned here quite often, when contemplating such matters) have written "Peter Pan" after a boat ride with Fletcher - a spirited rascal who got fed up and not only stole the entire ship but cast its captain overboard? Doubtful, I suppose, since there is nothing too childlike about the frisky mutineer (and his quote here certainly indicates a thorough hatred for Captain Bligh, and he makes no bones about his feelings). Clark Gable plays him in 1932's "Mutiny on the Bounty" and he would have been in entire contrast to Johnny Depp's performance in 2001's "Neverland". All they really have in common is that both film characters are based on actual men. Oh, and that both actors involved are considered sex symbols, albeit generations apart.
7. Adventurous fellow (with panache): "Madam, will you join me on the verandah? I understand they serve an outstanding lemon squash." He offers with all charm intact. Complicated woman (with an arched eyebrow): "You know, I'm so glad I never got involved with you. I just would have ended up being some woman you had to get up out of bed and leave at 3:00 in the morning and go clean your andirons, and you don't even have a fireplace, not that I would know this." She spits, convinced there's more to this than lemons! The dejected suitor sadly turns and walks to the west, somehow thinking they'd meet again. The tempestuous woman doesn't even know what lemon squash is but, in this case, doesn't want to have what the others might be having. Who is this mismatched movie pair?

Answer: Phileas Fogg ("Around the World in Eighty Days") will need more than refreshments to impress the semi-fickle Sally Albright ("When Harry Met Sally").

Should this film ever become "real" it would certainly be a costly project at today's prices, not to mention crowded. "Around the World in Eighty Days" (1956) is an ambitious retelling of Jules Verne's novel about a dapper gent who goes, sensibly, around the world in less than three months! En route the movie introduces any number of notable stars in short appearances - in fact, this is where the term cameo roles originates.

The film also uses a total of 34,685 costumes in it, a record amount that has yet to be broken, as of late 2006. "When Harry Met Sally" (1989) is much smaller in scale but quite large on heart as two friends dare to take their friendship a few scary steps further. Billy Crystal and Meg Ryan are perfect for each other, too.

It is just that we audience members know it a good while before they do. And I have to say, from my perch of wild imaginings, I think that Miss Ryan and "Eighty Days"'s David Niven would make for a most camera-friendly duo!
8. Wise-cracking and self-assured woman remarks: "You shoot off a guy's head with his pants down, believe me, Texas ain't the place you want to get caught." She warns, without even giving him a glance. A pompous and less-than-predictable fellow blurts in response: "There's only one person in the world who's going to decide what I'm going to do and that's me!" He protests (but she ignores him nicely). It's a rather noisy set, the scene muted by bangs and crashes and all manner of suspicious looking extras. The two stars have seats, stage left, and polish their Oscars. Who would this couple be?

Answer: I feel certain that Louise Sawyer ("Thelma and Louise") could talk some sense into Charles Foster Kane ("Citizen Kane").

The quotes here are so representative of both characters that they could have likely been uttered often in either film, just not in the same film. Two renegade housewives are on the run and pulling off every crime that happens to cross their path in 1991's "Thelma and Louise" They would probably not spin right with the fiercely ambitious Mr. Kane from the 1941 film, although since he is a newspaper man he might have followed them around to get the story. Yes, it's unlikely - roughing it in Texas would NOT be Orson Welles' style. Welles did win an Oscar for "Kane", but only as a writer of the exceptional film.

It was rendered a timeless classic long after its release but was not so highly regarded in 1941. Sarandon grabbed her Oscar for "Dead Man Walking", of course, in 1996.
9. First perplexed (but endearing) gentleman: "All my brothers and brothers-in-laws tell me what a good-hearted guy I am. You don't get to be good-hearted by accident. You get kicked around long enough, you become a professor of pain." He says, with ample self-pity but with the right field of dreams in mind. Second perplexed (but endearing) gentleman: "I remember the staff at our public school. You know, we had a saying...uh...that those who can't do teach, and those who can't teach, teach gym. And, uh, those who couldn't do anything, I think, were assigned to our school." He's trying to keep on the subject but, as usual, drifting off into unrelated (yet reasonably thematic) territory. The director is supposed to make it seem that there's hope for these two blokes in the same story. Whew! This might require a few dozen more takes! Who are the two so-called "losers" in that scene?

Answer: Marty Pilletti ("Marty") would have more than a little in common with Alvy Singer ("Annie Hall"); I can see it.

In "Marty" (1955) the title character is the proverbial 'good son' who is fast becoming the irreversibly 'lonely middle-aged man' and is always saying things like this quote as he contemplates his unfortunate lot in life. Ernest Borgnine plays the flustered butcher brilliantly as a diamond-in-the-rough, and was given an Academy Award for his fine work. Woody Allen in "Annie Hall" is a totally different breed of outsider - neurotic beyond description but rightly enamored with the lovable free spirit, Annie, in 1977's masterpiece of contemporary angst. Alvy's statement is yet another of his observations that there is every reason available (if you probe long enough) as to why his life and overall attitude are a tad peculiar. I suspect he and Marty would have gotten along just fine.
10. A man, looking a bit out-of-place: "I was just...uh...noticing that you're out of salami. I think you oughtta have somebody go over to the delicatessen, you know, bring some more back." He says this with the demeanor of a sort who is just chatting it up. Woman with fire in her eyes (source of fire unknown): "Y'know, you got them bad eyes, like a gypsy, and I don't know why I didn't see it yesterday. Bad luck! That's what it is. Is that all I'm ever gonna have? I should have taken a rock and killed myself years ago!" She fumes, not in the mood to talk about salamis with anybody, thank you. At this point the director just gives in to a nervous breakdown, since no sense can be made of this one. Puccini begins to play from the loud speaker and the relentless noise of the traffic outside just makes it worse! Have you figured this scene out yet?

Answer: My gosh! Suspicious as he is I don't think Ratso Rizzo ("Midnight Cowboy") deserves Loretta Castorini's ("Moonstruck") wrath so loudly over cold cuts!

Hmmm...Ratso (Dustin Hoffman) IS shoplifting at the time he says this in 1969's "Midnight Cowboy". He isn't exactly an evil one, though, probably just hungry after all those sordid adventures, what with being homeless in NYC, with his odd cowboy/hustler friend Buck. As for Loretta...she's an operatic-like diva with an angelic (but somewhat devilish at the same time) face in 1988's "Moonstruck". She is engaged but is having a fling with her future brother-in-law - at whom she was screaming the aforementioned rant. Meanwhile, she's also dealing with a philandering father and sorting out a rather know-it-all mother. Perhaps we'd be a little testy, too? Cher certainly played it in the red zone!

I hope you found this quiz both slightly odd but mostly entertaining! Let's collectively go back to our seats now and enjoy the right people saying the right things in the right order in the right movies, shall we?
Source: Author Gatsby722

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor skunkee before going online.
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