FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about What Was That Musical Mistakes and Oddities
Quiz about What Was That Musical Mistakes and Oddities

What Was That?: Musical Mistakes and Oddities Quiz


Every artist must take steps to record their music. Sometimes they'll leave a microphone open during technical difficulties, or just blurt whatever pops into their head. The public gets stuck with the results. Enjoy this quiz on notable music bloopers.

A multiple-choice quiz by neon000. Estimated time: 8 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Music Trivia
  6. »
  7. Lyrics Mixture
  8. »
  9. Misheard Lyrics

Author
neon000
Time
8 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
251,211
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Very Difficult
Avg Score
4 / 10
Plays
2187
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. "Cough." There's laughter, then another person says, "That's going to be the one, eh, Pete?" There is also the sound of a plane going by overhead. What song is this? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. "Okay, Stephen, can we do that one again?"

This is from the end of a song. The lead singer apparently was not satisfied with the just-completed take of the recording. He mutters an impatient request to the producer. Looks like the singer didn't get his way, because the tune was left on the official release as-is. What song was it?
Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. "We've never recorded in the big leagues before." This claim to amateur technical skills was said a couple of times before the start of a song. The album went on to be a hit, so maybe the man shouldn't have been so nervous. What song was it? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. "I can't help it if I wasn't born with a cool name like Dickie." This is said by a guest singer brought in to support his friends in another group. The sidekick horses around while the band tunes up to start the track. What song was it? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. "Even though you're stupid, I still follow you..." This verbal fumble changed an entire song. The vocalist starts out sounding fairly normal. A few words in, however, something goes wrong, and the singer can't stop giggling. He goes through the verses in a singsong tone. The band never stops playing. What scrambled tune is this? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. This in-concert error had rather unpleasant consequences: it is believed to have contributed to the band's decision to break up in the early 1990s. The group is on stage, going through the song "Nimrod's Son," but then they grind to a halt. The lead singer announces that everything was fine "until Nimrod's daughter (messed) it up." Uh-oh. What band had this unfortunate downfall? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. This incident turned from a random glitch, to a deliberate prank that drove a band member nuts. At the start of the recording, the bassist and singer can be heard talking. Just at the point you think someone will begin to play, there's a long, defeaning 'beep' from the equipment. The singer starts over again. Again the white noise interrupts, and this time it lasts longer. So the singer gives it one more shot. Now the producer has figured out the problem...and repeats it deliberately. He sets off feedback at ever higher volumes, driving the singer completely crazy, so that the man screams obscenities and finally storms out. The bassist laughs his head off.

What group and song brought us this classic in-studio torture?
Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. The Sex Pistols once took a chance with a cover song. Singer John Lydon gamely tried to sing what he was given, but soon forgot most of the lyrics. Although the band kept playing in the background, John--continuing to sing to the beat--protested, "I don't know the *worrrrds.*" What song did he scuttle? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Toward the end of Depeche Mode's "Never Let Me Down Again," while David Gahan carries the lead vocals, Martin Gore contributes background singing--but with lines from a completely different song. What he sings is a slight alteration of that original: "See the stars are shining bright, everything's all right tonight." From what song did Gore borrow this? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. The Pixies opened one song with a bizarre comedic riff, with two people speaking. Kim Deal announces, in an exaggerated 'preppie' accent: "There were rumors he was into field hockey players." Then Frank Black cuts in, playing the part of the alleged miscreant himself. "So I applied, basically. I went out for the team." After that, as if nothing happened, the whole band kicks in on a regular song. What track was it? Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. "Cough." There's laughter, then another person says, "That's going to be the one, eh, Pete?" There is also the sound of a plane going by overhead. What song is this?

Answer: "In My Time of Dying," Led Zeppelin

This is from the double album "Physical Graffiti." The singer was, of course, Robert Plant, and the group's manager was Peter Grant.
2. "Okay, Stephen, can we do that one again?" This is from the end of a song. The lead singer apparently was not satisfied with the just-completed take of the recording. He mutters an impatient request to the producer. Looks like the singer didn't get his way, because the tune was left on the official release as-is. What song was it?

Answer: "I Started Something I Couldn't Finish," The Smiths

"Stephen" is Stephen Street. He produced the album "Strangeways, Here We Come," on which you can hear this track. The vocalist who asked for a retake, and never got it, is Morrissey.
3. "We've never recorded in the big leagues before." This claim to amateur technical skills was said a couple of times before the start of a song. The album went on to be a hit, so maybe the man shouldn't have been so nervous. What song was it?

Answer: "Crackbabies," Urge Overkill

Singer and guitarist Eddie "King" Roeser says it. The album, "Saturation," was propelled by the hit single "Sister Havana," making Urge Overkill 'big leagues' after all.
4. "I can't help it if I wasn't born with a cool name like Dickie." This is said by a guest singer brought in to support his friends in another group. The sidekick horses around while the band tunes up to start the track. What song was it?

Answer: "A Little Bit Ugly Now," The Mighty Mighty Bosstones

The person you hear is Jimmy Drescher of the band Murphy's Law. He's the guest vocalist for this track by the Mighty Mighty Bosstones. He's talking about his buddy, Dickie Barrett, lead vocalist of the Bosstones.

The album is the Bosstones' "Devil's Night Out."
5. "Even though you're stupid, I still follow you..." This verbal fumble changed an entire song. The vocalist starts out sounding fairly normal. A few words in, however, something goes wrong, and the singer can't stop giggling. He goes through the verses in a singsong tone. The band never stops playing. What scrambled tune is this?

Answer: "Every Little Counts," New Order

This song sounds for all the world like it should have been called "Every Second Counts," "Every Little Bit Counts," or something on that order.

Vocalist Bernard Sumner stars off as if everything's fine; then someone in the background interrupts with a noise, and he's done for. The studio gaffe was left on the last track of the album "Brotherhood."
6. This in-concert error had rather unpleasant consequences: it is believed to have contributed to the band's decision to break up in the early 1990s. The group is on stage, going through the song "Nimrod's Son," but then they grind to a halt. The lead singer announces that everything was fine "until Nimrod's daughter (messed) it up." Uh-oh. What band had this unfortunate downfall?

Answer: The Pixies

The singer was Frank Black, also known as Black Francis, and "Nimrod's daughter" his rebuke to bassist Kim Deal. Black claimed mistakes by Deal in playing and timing brought the song to a halt. ("Messed" is a euphemism for the word Frank actually said.)

Nevertheless, the concert aired intact on American radio stations in the early 1990s. Thankfully, in the 2000s, the Pixies reconciled with one another and went back on tour.
7. This incident turned from a random glitch, to a deliberate prank that drove a band member nuts. At the start of the recording, the bassist and singer can be heard talking. Just at the point you think someone will begin to play, there's a long, defeaning 'beep' from the equipment. The singer starts over again. Again the white noise interrupts, and this time it lasts longer. So the singer gives it one more shot. Now the producer has figured out the problem...and repeats it deliberately. He sets off feedback at ever higher volumes, driving the singer completely crazy, so that the man screams obscenities and finally storms out. The bassist laughs his head off. What group and song brought us this classic in-studio torture?

Answer: S. O. D., "What's That Noise?"

S.O.D. was a group featuring vocalist Billy Milano, along with Scott Ian from Anthrax. During a recording session, there was a feedback problem from the studio gear. Billy wanted to start singing anyway. The producer tried to fix the problem. When it didn't work, he thought he'd have fun with Billy, and made the audio glitch run deliberately.

He did it over and over, until poor Milano threw a fit and ran screaming out of the studio. Hey, what are friends for?
8. The Sex Pistols once took a chance with a cover song. Singer John Lydon gamely tried to sing what he was given, but soon forgot most of the lyrics. Although the band kept playing in the background, John--continuing to sing to the beat--protested, "I don't know the *worrrrds.*" What song did he scuttle?

Answer: "Roadrunner," Jonathan Richman and the Modern Lovers

This track sometimes pops up on rarities compilations. Bless his heart, John Lydon tried to sing over the memory lag, but the right words didn't come back to him in time.
9. Toward the end of Depeche Mode's "Never Let Me Down Again," while David Gahan carries the lead vocals, Martin Gore contributes background singing--but with lines from a completely different song. What he sings is a slight alteration of that original: "See the stars are shining bright, everything's all right tonight." From what song did Gore borrow this?

Answer: "Torch," Soft Cell

The original "Torch" has it: "See the stars coming out tonight / See the moon looking down tonight...Hear my words, they are dynamite." Depeche Mode were influenced by early electronic groups, and this was Martin's way of tipping the hat toward one of his inspirations.
10. The Pixies opened one song with a bizarre comedic riff, with two people speaking. Kim Deal announces, in an exaggerated 'preppie' accent: "There were rumors he was into field hockey players." Then Frank Black cuts in, playing the part of the alleged miscreant himself. "So I applied, basically. I went out for the team." After that, as if nothing happened, the whole band kicks in on a regular song. What track was it?

Answer: "I'm Amazed"

The song originally appeared on the album "Surfer Rosa." It was produced by Steve Albini.
Source: Author neon000

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor ertrum before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
3/4/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us