Quiz about An  AllTime Baseball Roster
Quiz about An  AllTime Baseball Roster

An All-Time Baseball Roster Trivia Quiz


My picks for American baseball's all-time team. See if you can spot these immortals from the descriptions given. Let the arguments begin!

A multiple-choice quiz by stuthehistoryguy. Estimated time: 9 mins.
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Time
9 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
276,726
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
15
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
11 / 15
Plays
5649
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: Guest 71 (12/15), Guest 107 (11/15), Guest 72 (15/15).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. My pick at first base is a relative consensus among baseball sachems. He batted .340 lifetime on the way to hitting 493 homers and driving in 1,990 runs. Though not brilliant defensively, he would eventually earn a decent reputation playing the bag while providing team leadership as Captain of the Yankees. Who is this all-time all-star? Hint

Keith Hernandez
Lou Gehrig
Hank Greenberg
Jimmie Foxx

2. At second base, I have perhaps the most obscure player here. He is perpetually underrated, possibly because he never won a batting title on the way to his .333 career batting average. Never the less, he amassed 3,315 hits and 744 stolen bases, as well as a sterling reputation for great defense and a longstanding record of 512 sacrifice hits that will probably never be broken because of changes in how the game is played. Who was this Columbia scholar turned dean of second basemen? Hint

Rogers Hornsby
Eddie Collins
Ryne Sandberg
Joe Morgan

3. My pick at third base was an all-around great at the position. In his eighteen seasons, he slammed 548 home runs (leading the league eight times) and snagged ten gold gloves. He was honored with three regular-season MVP awards and was World Series MVP in 1980. Who was this dominant player at the hot corner? Hint

Pie Traynor
George Brett
Mike Schmidt
Wade Boggs

4. I will not challenge conventional wisdom which has honored one man as the greatest shortstop in the history of the game for most of the last century. He won eight batting titles on the way to a lifetime average of .327, and was often said to be the greatest defensive talent of his age at ANY position he chose, only settling in at shortstop after six seasons of playing wherever he was needed on a particular day. Who is this charter member of the Hall of Fame at Cooperstown? Hint

Honus Wagner
Alex Rodriguez
Cal Ripken
Ernie Banks

5. In left field: this is the hardest question I have ever had to write. I am not a fan of my left fielder, and I am not the one to apologize for his actions, either apparent or proven. Never the less, he has broken major league career records for home runs and walks, stolen over 500 bases, and taken home eight gold gloves in left field en route to winning an unprecedented seven MVP awards. Who is this polarizing figure?

Answer: (First and Last names - or either one)
6. In center field, I'll take one of the most memorable players of his or any other day. This second-generation baseball star slammed 660 home runs, stole 338 bases (mostly in the 1950s, when the running game was sorely neglected) and took home twelve gold gloves to go with his two MVP awards and twenty-four All-Star Game selections. Who was this spectacular, multitalented giant of the game who made the most-rebroadcast catch in baseball history during the 1954 World Series? Hint

Joe DiMaggio
Mickey Mantle
Willie Mays
Ty Cobb

7. In right field, my pick needs neither introduction nor defense. His career stands with the reign of Caesar Augustus and the Florentine Renaissance among the noblest achievements of humanity. In several polls, he ranks with Abraham Lincoln and John Wayne among the most recognizable Americans. Who is this twentieth-century colossus who redefined the game en route to swatting 714 home runs, batting .342, and, defensively, boasting a throwing arm that allowed him to go 94-46 as a pitcher?

Answer: (Two words, or just surname)
8. Behind the plate, I will resist the temptation to pick Josh Gibson (who, in all honestly, probably would not have been a catcher in major league baseball) in favor of this man, a ten-time gold glove winner who slugged 45 and 40 home runs in his two MVP campaigns. Who was this Cincinnati Red whose manager refused to compare him to anyone else to save other catchers the embarrassment? Hint

Johnny Bench
Gary Carter
Yogi Berra
Mickey Cochrane

9. Though my personal philosophy ranks the idea of the designated hitter right up there with melba toast, I am overlooking my principles to include this great baseball man in this lineup. He batted .344 lifetime with a slugging average of .634. He didn't set any major records for career tallies, mostly because he was away from the game as a flight instructor in World War II and as John Glenn's wingman in the Korean Conflict. Who was this dedicated student of the game who literally wrote the book on modern batsmanship? Hint

Dave Kingman
Ted Williams
Tony Gwynn
Barry Bonds

10. I cannot really pile on the statistics about my starting right-handed pitcher because there are none - that I can rely on, anyway. For most of his career, he would alternate - sometimes day to day - between facing good, solid lineups and mowing down semipro squads thrown together for the honor of facing him. As such, he could claim feats like pitching fifty no-hitters and winning 2,000 lifetime games, albeit against decidedly sporadic opposition. Who was this astounding talent who was inducted into Cooperstown in 1971? Hint

Satchel Paige
Honus Wagner
Babe Ruth
Walter Johnson

11. My starting left-handed pitcher also lacks monster career statistics, albeit for entirely different reasons. For six years he toiled in obscurity for the Dodgers - first in his native Brooklyn, then in Los Angeles - posting records that can charitably be called mediocre. In 1961, he had an epiphany, emerging as the most overwhelming pitcher in the game. Over the next six seasons, he led the league in ERA five times, in strikeouts four times, and in wins three times on the way to winning three Cy Young awards, an MVP award (he finished second two other years), and three career World Series rings. Then, as quickly as he emerged, he was gone, retiring before his 31st birthday. Who was this man? Hint

Warren Spahn
Sandy Koufax
Bob Lemon
Whitey Ford

12. The relief ace is a relatively recent phenomenon in baseball history, and remains a rather liminal figure in the game - infinitely valued when it comes to finishing a close contest, but still carrying the onus of not playing anywhere close to the full nine innings. Indeed, a good case might be made that most of the great starting pitchers would have been better relievers than those who made their careers in the role. I am taking that tack in selecting my closer, an extraordinary fastballer who developed an effective curve and an occasional shocking forkball on his way to leading the American League in ERA an astounding nine times. Who was this dominant lefthander, who was also exemplary pitching in relief? Hint

Dizzy Dean
Christy Matthewson
Lefty Grove
Don Drysdale

13. For a utility player, my pick is an athlete whose accomplishments as an American figure often overshadow his play on the field. Baseball elder statistician Bill James' "Win Shares" defensive analysis places him among the top 10 second basemen for all who have played 5,000 innings at the position. It also places him as the best third basemen ever (in limited action there), and an elite corner outfielder whose statistics, compiled late in his career, place him among defensive luminaries like Al Kaline and Roberto Clemente. He also batted .311 lifetime, ran the bases like an All-American halfback (which he was), and picked up a Presidential Medal of Freedom in addition to about every other award available to a United States citizen. Who was this player whose Rookie of the Year campaign made front page headlines - and whose name that award now bears?

Answer: (first and last name, or just last name)
14. For my field manager, I'm going the boring route and choosing the skipper with the highest winning percentage in the history of major league ball (.615). True, this percentage is bolstered by his astounding offenses, which may have had a thing or two to do with his having players like Babe Ruth, Ted Williams, Lou Gehrig, and Joe DiMaggio in his lineups, but he also had the ability to coax superlative performances out of players like Hack Wilson, who could barely stay in the league under other managers. Who was this supremely successful molder of teams? Hint

John McGraw
Joe McCarthy
Tommy Lasorda
Jim Fregosi

15. My all-time general manager should come as no surprise. In the 1920s, he was among the first major league figures to begin making working agreements with minor league clubs or buying them outright. His system of using lower-level teams both as training tools and as pipelines to his St. Louis Cardinals - later known as the "farm system" - would later become the standard for all of organized baseball. Later in life, his influence stretched beyond the game as the next team he headed became the first to sign - and play - African-American athletes. Who was this paragon of both foresight and moral courage? Hint

Abner Doubleday
Branch Rickey
Charlie Finley
George Steinbrenner


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. My pick at first base is a relative consensus among baseball sachems. He batted .340 lifetime on the way to hitting 493 homers and driving in 1,990 runs. Though not brilliant defensively, he would eventually earn a decent reputation playing the bag while providing team leadership as Captain of the Yankees. Who is this all-time all-star?

Answer: Lou Gehrig

Of course, Gehrig is largely known for the grace and courage he showed facing the fatal disease that now bears his name, as well as for his endurance in setting the "unbreakable" mark of 2,130 consecutive games played, since surpassed by Cal Ripken, Jr. Among these inspiring stories, however, it is often lost that the man was a force of nature at the plate.

His lifetime OPS+ of 179 (meaning he was 79% more productive than the average player) was exceeded in the twentieth century only by Babe Ruth and Ted Williams.

This en route to six World Series rings. What an individual.
2. At second base, I have perhaps the most obscure player here. He is perpetually underrated, possibly because he never won a batting title on the way to his .333 career batting average. Never the less, he amassed 3,315 hits and 744 stolen bases, as well as a sterling reputation for great defense and a longstanding record of 512 sacrifice hits that will probably never be broken because of changes in how the game is played. Who was this Columbia scholar turned dean of second basemen?

Answer: Eddie Collins

This was probably the hardest pick on this quiz. Joe Morgan certainly would be a worthy choice, given his recognition as Rawlings' All-Time Gold Glove second baseman, his 689 stolen bases, and great power for a middle infielder. I would have a hard time putting him ahead of Collins, however, given Morgan's .271 career batting average, bolstered as it may have been by his great ability to draw a walk (Collins still leads him in on-base percentage, .424 to .392). Rogers Hornsby, on the other hand, was probably the greatest hitting second-sacker of all time, with a .358 batting average and .577 slugging average.

His fielding, however, makes his selection to this team difficult; though hardly awful at the position, he was never more than a hair above average, and cannot compare with the brilliance displayed by Collins in the field. That, and he garnered a reputation for micturition in the shower during his days in baseball, and I would not wish that on anyone.
3. My pick at third base was an all-around great at the position. In his eighteen seasons, he slammed 548 home runs (leading the league eight times) and snagged ten gold gloves. He was honored with three regular-season MVP awards and was World Series MVP in 1980. Who was this dominant player at the hot corner?

Answer: Mike Schmidt

Schmidt's Achilles heel was his propensity to strike out: he was in the National League top ten in the category every year from 1973 to 1985. In 1986, he brought this under control somewhat (striking out 84 times - his previous full-season low was 103), led the league in home runs, won the gold glove, and took home his third MVP.

Despite a modest career batting average of .267, he would lead the league in on-base percentage three times through plate discipline and sheer intimidation.
4. I will not challenge conventional wisdom which has honored one man as the greatest shortstop in the history of the game for most of the last century. He won eight batting titles on the way to a lifetime average of .327, and was often said to be the greatest defensive talent of his age at ANY position he chose, only settling in at shortstop after six seasons of playing wherever he was needed on a particular day. Who is this charter member of the Hall of Fame at Cooperstown?

Answer: Honus Wagner

Wagner also stole 722 bases and led the National League in RBI five times (figured retroactively). Rolled up, his OPS+ (total batting) is 150, a record for shortstops - and this doesn't even take into account Wagner's superlative baserunning.
5. In left field: this is the hardest question I have ever had to write. I am not a fan of my left fielder, and I am not the one to apologize for his actions, either apparent or proven. Never the less, he has broken major league career records for home runs and walks, stolen over 500 bases, and taken home eight gold gloves in left field en route to winning an unprecedented seven MVP awards. Who is this polarizing figure?

Answer: Barry Bonds

The only valid knock against Bonds' case as the greatest left fielder of all time is his steroid use, which was apparently so limited that he has never tested positive. The greatest controversy in this area stems from his association with the Bay Area Laboratory Co-operative (BALCO), employees of which have pled guilty to steroid distribution. I am neither prepared to argue Bonds' case in this matter, nor have I the inclination to do so, but given his accomplishments on the field and his continued eligibility under the rules of baseball, there is no rational reason not to have him on this team, though Barry's personal conduct continues to make it hard to say this.

Since this quiz went online, increasing evidence has come to light that Bonds was indeed a serious steroid user in the last years of his career. Given the reception of this quiz in the meantime, however, I am choking back my own indignation and leaving this question as it sits, especially taking into account that almost all of Bonds' peers were also doping--and the guy STILL won seven MVP awards.
6. In center field, I'll take one of the most memorable players of his or any other day. This second-generation baseball star slammed 660 home runs, stole 338 bases (mostly in the 1950s, when the running game was sorely neglected) and took home twelve gold gloves to go with his two MVP awards and twenty-four All-Star Game selections. Who was this spectacular, multitalented giant of the game who made the most-rebroadcast catch in baseball history during the 1954 World Series?

Answer: Willie Mays

Charles Einstein interviewed the excellent second baseman Joe Gordon for "The Fireside Book of Baseball". In the course of their discussion, Einstein asked Gordon about his teammate Joe DiMaggio, and Gordon responded with a fine set of accolades. Then Einstein asked Gordon to compare DiMaggio to Willie Mays. Gordon paused, smiled, then replied: "You are not going to like this, but the greatest player I ever saw was Willie Mays."
7. In right field, my pick needs neither introduction nor defense. His career stands with the reign of Caesar Augustus and the Florentine Renaissance among the noblest achievements of humanity. In several polls, he ranks with Abraham Lincoln and John Wayne among the most recognizable Americans. Who is this twentieth-century colossus who redefined the game en route to swatting 714 home runs, batting .342, and, defensively, boasting a throwing arm that allowed him to go 94-46 as a pitcher?

Answer: Babe Ruth

What else is there to say about Babe Ruth? His OPS+ rating (a measure which sets an average player's offensive contribution at 100) is 209; he is the only twentieth-century player to be worth twice as much at the plate as an average hitter. In 1920 and 1927, he hit more home runs as an individual than any other team in the American League. Statistician Bill James, whose iconoclastic methods often clash with traditional perceptions, once wrote exasperatedly: "Let's face it, no matter how we rank players, Babe Ruth is going to come out on top." Indeed.
8. Behind the plate, I will resist the temptation to pick Josh Gibson (who, in all honestly, probably would not have been a catcher in major league baseball) in favor of this man, a ten-time gold glove winner who slugged 45 and 40 home runs in his two MVP campaigns. Who was this Cincinnati Red whose manager refused to compare him to anyone else to save other catchers the embarrassment?

Answer: Johnny Bench

Bench's defensive greatness is hard to document; he didn't throw out many baserunners because, as Bill James has noted, nobody would run on Johnny Bench after the man had been in the league a few months. His rocket for an arm (he reportedly threw harder than any pitcher on the staff) is what nudges him ahead of Yogi Berra in my estimation, despite my respect for the winningest catcher in the game's history; good as Yogi was, the stolen base was all but extinct during Berra's tenure as Yankees receiver, and a great-throwing catcher just wasn't as crucial as it would be in Bench's time. Bench's sheer ability in this area overshadows even his fine offense and relative durability, both of which are almost equal with Berra's - Bench had an OPS+ (my preferred "total offense" score) of 126 compared with Berra's 125, and Bench caught 1,742 games compared to 1,699 for Yogi.
9. Though my personal philosophy ranks the idea of the designated hitter right up there with melba toast, I am overlooking my principles to include this great baseball man in this lineup. He batted .344 lifetime with a slugging average of .634. He didn't set any major records for career tallies, mostly because he was away from the game as a flight instructor in World War II and as John Glenn's wingman in the Korean Conflict. Who was this dedicated student of the game who literally wrote the book on modern batsmanship?

Answer: Ted Williams

Time has improved Ted Williams' reputation since his 1960 retirement. During his playing days, his contentious behavior with press and fans alike (he steadfastly refused to tip his hat following a home run after being booed raucously early in his career) made him one of the least popular players of his era. Since then, however, his national service as a soldier and his continued efforts to mentor younger players on hitting - including his authorship of "The Science of Hitting" in 1970, which remains the standard work on the subject - have overshadowed his charismatic shortcomings and monomaniacal devotion to perfecting his batsmanship that was so often seen as arrogance.

He has also drawn praise from luminaries like Buck O'Neil for his recognition of Negro League players in his 1966 Hall of Fame induction speech - a rarity in its day. Perhaps the greatest testament to his ability at the plate was his career on-base percentage of .482, a figure topped by only nine other twentieth-century players - in a SEASON, never a career.
10. I cannot really pile on the statistics about my starting right-handed pitcher because there are none - that I can rely on, anyway. For most of his career, he would alternate - sometimes day to day - between facing good, solid lineups and mowing down semipro squads thrown together for the honor of facing him. As such, he could claim feats like pitching fifty no-hitters and winning 2,000 lifetime games, albeit against decidedly sporadic opposition. Who was this astounding talent who was inducted into Cooperstown in 1971?

Answer: Satchel Paige

Paige made his name in the Negro Leagues, though his career was so far flung that associating him with any one organization is an exercise in folly. He suffered a career crisis in 1938 after an arm injury in the Mexican League. The Kansas City Monarchs carried him that year for exhibition games with their B-team, essentially to cash in on his celebrity.

In early 1939, however, Paige dramatically recovered his form - one story has him confidently tapping his manager on the shoulder and proclaiming: "Turn the bats loose", then mowing down the Monarchs' lineup; the squad would go on to win the next three Negro League World Series with Paige as their ace.

After major league baseball began to accept players of African descent, Paige signed with the Cleveland Indians in 1948, ironically winning the Rookie of Year Award at the putative age of 42 and picking up a World Series ring in the process. Through it all, Paige displayed a speed and delivery on a level with Randy Johnson.

This, combined with remarkable control akin to that of Greg Maddux (Satchel would often lay down a gum wrapper during exhibitions and use that as his "home plate"), makes him my pick.
11. My starting left-handed pitcher also lacks monster career statistics, albeit for entirely different reasons. For six years he toiled in obscurity for the Dodgers - first in his native Brooklyn, then in Los Angeles - posting records that can charitably be called mediocre. In 1961, he had an epiphany, emerging as the most overwhelming pitcher in the game. Over the next six seasons, he led the league in ERA five times, in strikeouts four times, and in wins three times on the way to winning three Cy Young awards, an MVP award (he finished second two other years), and three career World Series rings. Then, as quickly as he emerged, he was gone, retiring before his 31st birthday. Who was this man?

Answer: Sandy Koufax

In 1972, Sandy Koufax became the youngest person ever inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame - with the exception of Lou Gehrig, whose waiting period was waived because of his illness. What is most interesting about Koufax's impact is how so many who played against him or saw him pitch describe the events as almost religious experiences. Columnist Larry Elder wrote: "From 1962 to 1966, the southpaw pitched so brilliantly as to kiss the face of God." Casey Stengel remarked that "the fella is positively amazing and it almost takes a miracle to beat him." Sportswriter Moss Klein recalled that in his teens, having heard that the lefty might be retiring early because of his chronic arthritis, he took his infant nephew to a Mets game just so the boy could say that he saw Koufax pitch. To this day, continues Moss, he will try to steer his conversations with sixties-era players to Koufax just to see them, without fail, sit back and shake their heads.

He was that kind of pitcher.
12. The relief ace is a relatively recent phenomenon in baseball history, and remains a rather liminal figure in the game - infinitely valued when it comes to finishing a close contest, but still carrying the onus of not playing anywhere close to the full nine innings. Indeed, a good case might be made that most of the great starting pitchers would have been better relievers than those who made their careers in the role. I am taking that tack in selecting my closer, an extraordinary fastballer who developed an effective curve and an occasional shocking forkball on his way to leading the American League in ERA an astounding nine times. Who was this dominant lefthander, who was also exemplary pitching in relief?

Answer: Lefty Grove

What is often forgotten by 21st century baseball aficionados is that star pitchers of earlier eras were also expected to shoulder the relief burdens between starts, something Grove did with relish; he once came off the bench and mowed down the Yankees' Hall of Fame murderers' row (Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, and Tony Lazzeri) on ten pitches. Grove led the American League in saves in 1930 and finished in the top ten seven other times.

This in addition to leading the league in strikeouts seven times and in wins four times, finishing with 300 victories despite playing in the International League for five years.
13. For a utility player, my pick is an athlete whose accomplishments as an American figure often overshadow his play on the field. Baseball elder statistician Bill James' "Win Shares" defensive analysis places him among the top 10 second basemen for all who have played 5,000 innings at the position. It also places him as the best third basemen ever (in limited action there), and an elite corner outfielder whose statistics, compiled late in his career, place him among defensive luminaries like Al Kaline and Roberto Clemente. He also batted .311 lifetime, ran the bases like an All-American halfback (which he was), and picked up a Presidential Medal of Freedom in addition to about every other award available to a United States citizen. Who was this player whose Rookie of the Year campaign made front page headlines - and whose name that award now bears?

Answer: Jackie Robinson

A collegiate star at UCLA (where he was the first Bruin to win letters in four sports: baseball, basketball, football and track) Jackie Robinson served in the US Army as a Second Lieutenant from 1942 to 1944. Following his acquittal on court martial charges after refusing to sit in the back of a military bus (over a decade before Rosa Parks did the same thing in Montgomery, Alabama), Robinson began his baseball career playing shortstop for the Kansas City Monarchs in 1945.

When he signed with the Dodger organization after that season, his throwing arm was deemed too weak for shortstop duty, and he trained primarily on the right side of the infield.

However, given his later success at third base (where throwing is at a premium), it may be that the Dodger coaches were a bit hasty.

Indeed, James remarks that Robinson received very few defensive accolades from his contemporaries since he did not make what he did LOOK hard, making small adjustments rather than diving catches. It is tempting to fill this spot with a more spectacular defensive star like Ozzie Smith (who was a great baserunner, though never a good Major League hitter), but Robinson's all-around greatness earns him a place here, perhaps even without regard to his role in the integration of American society.
14. For my field manager, I'm going the boring route and choosing the skipper with the highest winning percentage in the history of major league ball (.615). True, this percentage is bolstered by his astounding offenses, which may have had a thing or two to do with his having players like Babe Ruth, Ted Williams, Lou Gehrig, and Joe DiMaggio in his lineups, but he also had the ability to coax superlative performances out of players like Hack Wilson, who could barely stay in the league under other managers. Who was this supremely successful molder of teams?

Answer: Joe McCarthy

My favorite aspect of McCarthy's style was his attitude toward team rules. In his first season as a manager, he released Hall of Fame pitcher Grover Cleveland Alexander because the Nebraskan would not curb his drinking. Alexander was still a great athlete - he would win a World Series ring with the Cardinals that same year - but McCarthy's standards held, and this hardline approach to substance abuse would help him get the best from notorious tippler Hack Wilson, who set a season RBI record of 191 under McCarthy in 1930, but would only break 100 RBIs once under any other manager. On the other hand, McCarthy wisely dumped his formal dress code when he took over the Boston Red Sox, whose star Ted Williams refused to wear a cravat; bluntly put, McCarthy was smart enough not to fight with the greatest hitter in baseball over a tie. McCarthy was also an innovator in using effective pitchers as relievers rather than leaving that role to whomever was available.

The best example of this was Johnny Murphy, a good pitcher - good enough to be a regular starter - whom McCarthy used almost exclusively in relief.

Here's an eye-popping statistic: McCarthy's 1929 Chicago Cubs scored 982 runs, the third-highest total of any National League team before the advent of Coors Field. However, given his later success with the Yankees and Red Sox, this Cubs team is only the ninth-highest scoring team in McCarthy's career.
15. My all-time general manager should come as no surprise. In the 1920s, he was among the first major league figures to begin making working agreements with minor league clubs or buying them outright. His system of using lower-level teams both as training tools and as pipelines to his St. Louis Cardinals - later known as the "farm system" - would later become the standard for all of organized baseball. Later in life, his influence stretched beyond the game as the next team he headed became the first to sign - and play - African-American athletes. Who was this paragon of both foresight and moral courage?

Answer: Branch Rickey

Enough has been written about Branch Rickey and Jackie Robinson's work in 1946 and 1947 to crash the funtrivia server. Skeptics point out that Rickey was probably more motivated by the financial rewards of signing established Negro League talent than by idealism, and this is likely true; a legendary opportunist, Rickey was famed for working out one-sided deals, and as the saying goes, no one was better at "putting a dollar sign on the muscle" than the Mahatma.

However, one must recognize that Rickey worked for just one of sixteen similarly-attuned competitively capitalist organizations, and one must factor in a degree of righteous chutzpah when evaluting Rickey's role in breaking the color barrier. Among Rickey's other innovations were the regular use of facilities like batting cages and sliding pits; these were permanent features at the first permanent spring training facility, established by Rickey for the Dodgers in Vero Beach, Florida.

He would also be a catalyst for the adoption of batting helmets as standard gear. Finally, his philosophy of baseball education in the well-developed Dodger organization would eventually permeate baseball; between 1960 and 1985, a preponderance of successful major league managers (such as Tommy Lasorda, Dick Williams, Sparky Anderson, Gene Mauch, and Danny Ozark) came from the system Rickey built.
Source: Author stuthehistoryguy

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor gtho4 before going online.
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