Quiz about 100 Greatest Britons  Part 7
Quiz about 100 Greatest Britons  Part 7

100 Greatest Britons - Part 7 Trivia Quiz


This is the seventh of a series of quizzes based on the results of a public vote undertaken by the BBC in 2002. Working in reverse order, this quiz will cover numbers 40-31.

A multiple-choice quiz by Supersal1. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
Supersal1
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
302,690
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
2123
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 165 (4/10), CaJiPaDo (3/10), Guest 146 (6/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. Which English monarch took part in the meeting with Francis I of France, known as "The Field of the Cloth of Gold"? Hint

Henry VII
Henry VIII
Edward V
Edward VI

2. What did John Harrison (1693-1760) invent? Hint

The marine chronometer
The typewriter
The Spinning Jenny
The battery

3. Who wrote the books "Songs of Innocence" and "Songs of Experience"?

Hint

Alexander Pope
William Blake
Thomas Gray
John Keats

4. This "Man For All Seasons" was Lord Chancellor of England from 1529-1532 and was beheaded on the orders of King Henry VIII in July 1535. Hint

Thomas Cromwell
Thomas Cranmer
Thomas More
Thomas Wolsey

5. Sir Steve Redgrave won a gold medal at five consecutive Olympic games. For which sport were these awarded? Hint

Rowing
Cycling
Shooting
Sailing

6. Boudica, leader of the Iceni tribe, is famous for her revolt against the Roman occupation. Who was the Roman Emperor at the time of her revolt in AD 60/61? Hint

Nero
Caligula
Caesar
Commodus

7. Who emigrated to America in 1774, where he produced the pamphlet "Common Sense", supporting American independence from Britain? Hint

Benjamin Franklin
William Cobbet
Titus Oates
Thomas Paine

8. Who became the first English football player to score a goal in three different World Cup tournaments when he scored against Ecuador in 2006? Hint

Steve Gerrard
David Beckham
Michael Owen
Wayne Rooney

9. Five comedians were honoured by having their caricatures printed on postage stamps in 1998. They were Tommy Cooper, Les Dawson, Joyce Grenfell, Peter Cook and who else? Hint

Ernie Wise
Eric Sykes
Dudley Moore
Eric Morecambe

10. Group Captain Leonard Cheshire's name lives on in The Leonard Cheshire Foundation, which cares for disabled and terminally ill people. However, during World War II he was present at which historic event? Hint

Nuclear bombing of Nagasaki
Bombing of Pearl Harbour
Liberation of Auschwitz concentration camp
Liberation of Aomori POW camp


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Which English monarch took part in the meeting with Francis I of France, known as "The Field of the Cloth of Gold"?

Answer: Henry VIII

"The Field of the Cloth of Gold" took place in June 1520 on the outskirts of Calais. It was a diplomatic meeting intending to show friendship between England and France. The two castles in the area were felt to be too rundown to house the courts, so each court had its own campsite, making it possibly the most expensive camping holiday in history. Tents and pavilions were covered with cloth of gold and jewels. Little was achieved politically.
2. What did John Harrison (1693-1760) invent?

Answer: The marine chronometer

Prior to the invention of the marine chronometer, it was difficult for mariners to accurately determine their east/west position. A timepiece was needed that would keep time accurately and not be affected by the rolling of a ship, or extremes of temperature.

A timepiece that lost or gained only a few seconds a day could result in a ship sailing miles off course. John Harrison spent around forty years creating and improving his device - a lifetime's work.
3. Who wrote the books "Songs of Innocence" and "Songs of Experience"?

Answer: William Blake

The two books of poetry were completed in 1789 and 1794 respectively, and since completion of "Songs of Experience" have usually been published together under the titles "Songs of Innocence and Experience: Shewing The Two Contrary States of the Human soul". William Blake (1757-1827) is not only famous for his written work, but also for his paintings and illustrations.
4. This "Man For All Seasons" was Lord Chancellor of England from 1529-1532 and was beheaded on the orders of King Henry VIII in July 1535.

Answer: Thomas More

Thomas More (b. 1478) was a staunch supporter of the Catholic Church and as Lord Chancellor had authorised supporters of Luther's doctrines to be burnt at the stake. He resigned as Lord Chancellor as he felt unable to support Henry VIII's break with Rome.

He refused to swear an oath supporting the Act of Succession. This Act named Anne Boleyn's daughter Elizabeth as heir to the throne, and removed Princess Mary, Katherine of Aragon's daughter, from the succession, declaring her illegitimate. Because of his refusal to swear the oath, More was found guilty of treason and executed at the Tower of London.

He was canonised in 1935.
5. Sir Steve Redgrave won a gold medal at five consecutive Olympic games. For which sport were these awarded?

Answer: Rowing

Sir Steve won his gold medals at Los Angeles (1984), Seoul (1988), Barcelona (1992), Atlanta (1996) and Sydney (2000). He also won three gold medals in the 1986 Commonwealth games in Edinburgh, and has won nine World Championship Rowing medals between 1986-1999.
6. Boudica, leader of the Iceni tribe, is famous for her revolt against the Roman occupation. Who was the Roman Emperor at the time of her revolt in AD 60/61?

Answer: Nero

Boudica's husband willed his kingdom to be ruled jointly by Boudica, their daughters and the Romans. This was not recognised by the Romans and the Iceni Kingdom (corresponding roughly to the county of Norfolk) was annexed by the Romans. Allegedly, Boudica was flogged and her daughters raped. Boudica led the Iceni in a revolt against the Romans.

They left a trail of carnage and destruction, destroying the town of Colchester, London and St Albans. They took no prisoners, killing civilians and soldiers alike.

The Iceni were eventually defeated by the Romans in battle. Boudica's fate is unclear, but legend says that she poisoned herself.
7. Who emigrated to America in 1774, where he produced the pamphlet "Common Sense", supporting American independence from Britain?

Answer: Thomas Paine

Thomas Paine (1737-1809) believed that Republicanism was the only feasible form of government. He was also a strong supporter of the French Revolution, though he did not believe King Louis XVI should have been executed. He died in relative obscurity in New York. Ten years after his death William Cobbet, an admirer of Paine's, removed his body and bought it back to England, presumably with the intent of giving it a fitting burial. Alas, this seems to have slipped his mind as when he died, Paine's remains were still in his possession, and their whereabouts remain unknown.
8. Who became the first English football player to score a goal in three different World Cup tournaments when he scored against Ecuador in 2006?

Answer: David Beckham

David Beckham (b. 1975) and his wife Victoria are much loved paparazzi targets. David also made it to number 91 on a list of 100 Worst Britons!
9. Five comedians were honoured by having their caricatures printed on postage stamps in 1998. They were Tommy Cooper, Les Dawson, Joyce Grenfell, Peter Cook and who else?

Answer: Eric Morecambe

Eric Morecambe (1926-1984) was born John Eric Bartholomew. He took the name Morecambe from his home town. He and partner Ernie Wise were a mainstay of British TV for around thirty years. The Morecambe and Wise Christmas Show was a TV highlight for many years.

In May 1984 he appeared in a stage show in Gloucestershire. He took six curtain calls, and on the last one said "that's your lot". He then walked off stage and collapsed. He died in hospital later that night.
10. Group Captain Leonard Cheshire's name lives on in The Leonard Cheshire Foundation, which cares for disabled and terminally ill people. However, during World War II he was present at which historic event?

Answer: Nuclear bombing of Nagasaki

Leonard Cheshire (1917-1992) was the British observer at the bombing of Nagasaki on 9th August 1945.

After the war he bought a property called Le Court with the intention of providing a base for ex-servicemen and their families to live together to help them adjust to life outside the forces. This venture failed, but Cheshire later found out that one of the servicemen he had tried to help was homeless and terminally ill. He bought the man back to Le Court and nursed him. Things snowballed from there and by 1948 he had 24 people staying at the house.

Today his charity is called Leonard Cheshire Disability and provides support to disabled people worldwide. Cheshire married Sue Ryder, who had herself founded a charity providing support for those with serious illnesses.
Source: Author Supersal1

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor gtho4 before going online.
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